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  • Exodus 1-18

    Exodus is the heart of the Hebrew Bible, the defining moment in Israel's birth as a people, the dramatic triumph of their God. Yahweh, Pharaoh, Moses, Aaron, the Hebrew slaves, the plagues, the parting of the Red Sea--these larger-than-life characters and epoch-making events capture the imagination of everyone from biblical scholars to moviemakers. However, the meaning and significance, the beauty and nuance, of this captivating biblical book are lost unless we have a world-class Scripture scholar to open our eyes to its riches.
    In Exodus 1-18, William H. C. Propp translates the original text in all its grandeur, then provides a masterful exploration and analysis of the book's first eighteen chapters. Here the fate of the Hebrew slaves hangs in the balance of the dramatic conflict between the God of Israel and the Pharaoh of Egypt. From the discovery of Moses in a basket made of bulrushes to the story of the Burning Bush, from the ten plagues visited upon Egypt by God to water from the rock and quail and manna from the skies, Exodus is filled with the miraculous and the dramatic.
    Doubleday is proud to be publishing the long-awaited first of two volumes of the Anchor Bible Commentary on Exodus. Exhaustive, meticulous, and brilliantly researched, Propp's Exodus 1-18 is well worth the wait, exceeding expectations and meeting the reader's every need.

  • South and East Clerkenwell - Survey of London, V46

    Clerkenwell is one of the most varied, intricate and richly historic districts of Englands capital city. Its choice for study by the Survey of London is a mark both of its age-old fascination and of its contemporary appeal. Today Southern Clerkenwell, just north of the City, has become a fashionable location. It houses many in the creative industries, its restaurants and bars are thronged, and its population has been rising for two decades. Northern Clerkenwell, by contrast, has long been acknowledged as having some of Londons best Georgian housing and urban landscapes. There is also an intriguingly mixed quarter beyond the Angel and Pentonville Road, reaching north into Islington. The two parts of Clerkenwell are covered separately in these two interlinked volumes, which are available either separately or as a pair. Clerkenwells present prosperity is rooted in its past. Its density of development, its patterns of land-use and its street layout are witnesses to an unbroken history, going back to monastic foundations. Within the compass of the present volumes, the Survey of London brings together the riches of the area, aiming to omit nothing of significance old or new. In so doing it has created a practical record in words and images of enduring value and usefulness for planners, residents, historians and the wider public. These volumes are the latest in the parish series published at regular intervals over the past hundred years by the Survey of London. They mark several new departures for the Survey. They are the first to be published by Yale University Press, under the sponsorship of the Paul Mellon Centre, and the first to have photographs integrated with the text alongside the handsome architectural drawings for which the series is famed. They also make widespread use of colour images for the first time. Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

  • Art and Love In Renaissance Italy

    With contributions by Sarah Cartwright, Jessie McNab, J. Kenneth Moore, Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, Wendy Thompson, and Jeremy Warren Many famous Italian Renaissance artworks were made to celebrate love and marriage. They were the pinnacles of a tradition---dating from the early Renaissance---of commemorating betrothal, marriage, and the birth of a child by commissioning extraordinary objects or exchanging them as gifts. This important volume is the first to examine the entire range of works to which Renaissance rituals of love and marriage gave rise and makes a major contribution to our understanding of Renaissance art in its broader cultural context. Some 140 works of art, dating from about 1400 to 1600, are discussed by a distinguished group of scholars and are reproduced in full color. Marriage and childbirth gifts are the point of departure. These range from maiolica, glassware, and jewelry to birth trays, musical instruments, and nuptial portraits. Bonds of love of another sort were represented in erotic drawings and prints. From these precedents, an increasingly inventive approach to subjects of love and marriage culminated in paintings by some of the greatest artists of the Renaissance, including Giulio Romano, Lorenzo Lotto, and Titian.

  • A Guide to the Stone Circles of Britain, Ireland and Brittany Updated 2e

    This practical and knowledgeable guidebook deals comprehensively with the stone circles of Britain and Ireland and with the cromlechs and megalithic "horseshoes" of Brittany. This new edition includes a section on "Druidical" circles, romantic creations of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
    "This book is not only an elegant and practical guide, it is also the best single-volume study of this extraordinary phenomenon, embracing 500 monuments from Shetland to Brittany. . . . Confident, erudite, pleasurable, this volume can be recommended as travel guide, archaeology, literature, and sheer good company."--Ian Sheperd, British Archaeology
    "This is a wonderful book and is a must for anyone remotely interested in things megalithic."--Paul Walsh, Archaeology Ireland

  • The Literature of Ancient Egypt - An Anthology of Stories, Instructions and Poetry 3e

    The latest edition of this highly praised anthology of ancient Egyptian literature offers fresh translations of all the texts as well as some twenty-five new entries, including writings from the late literature of the Demotic period at the end of classical Egyptian history. The book also includes an extensive bibliography.

    Praise for the earlier editions:

    "An elegant, easily readable, and most serviceable volume."--K. A. Kitchen, Journal of Near Eastern Studies

    "A reliable rendering of the Egyptian text that can be useful to students of Egyptology and provide the layman with delightful reading material."--Mordechai Gilula, Cultura

  • The Origins of Corporations - The Mills of Toulouse in the Middle Ages

    Fully modern corporations appeared in fourteenth-century Toulouse, much earlier than previously believed

    Germain Sicard proves that Europe's first corporations were fourteenth-century mill companies operating in Toulouse, rather than seventeenth-century English and Dutch trading companies as commonly believed. He shows that the corporate form derives from a unique ownership contract from Medieval Europe called pariage, and a culture of strong property rights and municipal self-governance. Based on archival research, Sicard's 1952 thesis has been translated into English with an introduction that places the work in the context of new institutional economics and legal theory. It is an important contribution to research on the history and legal origins of the corporation.

  • Lions, Dragons and Other Beasts - Aquamanillia of the Middle Ages - Vessels for Church and Table

    This fascinating book explores the history, techniques, and cultural significance of medieval aquamanilia, cast metal objects used to pour water for hand washing in religious and secular contexts. Usually created in appealing animal or human forms, aquamanilia feature two openings, one for filling and the other for pouring. They represent the first emergence of hollow-cast vessels in Western Europe and a significant development in the history of technology. The book presents and catalogues the entire aquamanilia collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art for the first time, as well as selected examples from other collections and other related medieval objects.

  • Ezekiel 1-20

    In Ezekiel 1-20, the first of two volumes of commentary on the Scripture attributed to the third major Old Testament prophet, Moshe Greenberg uses accessible prose to explain Ezekiel's ecstatic, erratic, almost incomprehensible otherworldly visions and prophecies. One of this century's most respected biblical scholars, Greenberg translates the text, identifies the critical issues raised by the book, and offers an impressively balanced, thoroughly holistic interpretation of Ezekiel. Ezekiel 1-20 rigorously engages the biblical text with all the tools of historical critical analysis. Drawing upon the rich history of Jewish and Christian interpretation, Greenberg employs ancient and modern sources in his elucidation of this most difficult prophetic book. Only his second and final volume, Ezekiel 21-48, can complete the most authoritative commentary on Ezekiel.

  • Adorning the World - Art of the Marquesas Islands

    Renowned as the final refuge of Paul Gauguin, the Marquesas Islands northeast of Tahiti are home to the Enata, a Polynesian people who developed one of the most extraordinary traditions of sculpture and decorative art in the Pacific. This book features works, including many previously unpublished, from the Metropolitan and other museums and private collections, and it explores the fascinating ways in which Marquesan art embodied and enhanced secular and religious life. Created to honour the archipelago's diverse gods and ancestors, adorn the bodies of its people, and decorate everyday objects, art in the Marquesas encompassed virtually every aspect of sacred and secular life. Marquesan art is celebrated for its elegant stylization of the human image and intricately decorated surfaces, while also displaying an astonishing diversity of forms that range from robust figural sculpture in wood and stone to the most elaborate tattooing in the Pacific. Exhibition schedule: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 10 May 2005 to 16 January 2006.

  • Rethinking the Holocaust

    Yehuda Bauer, one of the world's premier historians of the Holocaust, here presents an insightful overview and reconsideration of its history and meaning. Drawing on research he and other historians have done in recent years, he offers fresh opinions on such basic issues as how to define and explain the Holocaust; whether it can be compared with other genocides; how Jews reacted to the murder campaign against them; and what the relationship is between the Holocaust and the establishment of Israel.

    The Holocaust says something terribly important about humanity, says Bauer. He analyzes explanations of the Holocaust by Zygmunt Bauman, Jeffrey Herf, Goetz Aly, Daniel Goldhagen, John Weiss, and Saul Friedlander and then offers his own interpretation of how the Holocaust could occur. Providing fascinating narratives as examples, he deals with reactions of Jewish men and women during the Holocaust and tells of several attempts at rescue operations. He also explores Jewish theology of the Holocaust, arguing that our view of the Holocaust should not be clouded by mysticism: it was an action by humans against other humans and is therefore an explicable event that we can prevent from recurring.

  • The Opera Lover′s Companion

    Every opera lover enjoys a performance more when accompanied by a knowledgeable friend. In this indispensable guide, well-known opera critic Charles Osborne provides exactly that. Osborne fills in the details on 175 of the world's most frequently performed operas, including facts about the composer and the music, a plot outline, accounts of famous performers, and much more.
    This book is exactly what the title claims: an opera lover's companion. Reading it is like going to the opera with a knowledgeable friend who tells you enough to make you want to see the piece but not so much you're drowned in superfluous detail.--Richard Fawkes, Opera Now
    What this invaluable book contains is the ideal rundown on 175 operas from Auber's Fra Diavolo to Zimmerman's Die Soldaten, in each case putting the work in context within the composer's development, with a list of characters, a short synopsis and pointers towards the most imortant arias, duets and ensembles, all in a personal congenial tone, like unto an operatically wise and loving uncle.--Denby Richards, Musical Opinion
    "An erudite, instructive and unpretentious guide."--Michael Kennedy, The Sunday Telegraph
    It's hard to imagine any other book on the subject more informative and helpful to the average enthusiast. . . . This book is one you'll cherish.--Books in Canada

  • Glasgow

    Glasgow has a wide array of architectural treasures: the greatest medieval cathedral in Scotland; fragments of a seventeenth- and eighteenth-century 'merchant city'; the well-preserved heart of a planned new town, Blythswood; a city centre dense with Victorian and Edwardian commercial buildings; stately nineteenth-century terraces lining the Great Western Road and picturesquely crowning Woodlands Hill; opulent villas in suburbs like Pollokshields and Kelvinside; and streets of tenements from the workaday to the grand. The twentieth century has encircled the city with a broad belt of public housing, and this too has a fascinating history that encompasses garden suburbs, early experiments in high-rise, comprehensive redevelopments and new interpretations of the tenement tradition. Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Alexander 'Greek' Thomson are, of course, internationally known, but the exceptional talents of Glasgow's many other architects, such as Charles Wilson, James Salmon Jr. and Jack Coia, have helped to shape the city's distinctive character.

  • Ourselves Unborn - An Embryologist`s Essay on Man

    Dr. George Washington Corner, one of the most eminent embryologists in the United States, has written in this book an account of what happens to man (and other mammals) before birth. Here is the latest knowledge in the possession of the embryologist, presented so that the layman can read it; the story of the miraculous change from a single cell to an organism two billion times its original size, ready to take its place in the open air of the outside world. Here is also the story of what is and what is not true in beliefs about prenatal shocks to the mother and their effects on the offspring, ranging from the myths of sights and foods to avoid to the all-too-true accounts of what a comparatively harmless virus can do to the embryo. This book in its complete outline of the vicissitudes of the prenatal cells is an important document for any member of the human race.

  • Constitutional Courts and Democratic Values - A European Perspective

    In this book, Victor Ferreres Comella contrasts the European "centralized" constitutional court model, in which one court system is used to adjudicate constitutional questions, with a decentralized model, such as that of the United States, in which courts deal with both constitutional and nonconstitutional questions. Comella's systematic exploration of the reasons for and against the creation of constitutional courts is rich in detail and offers an ambitious theory to justify the European preference for them. Based on extensive research on eighteen European countries, Comella finds that centralized review fits well with the civil law tradition and structures of ordinary adjudication in those countries. Comella concludes that-while the decentralized model works for the United States-there is more than one way to preserve democratic values and that these values are best preserved in the parliamentary democracies of Europe through constitutional courts.

  • Jean Fouquet and the Inovation of France - Art and Nation after the Hundred Years War

    Jean Fouquet was France's most important 15th-century artist, painting for the courts of Charles VII and Louis XI. His art synthesized the realistic style of Flemish arts like van Eyck with the monumentality of Florentines like Masaccio. Fouquet's work had a powerful appeal, shaping the next two generations of painters and introducing to the French a taste for Italian art.

    The first survey of Fouquet's work in English in nearly sixty years, this captivating book offers a major advance in scholarship about the artist and his far-reaching impact. Erik Inglis links Fouquet's style, iconography, and audience to explain how his art helped define French identity, a project of great importance for anxious courtiers in the wake of the Hundred Years War. Jean Fouquet and the Invention of France provides a new lens for looking at the century that saw the greatest changes in French art prior to Impressionism.

  • Isaiah 56-66

    The world's leading authority on the prophet Isaiah brings his distinguished three-volume commentary on the book of Isaiah to a conclusion with this new translation and critical discussion of the final eleven chapters.

    The concluding section of the book of Isaiah, sometimes referred to as Third or Trito Isaiah, had a profound impact on the Christian movement in its formative phase, including such central issues as the identity of the founder, the profile of the disciple, and the Gentile mission. In this thorough and informative commentary, Joseph Blenkinsopp shows that while these chapters maintain continuity with Second Isaiah, they must be considered in the light of a new set of circumstances.
    The texts present a community beset by severe problems, attempting to cope with disappointed expectations and trying to maintain its faith in the reality, power, and benevolence of the God of traditional religion. Blenkinsopp discusses in detail the issues that divide the community, from concerns about the efficacy of religious practices (prayer, fasting, Sabbath observance, and sacrifice) to questions about who may claim the name of Israelite and under what conditions, to what kind of relations should be maintained with outsiders. In examining each of these topics, Blenkinsopp shows that they provide evidence of an emerging Judaism seeking its own identity and self-definition and testify to the existence of a prophetic discipleship inspired by the person and teaching of the charismatic servant whose fate is described in the previous section of Isaiah.

    Reflecting the same standard of excellence as Blenkinsopp's first two volumes on Isaiah, this is an important contribution to the prestigious Anchor Bible Commentary series.

  • Ponary Diary, July 1941-November 1943 - A Bystander′s Account of Mass Murder

    A chilling wartime diary of the destruction of the Lithuanian/Polish Jews, recorded by a non-Jew

    About sixty thousand Jews from Wilno (Vilnius, Jewish Vilna) and surrounding townships in present-day Lithuania were murdered by the Nazis and their Lithuanian collaborators in huge pits on the outskirts of Ponary. Over a period of several years, Kazimierz Sakowicz, a Polish journalist who lived in the village of Ponary, was an eyewitness to the murder of these Jews as well as to the murders of thousands of non-Jews on an almost daily basis. He chronicled these events in a diary that he kept at great personal risk.


    Written as a simple account of what Sakowicz witnessed, the diary is devoid of personal involvement or identification with the victims. It is thus a unique document: testimony from a bystander, an "objective" observer without an emotional or a political agenda, to the extermination of the Jews of the city known as "the Jerusalem of Lithuania."


    Sakowicz did not survive the war, but much of his diary did. Painstakingly pieced together by Rahel Margolis from scraps of paper hidden in various locations, the diary was published in Polish in 1999. It is here published in English for the first time, extensively annotated by Yitzhak Arad to guide readers through the events at Ponary.

  • Henry ′the Navigator′ - A Life

    Henry the Navigator, fifteenth-century Portuguese prince and explorer, is a legendary, almost mythical figure in late medieval history. Considered along with Columbus to be one of the progenitors of modernity, Prince Henry challenged the scientific assumptions of his age and was responsible for liberating Europeans from geographical restraints that had bound them since the Roman Empire's collapse. In this enthralling account of Henry's life--the first biography of "The Navigator" in more than a century--Peter Russell reaps the harvest of a lifelong study of Prince Henry. Making full use of documentary evidence only recently available, Russell reevaluates Henry and his role in Portuguese and European history.

    Examining the full range of Prince Henry's activities, Russell discusses the explorer's image as an imperialist and as a maritime, mathematical, and navigational pioneer. He considers Henry's voyages of discovery in the African Atlantic, their economic and cultural consequences, and the difficult questions they generated regarding international law and papal jurisdiction. Russell demonstrates the degree to which Henry was motivated by the predictions of his astrologer--an aspect of his career little known until now--and explains how this innovator, though firmly rooted in medieval ways of thinking and behaving, set in motion a current of change that altered European history.

  • Compass and Rule - Architecture as Mathematical Practice

    The spread of Renaissance culture in England coincided with the birth of the profession of architecture, whose practitioners soon became superior to simple builders in social standing and perceived intellectual prowess. This stimulating book, which focuses in particular on the scientist, mathematician, and architect Sir Christopher Wren, explores the extent to which this new professional identity was based on expertise in the mathematical arts and sciences. Featuring drawings, instruments, paintings and other examples of the material culture of English architecture, the book discusses the role of mathematics in architectural design and building technology. It begins with architectural drawing in the sixteenth century, moves to large-scale technical drawing under Henry VIII, considers Inigo Jones and his royal buildings and Christopher Wren and the dome of St. Paul's, and concludes with the architectural education of George III. Interweaving text and visual image, the book investigates the boundaries between art and science in architecture - the most artistic of the sciences and the most scientific of the arts.

  • Rafael Moneo - Building, Teaching, Writing

    A critical look at the life, work, and influence of the important and award-winning Spanish architect Rafael Moneo

    The Spanish architect Rafael Moneo (b. 1937) has won numerous awards (including the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize), yet this publication is the first to offer a critical study of his career as a whole--not only his many built works and projects but also his contributions to teaching and his writings. The book begins with a comprehensive biography, covering Moneo's education, teaching appointments, and encounters with historians and architects in Europe and the United States, such as Peter Eisenman, Jorn Utzon, and Bruno Zevi. Also included is a discussion of some of the buildings that he has designed, notably the Prado Museum extension and Atocha Station in Madrid. The following section examines in more detail seven key buildings chosen to illustrate crucial developments in Moneo's thinking, from the Bankinter, Madrid, to the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles. The last and most extensive section considers his architectural philosophy: his design approach, his idea of the canon, his theory of composition, his notion of form, and his confrontation with reality--in construction and context.

  • Letter to Philemon

    The apostle Paul's letter to his friend and fellow Christian Philemon, which focuses on the question of slavery, has long inspired debate. Onesimus, one of Philemon's slaves and a Christian himself, has left his master's house and sought refuge with Paul. In a letter to Philemon, Paul assures his friend that he is sending Onesimus back into captivity, but pleads for mercy on the slave's behalf, asking Philemon to treat him as a beloved brother and as he would treat the apostle.Examining Paul's letter within the context of the social, political, and economic realities of the times, Fitzmyer sheds light on the question of whether Paul was suggesting that Onesimus be granted freedom from slavery or whether he was simply advocating a lenient treatment of this particular slave. His insights not only clarify Paul's position but show why the letter is relevant in the Church today.

  • Harry Callahan - The Photographer at Work

    A revelatory new study of the twentieth-century master Harry Callahan, offering insights into his often experimental process and his contribution to the history of photography

    Harry Callahan (1912-1999) was one of the most influential photographic artists of the twentieth century. A master of modernist experimentation, Callahan explored a range of subjects--from landscapes to city streets to portraits of his wife--and techniques throughout his career.


    Beautifully designed and produced, this book focuses on understanding how Callahan worked--both his day-to-day photographic explorations and his resulting fifty-year career in photography. Exploring the rich contents of the Harry Callahan Archive at the Center for Creative Photography, the authors look at how Callahan's choice of subjects and visual ideas emerged from deliberate and improvisational processes, and how such processes might be revealed with archival materials such as negatives, transparencies, proof prints, sequential ordering, and variant printings. This close investigation of Callahan's individual and experimental approach to materials in turn leads to a larger consideration of his relationship to seemingly contradictory strains in American visual culture of the twentieth century.


    Reproducing a host of previously unpublished images and documents, this volume juxtaposes select artifacts--such as contact sheets and variants--with final images to explicate Callahan's life in and influence upon photography. Harry Callahan: The Photographer at Work will offer a rare glimpse into the creative process of an important and fascinating artist.

  • Hull - Pevsner City Guides

    Hull is one of the great historic trading centres of northeast England. Severely hit by industrial decline, it has recently begun to see substantial regeneration. Exciting new architectural projects reflect the fierce pride of the community and relate closely to the citys magnificent maritime history. Filled with numerous maps; plans; and superb, specially taken colour photographs, this new Pevsner Guide is an indispensable visitors companion to Hull. This is an authoritative, practical and well-illustrated guide to Hulls buildings. The core of the city is the Old Town with its medieval churches, 17th and 18th-century merchants houses and Victorian and Edwardian commercial and public buildings. Detailed walks explore the waterfront area with its exciting recent developments and the Georgian and later suburbs with their many hidden delights. Excursions include the outstanding market town of Beverley. The wide-ranging introduction, specially taken colour photographs and numerous maps make this an essential reference work and easy-to-use visitors companion.

  • Solomon′s Secret Arts - The Occult in the Age of Enlightenment

    The late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are known as the Age of Enlightenment, a time of science and reason. But in this illuminating book, Paul Monod reveals the surprising extent to which Newton, Boyle, Locke, and other giants of rational thought and empiricism also embraced the spiritual, the magical, and the occult. Although public acceptance of occult and magical practices waxed and waned during this period they survived underground, experiencing a considerable revival in the mid-eighteenth century with the rise of new antiestablishment religious denominations. The occult spilled over into politics with the radicalism of the French Revolution and into literature in early Romanticism. Even when official disapproval was at its strongest, the evidence points to a growing audience for occult publications as well as to subversive popular enthusiasm. Ultimately, finds Monod, the occult was not discarded in favor of "reason" but was incorporated into new forms of learning. In that sense, the occult is part of the modern world, not simply a relic of an unenlightened past, and is still with us today.

  • No Fixed Points - Dance in the Twentieth Century

    The definitive history of twentieth-century theatrical dance, enhanced with more than 200 exceptional photographs

    This book chronicles one hundred years of dramatic developments in ballet, modern, and experimental dance for stage and screen in Europe and North America. The volume is magisterial in scope, encompassing the history of theatrical dance from 1900 through 2000. Beginning with turn-of-the-century dancer-choreographers like Loie Fuller, Isadora Duncan, Michel Fokine, and a bit later Vaslav Nijinsky, and proceeding through the profusion of dance styles performed today, the book provides an unparalleled view of dance in performance as it changed and grew in the twentieth century. Nancy Reynolds and Malcolm McCormick set dance in broader cultural and historical contexts, examine specific dance works, and explore the contributions of outstanding choreographers, performers, visual artists, impresarios, composers, critics, and other figures. They discuss the breakaway barefoot dance of the early 1900s and demonstrate its links with later forms and styles. With unusual detail, fascinating illustrations, and wide-ranging insights, this book is an indispensable guide to the transformations in the dance scene of the twentieth century.

  • Intuition - Its Powers and Perils

    How reliable is our intuition? How much should we depend on gut-level instinct rather than rational analysis? In this engaging book, David G. Myers shows us that while intuition can provide us with useful--and often amazing--insights, it can also dangerously mislead us.
    Myers' book brilliantly establishes intuition as a legitimate subject of scientific inquiry.--Michael Shermer, Los Angeles Times Book Review
    A lively and thorough review of the powers and pitfalls of gut instinct.--Eric Bonabeau, Harvard Business Review
    [Intuition is a book] that may help you make optimal use of your intuition. . . . [It] offers scientific grounding in the subject and practical steps for becoming more intelligently intuitive.--Money Magazine's e-mail newsletter
    Delightfully readable and deliberately provocative.--Publishers Weekly (front cover)
    Entertaining, intelligent, and easy to read, Myers's book offers an abundance of research findings dealing with what is more aptly called the 'nonconscious' mind.--Choice
    "Intuition is a one-of-a-kind book by one of the best writers in psychology. Exceptionally reasonable, totally up-to-date, and responsible, the book has the potential to be a classic in the field."--Robert J. Sternberg, 2003 president, American Psychological Association

  • Ephesians 1-3

    Encompassing the body of Pauline theology, Ephesians (volumes 34 and 34A of the acclaimed Anchor Bible series) has been called "the crown of St. Paul's writings," yet both its authorship and addressees are the subject of continuing dispute. Through line-by-line examination of its vocabulary, its difficult style, its Qumran and Gnostic affinities, its parallels with and distinctions from the undisputed Pauline corpus, its use of the Old Testament, and its dialogue with orthodox and heretical Judaism, Markus Barth demonstrates that Paul was almost certainly the author. And, after exploring previous explications of this hymnic and admonitory epistle in detail, he concludes that it was intended for Gentile Christians converted after Paul's visits to Ephesus. On this basis, Barth reexamines the relationship between Israel and the church, discounting the thesis that Ephesians suggests an "early Catholic," or high-ecclesiastic or sacramental doctrine. Instead, he finds in this letter a statement of the social reconciliation which conditions the salvation of the individual. And reevaluating the section describing the relation between husband and wife, he offers an alternative to the traditional notion that Paul degrades women or belittles their rights and their dignity. In these two volumes Barth has followed the structure of Ephesians: upon the praise of God (chapters 1-3) are based the admonitions (chapters 4-6). But just as the epistle is an integral whole, so is the author's commentary. Through his special understanding and love of the apostle Paul, Markus Barth reopens to modern man the ancient message of love, worship and joy.

  • Bach - The Mass in B Minor

    In this book George B. Stauffer explores the music and complex history of Bach's last and possibly greatest masterpiece. Stauffer examines the B-Minor Mass in greater detail than ever before, demonstrating for the first time Bach's reliance on contemporary models from the Dresden Mass repertory and his brilliantly innovative methods of unifying his immense composition. Musicians, music scholars, students, and music lovers will find in this engagingly written book a wealth of information about Bach's extraordinary choral work.
    Stauffer surveys the roots of the Mass Ordinary text and its treatment in settings known to Bach. He looks at the events that led to the writing of the B-Minor Mass and places the work within the context of the composer's late style. In three deeply informed chapters, Stauffer considers the individual sections of the Mass--the Kyrie and Gloria, the Credo, and the Sanctus and Agnus Dei. The book also traces the history of the work after Bach's death, addresses specific issues of performance practice, and investigates the qualities that give the B-Minor Mass its universal appeal.

  • Wagner - The Last of the Titans

    In this new biography of Richard Wagner, Joachim Kohler draws on social and political analysis, documentary interpretation, and psychological insights to paint a rounded picture of Wagner as both a controversial historical phenomenon and a complex human being.
    Kohler's reading of the letters, diaries, and other documents of the main protagonists, some of them unfamiliar even to seasoned Wagnerians, results in some breathtaking but convincing reappraisals. He examines Wagner's love affairs with Jessie Laussot, Mathilde Wesendonck, and Judith Gautier and assesses their lasting emotional effect. He re-evaluates Wagner's relationships with his mother, step-father, sister, and--most revealingly--his wife, Cosima, a relationship seen as based on fear rather than love. Kohler explores the philosophical roots of Wagner's work, which the composer himself deliberately obfuscated. And he analyzes Wagner's relationship with King Ludwig, whom Wagner is revealed to have blackmailed, and with Nietzsche, whom he tried to destroy.
    The traumas of his youth haunted Wagner throughout his life, as his emotional development underlay his notorious anti-semitism. Kohler's interpretation of Wagner's dreams, as recorded in Cosima's diaries, offers astonishing insights into the paranoia and insecurity of a man who was one of the leading composers of his age.

  • Spanish Drawings in the Princeton University Art Museum

    The Princeton University Art Museum's collection of Spanish drawings includes masterworks by artists such as Jusepe de Ribera (1591-1652), Bartolome Esteban Murillo (1617-1682), Francisco Goya (1746-1828), Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), and Salvador Dali (1904-1989). Although many of the drawings in the collection relate to celebrated paintings, commissions, and other works by these artists, they remain largely unknown. Most have not been published previously and many are attributed here for the first time.

    In Spanish Drawings in the Princeton University Art Museum, preeminent scholars enrich the growing corpus of work on Spanish drawings with original research. Each of the 95 drawings is reproduced in color, often accompanied by comparative illustrations. Watermarks have been documented with beta radiography and are included in an appendix. Provenances and artist biographies round out this detailed record of one of the most important collections of its kind.

  • The Ancient Synagogue - The First Thousand Years 2e

    In his comprehensive history of the synagogue from the Hellenistic period through Late Antiquity, Lee Levine traces the origins and development of this dynamic and revolutionary institution. This revised paperback edition reflects the latest information in the field and includes a wealth of recently published material ranging from excavation reports and monographs to articles appearing in edited volumes and scholarly journals.
    Reviews of the first edition:
    "Will undoubtedly remain for a long time the leading work of reference in the field."--Stefan C. Reif, Times Literary Supplement
    "Monumental."--Martin S. Jaffee, Religious Studies Review
    "A necessary read for any serious student of Judaism or Christianity in Late Antiquity."--Christopher Beall, Journal of Jewish Studies
    "A splendid and imposing achievement that crowns the career of an outstanding scholar."--Morton I. Techer, Jerusalem Post
    "[In] this handsome volume . . . [Levine] has provided us with the single best survey of all relevant historical, archaeological, architectural, and institutional issues related to one of the oldest surviving institutions of the world."--Eckhard J. Schnabel, Trinity Journal

  • The Great Meadow - Farmers and the Land in Colonial Concord

    An unprecedented look at how colonial farmers adapted to the challenges of New England's climate and soil and achieved a sustainable agricultural system
    The farmers of colonial New England have been widely accused of farming extensively, neglecting manure, wearing out their land, and moving on. But did they? And if so, when and why? Brian Donahue offers an innovative, accessible, and authoritative history of the early farming practices of Concord, Massachusetts, and challenges the long-standing notion that colonial husbandry degraded the land. In fact, he argues, the Concord community of farmers achieved a remarkably successful and sustainable system of local production. Donahue describes in precise detail--using among other tools an innovative historical geographical information system (GIS) method--how land was settled and how mixed husbandry was developed in Concord. By reconstructing several farm neighborhoods and following them through many generations, he reveals the care with which farmers managed the land, soil, and water. He concludes that ecological degradation came to Concord only later, when nineteenth-century economic and social forces undercut the environmental balance that earlier colonial farmers had nurtured.

  • The Nonprofit Sector - A Research Handbook 2e

    The second edition of The Nonprofit Sector provides a novel, comprehensive, cross-disciplinary perspective on nonprofit organizations and their role and function in society. This new, updated edition keeps pace with industry trends and advances as well as with the changing interests and needs of students, practitioners, and researchers. As before, every chapter has been written to stand on its own, providing sufficient background for the reader to follow the argument without referring to other chapters--allowing readers to selectively choose those chapters that are most relevant to a particular course, interest, or issue.

    The Nonprofit Sector: A Research Handbook includes twenty-seven new or updated chapters. Relevant chapters from the previous edition have been refined, and new chapters have been added to fill in gaps, making this the authoritative reference for all who want an accessible, perceptive, and all-inclusive rendering of the nonprofit sector. The contributors--prominent scholars in their respective fields--carefully reflect upon the variety of changes in the rapidly growing world of nonprofits, examining a wide array of organizations, international issues, social science theories, and philanthropic traditions and covering a broad range of topics including the history and scope of nonprofit activities in the United States and abroad, the relation of nonprofits to the marketplace, government-nonprofit issues, key activities of nonprofits, aspects of giving to and joining nonprofits, and nonprofit mission and governance. For anyone who wishes to have a deeper understanding of the nonprofit sector, this remains the essential guide.

    From reviews of the first edition:

    "[This book] is the closest thing to a 'bible' of nonprofit sector research and state-of-the-art social science knowledge as currently exists."--Dennis R. Young, Public Administration Review

    "Invaluable to anyone currently engaged in research or policy decisions involving nonprofit organizations or, for that matter, considering becoming involved."--Jerald Schiff, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management

    "An exceptionally useful resource."--Mark D. Hughes, The Philanthropist

  • Balenciaga and His Legacy

    Born in 1895 in a remote fishing village in Spain, Cristobal Balenciaga learned sewing and tailoring at his mother's knee. By 1937, the talented and persistent young man had opened his own design salon in Paris, and in the years following World War II he emerged as a designer to be reckoned with in the world of haute couture. The House of Balenciaga grew to serve an international clientele from locations in Paris, Madrid, and Barcelona, and from 1937 to its closing in 1968 created some of the most outstanding and innovative examples of French and Spanish haute couture of the era.
    This beautifully illustrated book presents nearly 70 Balenciaga creations for day and evening, along with 25 hats, from the extraordinary archives of the Texas Fashion Collection of the University of North Texas. The book also includes striking fashion photographs from Vogue magazine and Harper's Bazaar by Richard Avedon and Louise Dahl-Wolfe. A series of essays explores many aspects of the designer's work, among them his contributions to fashion history; connections with such other prominent designers as Hubert de Givenchy and Oscar de la Renta; important relationships with Neiman Marcus and fashion buyer Bert de Winter in Dallas; and his close friend and client Claudia Heard de Osborne.

  • Art and the Early Photographic Album

    One of the most prized categories of early photography was the reproduction of artworks, a role in which photographs largely replaced engravings in book imagery during the mid-19th century. Photographs of paintings, sculptures, and other works were compiled in albums, ranging from surveys of museum collections and catalogues of works by single artists to illustrated travel guides and archaeological reports. While such albums have often been valued for documentary purposes, their broader role in the institutional development of art has, until now, been overlooked. The first book on the subject, this collection of twelve essays explores topics such as how the acclaim of artists like Rubens grew because their paintings reproduced so well in photographs, how Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel frescoes were given a new public identity by the photographer's choice of striking details never explored in traditional prints, and other important ways in which photographically illustrated publications influenced the experience and the history of art.

  • A Man′s Place - Masculinity and the Middle-Class Home in Victorian England

    Domesticity is generally treated as an aspect of women's history. In this fascinating study of the nineteenth-century middle class, John Tosh shows how profoundly men's lives were conditioned by the Victorian ideal and how they negotiated its many contradictions.
    Tosh begins by looking at the experience of boyhood, married life, sex, and fatherhood in the early decades of the nineteenth century--illustrated by case studies representing a variety of backgrounds--and then contrasts this with the lives of the late Victorian generation. He finds that the first group of men placed a new value on the home as a reaction to the disorienting experience of urbanization and as a response to the teachings of Evangelical Christianity. Domesticity still proved problematic in practice, however, because most men were likely to be absent from home for most of the day, and the role of father began to acquire its modern indeterminacy. By the 1870s, men were becoming less enchanted with the pleasures of home. Once the rights of wives were extended by law and society, marriage seemed less attractive, and the bachelor world of clubland flourished as never before.
    The Victorians declared that to be fully human and fully masculine, men must be active participants in domestic life. In exposing the contradictions in this ideal, they defined the climate for gender politics in the next century.

  • The Christian West and Its Singers - The First Thousand Years

    The tradition of Western music has become the most influential in the world. Western notions of melody and harmony have been spread far afield, first by a process of conquest and colonization that began in the Middle Ages, and later by the global influence of technologies - especially those of mass communication - that were developed in Europe and America. In a vast number of different cultures, children are set to study Occidental musical instruments, such as the piano or violin, to approach the performance of works by the 'Great Composers'. This book is the first attempt to trace the rise and consolidation of singers and their art in the Christian West. It begins in the New Testament period and ends in twelfth-century Europe when churches, hospitals and monasteries shared a body of vocal music, including Gregorian Chant, that was sung hour by hour, day by day, from Ireland to the first crusading kingdoms in the Levant. The history of the singers who performed it is here placed against the social, political and economic life of a Western Europe slowly being remade after the collapse of Roman power. The unfolding story, with its generous illustrations, will be of interest to historians, musicologists, performing musicians and the general reader keen to explore the beginnings of Western musical art.

  • For All the World to See - Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

    In 1955, shortly after Emmett Till was murdered by white supremacists in Mississippi, his grieving mother distributed to the press a gruesome photograph of his mutilated corpse. Asked why she would do this, she explained that by witnessing with their own eyes the brutality of segregation and racism, Americans would be more likely to support the cause of racial justice. 'Let the world see what I've seen', was her reply. The publication of the photograph inspired a generation of activists to join the civil rights movement. Despite this extraordinary episode, the story of visual culture's role in the modern civil rights movement is rarely included in its history. This is the first comprehensive examination of the ways images mattered in the struggle, and it investigates a broad range of media including photography, television, film, magazines, newspapers and advertising. These images were ever present and diverse: the startling footage of Southern white aggression and black suffering that appeared night after night on television news programmes; the photographs of black achievers and martyrs in Negro periodicals; the humble snapshot, no less powerful in its ability to edify and motivate. In each case, the war against racism was waged through pictures - millions of points of light, millions of potent weapons that forever changed a nation. Through vivid storytelling and incisive analysis, this powerful book allows us to see and understand the crucial role that visual culture played in forever changing a nation.

  • Caught in the Web of Words - James Murray & the Oxford English Dictionary

    This unique and celebrated biography describes how a largely self-educated boy from a small village in Scotland entered the world of scholarship and became the first editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, and a lexicographer greater by far than Dr. Johnson. It also provides an absorbing account of how the dictionary was written, the personalities of the people working on it, and the endless difficulties which nearly led to the whole enterprise being abandoned.

  • Temas Del Comercio Y La Economia en La Naraativa Hispana

    Through a study of literature, the social and cultural issues that help form the identity of a people can be revealed and examined. The ten essays in Temas del comercio y la economia en la narrativa hispana investigate the relation between the Hispanic narrative and the economic and commercial concerns of Spanish-speaking peoples around the world from a variety of historical periods. Balancing a study of writers' perspectives on current economic conditions with a look at literary versions of economic events, this anthology provides a window into Hispanic culture for both the student of Hispanic literature and the student of business in the Spanish-speaking markets.

    The essays in Temas del comercio y la economia en la narrativa hispana embrace an interdisciplinary approach and address topics as diverse as the attitude toward businessmen and the accumulation of wealth, the popular reaction against foreign investment, the role of women in a commercial context, the plight of Latino immigrants in the United States, and the social distortions created by rampant consumerism.

    Readers interested in Hispanic literature or international business will find useful tools accompanying each essay, including

    • questions for comprehension,
    • themes for discussion,
    • post-reading exercises,
    • extensive bibliographies for further study,
    • web addresses for organizations in the Spanish-speaking world.

    Temas del comercio y la economia en la narrativa hispana will provide students in a wide range of disciplines with interesting, new, and perhaps unexpected perspectives on the subject of business and economic activity in Hispanic cultures.

  • Pilgrimage and Buddhist Art

    According to sacred texts, the historical Buddha encouraged his disciples to make pilgrimages to sites associated with his life. As sacred images of the Buddha proliferated over time, it is said that his relics were divided among 84,000 South Asian sites of Buddhist worship, or stupas. This abundance of sacred sites in turn rendered pilgrimage and worship increasingly prominent influences on Asian culture and daily life. 'Pilgrimage and Buddhist Art' employs sacred objects, textiles, sculpture, manuscripts and paintings to discuss the relationship between Buddhist pilgrimage and Asia's artistic production. Accompanying an exhibition of approximately 90 extraordinary objects, many of which have never before been displayed publicly, this book addresses the process of the sacred journey in its entirety, including discussion of pilgrimage motivation, ritual preparation and worship at the sacred destination. Exceptional and visually stunning examples of painted mandalas, reliquaries, prayer wheels and travelling shrines demonstrate that pilgrims and pilgrimage inspired centuries of artistic production and shaped the development of visual culture in Asia. Through insightful essays by a team of scholars, 'Pilgrimage and Buddhist Art' illuminates artwork's complex role in Buddhist culture, in which art serves as a form of memory and a bridge to the spiritual world as well as a functional tool with temporal purposes.

  • Gloucestershire 2 - The Vale & the Forest of Dean Rev Ed

    Most famous for Gloucester Cathedral and Tewkesbury Abbey, this county also boasts intriguing monastic remains at Gloucester, fine houses in stucco and stone in the great Regency spa town of Cheltenham, and post-war suspension bridges reaching over the Severn.

  • How to Read Greek Vases

    How is it possible today to gain insight into the culture that flourished in ancient Greece over 2,500 years ago? Works of art are eloquent intermediaries. This generously illustrated volume provides an introduction to the painted pottery that served specific utilitarian functions and that afforded outstanding artists a medium for depicting their gods and heroes and the details of daily existence. The key to understanding the rich language of the Greek vase is tuning into the interrelation of its function, shape, technique, and subject matter. Notable examples from the Metropolitan Museum's exceptional collection reveal the variety and vitality of the refined forms and masterfully rendered scenes that characterize these engaging works of ancient Greek art.

  • Europe Between the Oceans: Themes and Variations : 9000 BC-AD 1000

    Europe is, in world terms, a relatively minor peninsula attached to the Eurasian land mass, yet it became one of the most innovative regions on the planet, bearing restless adventurers who traversed the globe to trade and often to settle. By the fifteenth century Europe was a driving world force, but the origins of its success have until now remained obscured in prehistory. In this magnificent book, the distinguished archaeologist Barry Cunliffe sees Europe not in terms of states and shifting land boundaries, but as a geographical niche particularly favoured in facing many seas. These and the great transpeninsular rivers ensured a rich diversity of natural resources, and encouraged the interaction of dynamic peoples across networks of communication and exchange. The development of these early Europeans is rooted in complex interplays, shifting balances, geographic and demographic fluidity. Weaving together titanic concepts while remaining sensitive to the specific incidence, this is a tour de force. A bold book of exceptional scholarship and an erudite and engaging narrative, Europe Between the Oceans heralds an entirely new understanding of Old Europe.

  • Oscar Niemeyer

    Born in Rio de Janeiro in 1907, Oscar Niemeyer is recognized as one of the world's most fiercely original architects and the central figure of Brazilian architectural Modernism. The prolific designer of more than 600 buildings, Niemeyer has been in practice for seven decades. Architecture, he declares, must be 'functional, beautiful, and shocking'. Transgressing orthodox Modernist aesthetic doctrine and subverting hegemonic cultural models, his work privileged invention and affirmed spectacle and luxury, pleasure, beauty, and sensuality as legitimate architectural pursuits. This gorgeously illustrated book explores the development of Niemeyer's extraordinary body of ideas and forms as well as his role in the construction of Brazil's modern image and cultural tradition. Through a detailed discussion of his intoxicating experiments in reinforced concrete, the book offers the opportunity to relish the stream of pleasures afforded by Niemeyer's important buildings, including his mid-century projects as chief architect for the new capital of Brasilia, and the spectacular Niteroi Museum of Contemporary Art, completed in 1996. Providing the first comprehensive analysis of Niemeyer's radical work and dissident perspective, Oscar Niemeyer: Curves of Irreverence sheds new light on the route the architect has followed as well as on Brazilian Modernism as a non-conformist project informed by a nationalist and anti-colonialist stance.

  • The Migrant′s Time - Rethinking Art History and Diaspora

    The conditions of alienation and exclusion are inextricably linked to the experience of the migrant. This ground-breaking volume explores both the increasing emergence of the theme of migration as a dominant subject matter in art as well as the ways in which the varied mobilities of a globalized world have radically reshaped art's conditions of production, reception, and display.

    In a wide-ranging selection of essays, fourteen distinguished scholars in the fields of visual studies, art history, literary studies, global studies, and art criticism explore the universality of conditions of global migration and interdependence, inviting a rethinking of existing perspectives in postcolonial, transnational, and diaspora studies, and laying the foundation for empirical and theoretical directions beyond the terms of these traditional frameworks.

  • Sargent and the Sea

    As a young man the American painter John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) was passionate about the sea and deeply knowledgeable about ships and seafaring. Between the ages of 18 and 23, he started his career as a professional painter with a remarkable range of maritime works that form the subject of this exhibition and book. The key works are the two versions of the Oyster Gatherers of Cancale, painted in 1878 on the northern coast of Brittany in France, and the group of studies and sketches around them. The authors relate Sargent's freely handled marine drawings, large and small, to his watercolours, oil sketches, and finished oil paintings of marine subjects. The works demonstrate his transition from a plein-air painter to a tonalist exploring interiors and urban scenes. Also presented is a unique scrapbook, held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, that includes more than 50 drawings and sketches, mostly of sea scenes, and postcards and commercial photography of works of art, architecture and tourist views. This scrapbook provides an intimate glimpse at the thoughts and experiences of the young artist on his first European voyage.

  • The Empire′s New Clothes - A History of the Russian Fashion Industry 1700-1917

    In 1701, Tsar Peter the Great decreed that all residents of Moscow must abandon their traditional dress and wear European fashion. Those who produced or sold Russian clothing would face 'dreadful punishment'. Peter's dress decree, part of his drive to make Russia more like Western Europe, had a profound impact on the history of Imperial Russia. This engrossing book explores the impact of Westernization on Russia in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and presents a wealth of photographs of ordinary Russians in all their finery. Christine Ruane draws on memoirs, mail-order catalogues, fashion magazines, and other period sources to demonstrate that Russia's adoption of Western fashion had symbolic, economic, and social ramifications and was inseparably linked to the development of capitalism, industrial production, and new forms of communication. This book shows how the fashion industry became a forum through which Russians debated and formulated a new national identity.

  • Themes in Contemporary Art V 4

    In this fourth volume of the Art of the Twentieth Century series, the contributors address a fascinating variety of themes relating to art from the 1960s to the end of the century--the period of "postmodernism."

    The first of the book's seven chapters deals with the emergence in the 1960s of what has been called an "expanded field" for art activity. Other chapters discuss the consequences of Conceptual art for notions of the aesthetic; the Post-Conceptual practice of painting; practices of Post-Conceptual photography; video, performance, and installation art; and women's practice and the question of gendered and nongendered objects. The final chapter explores the globalization of art at the end of the twentieth century. Full color illustrations are featured throughout the volume.

  • Print the Legend - Photography and the American West

    A compelling story of how the new medium of photography and the new American frontier came of age together--illustrated with scores of stunning images

    This prize-winning book tells the intertwined stories of photography and the American West--a new medium and a new place that came of age together in the nineteenth century.

    "Excellent . . . rewarding . . . a provocative look at the limits of photography as recorder of history--and its role in perpetuating myth."--Chris Vognar, Dallas Morning News

    "A sophisticated and engaging exploration of photography and the West . . . A really handsome work."--James McWilliams, Austin Chronicle

    "A wonderful book."--Vernon Peter, Sunday Oregonian

    "A deliciously intelligent new book . . . so engrossing you can't stop reading."--Michael More, Albuquerque Journal

    "Print the Legend belongs on that short shelf of essential books about the American West."--James P. Ronda, University of Tulsa

  • Perpetual Glory - Medieval Islamic Ceramics from the Harvey B. Plotnick Collection

    Renowned for their technical inventiveness, variety, and beauty, Islamic ceramics first began to flourish in the medieval period. This handsome book presents over one hundred works from the unparalleled Harvey B. Plotnick Collection and documents the extraordinary achievements in Islamic pottery from the 9th to 14th centuries.
    Focusing on three of the most important types of ceramics produced in Iraq and Iran--lusterware, minai, and underglaze painted wares--the book includes fascinating information on each of the works and an introductory essay that discusses the exalted status that ceramics held in the medieval Islamic world, the developments of various techniques in ceramic production, and the singular importance of this major collection. It also tells the particular story of the development of lusterware from the era of the Abbasids (9th-10th centuries), to the court of the Fatimid rulers in Egypt, to its remarkable artistic expression in Iran in the late 12th century.

  • John Singer Sargent- Portraits of the 1890s - Complete Paintings V 2

    This gorgeous book is the second volume of the definitive catalogue raisonne of the work of the American painter John Singer Sargent (1856-1925). It comprises over one-hundred and fifty formal portraits and portrait sketches in oil and watercolor that he painted between 1889 and 1900. The catalogued works have been grouped into chronological sections, each with its own introduction to set the particular group in context. In addition, an overall introduction places Sargent in the context of European portraiture of the past and of his own time.

    Each work is documented in depth: entries include traditional data about the painting or watercolor; details of the work's provenance, exhibition history and bibliography; a short biography of the sitter; a discussion of the circumstances in which the work was created; and a critical discussion of its subject matter, style, and significance in Sargent's career. With very few exceptions, all the works are reproduced in color. There is also an illustrated inventory of Sargent's studio props and accessories and a cross-referenced checklist of the portraits in which they appear.

  • The Works of Samuel Johnson V21-23 - The Lives of the Poets

    The Lives of the Poets was the crowning achievement of Samuel Johnson's rich and varied literary life. Initially planned as a series of rapid-fire prefaces introducing separate volumes on English poets, Johnson's project evolved into a comprehensive biographical and critical survey of English poetry from the time of Cowley to the time of Gray. Giving free rein to his tastes, interests, likes, and dislikes, Johnson produced both a review of his life of reading in English poetry and an extended discursive statement of his immensely influential literary values.

    This carefully researched three-volume edition of Lives presents a definitive text reflecting Johnson's final wishes for its wording, accompanied by notes of value both to general readers and specialists.

  • Revisiting the Glass House - Contemporary Art and Modern Architecture

    In recent years there has been an enormous interest among emerging and established artists in architecture of the modern period. Revisiting the Glass House explores the ways in which contemporary artists incorporate images of modern buildings in their work as a means to explore the utopian potential of architecture and to provide an antidote to the cynicism of our time.

    The book features painting, photography, video art, and other two-dimensional work by twenty-two artists from around the world whose engagement with architecture has more to do with ideas and ideals than with structure. The artists reimagine the iconic designs of architects such as Walter Gropius, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Le Corbusier, placing their buildings in unlikely locations and repurposing them for a new generation. Through the works of these artists, contributing essayists examine the recent nostalgia for modern architecture and its potential for instigating social change.

  • The Art of Africa - A Resource for Educators + CD and DVD

    By focusing on forty works from the Metropolitan's collection, this educator's resource kit presents the rich and diverse artistic heritage of sub-Saharan Africa. Included are a brief introduction and history of the continent, an explanation of the role of visual expression in Africa, descriptions of the form and function of the works, lesson plans, class activities, map, bibliography, and glossary.

  • Knowing Nature - Art and Science in Philadelphia, 1740-1840

    Philadelphia developed the most active scientific community in early America, fostering an influential group of naturalist-artists, including William Bartram, Charles Willson Peale, Alexander Wilson and John James Audubon, whose work has been addressed by many monographic studies. However, as the groundbreaking essays in 'Knowing Nature' demonstrate, the examination of nature stimulated not only forms of artistic production traditionally associated with scientific practice of the day, but processes of making not ordinarily linked to science. The often surprisingly intimate connections between and among these creative activities and the objects they engendered are explored through the essays in this book, challenging the hierarchy that is generally assumed to have been at play in the study of nature, from the natural sciences through the fine and decorative arts, and, ultimately, popular and material culture. Indeed, the many ways in which the means of knowing nature were reversed - in which artistic and artisanal culture informed scientific interpretations of the natural world - forms a central theme of this pioneering publication.

  • Aethelstan: The First King of England

    In this nuanced portrait of Athelstan, Sarah Foot offers the first full account of the king ever written. She traces his life through the various spheres in which he lived and worked, beginning with the intimate context of his family, then extending outward to his unusual multi-ethnic royal court, the Church and his kingdom, the wars he conducted, and finally his death and legacy. Foot describes a sophisticated man who was not only a great military leader but also a worthy king. He governed brilliantly, developed creative ways to project his image as a ruler, and devised strategic marriage treaties and gift exchanges to cement alliances with the leading royal and ducal houses of Europe.

  • Charlemagne

    Charlemagne--ruler of the vast Frankish kingdom from 768 to his death in 814 and Holy Roman emperor from the year 800--is considered the father of Europe. He founded the first empire in western Europe after the fall of Rome, and his court at Aix-la-Chapelle was a center of classical learning and a focus of the Carolingian Renaissance. This book is a splendid introduction to Charlemagne's life and legend.
    Matthias Becher describes Charlemagne's rise to emperor and traces his political and military maneuvering against the Saxons, the Lombards, and others, as Charlemagne incorporated these lands into his own realm. Becher points out that under Charlemagne, jury courts were introduced, the laws of the Franks revised and written down, new coinage introduced, weights and measures reformed, and a Frankish grammar begun. Charlemagne tried to give his kingdom a spiritual basis by referring to antique traditions, says Becher, and he explores the tensions that existed in Charlemagne's court between modern ideas and traditional thinking. He concludes by discussing Charlemagne's kinship network, the evolving arrangements for his succession, the effects of his reign, and his posthumous fame.
    Concise, insightful, and eminently readable, this biography of Charlemagne provides a wealth of information about a remarkable man and his times.

  • What to Listen for in Rock - A Stylistic Analysis

    In this concise and engaging analysis of rock music, music theorist Ken Stephenson explores the features that make this internationally popular music distinct from earlier music styles. The author offers a guided tour of rock music from the 1950s to the present, emphasizing the theoretical underpinnings of the style and, for the first time, systematically focusing not on rock music's history or sociology, but on the structural aspects of the music itself.

    What structures normally happen in rock music? What theoretical systems or models might best explain them? The book addresses these questions and more in chapters devoted to phrase rhythm, scales, key determination, cadences, harmonic palette and succession, and form. Each chapter provides richly detailed analyses of individual rock pieces from groups including Chicago; the Beatles; Emerson, Lake, and Palmer; Kansas; and others. Stephenson shows how rock music is stylistically unique, and he demonstrates how the features that make it distinct have tended to remain constant throughout the past half-century and within most substyles. For music students at the college level and for practicing rock musicians who desire a deeper understanding of their music, this book is an essential resource.

  • Investigative Pathways - Patterns and Stages in the Careers of Experimental Scientists

    This fascinating book is an investigation of scientific creativity. Following the research pathways of outstanding scientists over the past three centuries, it finds common features in their careers and their landmark discoveries and sheds light on the nature of long-term experimental research.
    Frederic Lawrence Holmes begins by discussing various approaches to the historical study of scientific practice. He then explains three kinds of analysis of the individual scientific life: broad-scale, which examines the phases of a scientist's career--apprenticeship, mastery, distinction, and maturity--over a lifetime; middle-scale, which explores the episodes within such a career; and fine-scale, which scrutinizes laboratory notebooks and other data to focus on the daily interplay between thought and operation.
    Using these analyses, Holmes presents rich examples from his studies of six preeminent scientists: Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier, Claude Bernard, Hans Krebs, Matthew Meselson, Franklin Stahl, and Seymour Benzer. The similar themes that he finds in their work and careers lead him to valuable insights into enduring issues and problems in understanding the scientific process.

  • Varieties of Modernism - Open University Art of the Twentieth Centrury Series V 3

    his book, the third in the Art of the Twentieth Century series, considers works of art produced in Europe and the United States between the 1930s and the 1960s. Arranged in four main parts, the abundantly illustrated book begins by examining aspects of the European avant-garde from the 1930s to the aftermath of the Second World War. The second part focuses on the emerg ence of Abstract Expressionism in the U.S., in particular the work of Jackson Pollock and important critics. Part three looks at "autonomous" high modernism of the early to mid-1960s and the contemporary, related modernist theorization of photography. The final part of the book addresses the reemergence in the 1950s and 1960s of the concerns of the 1920 avant-gardes operating in the so-called "gap between art and life."

  • Solomon - The Lure of Wisdom

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, an intriguing and unconventional biography about one of the Bible's most elusive figures

    Tradition has it that King Solomon knew everything there was to know--the mysteries of nature, of love, of God himself--but what do we know of him? Esteemed biblical scholar Steven Weitzman reintroduces readers to Solomon's story and its surprising influence in shaping Western culture, and he also examines what Solomon's life, wisdom, and writings have come to mean for Jews, Christians, and Muslims over the past two thousand years.

    Weitzman's Solomon is populated by a colorful cast of ambitious characters--Byzantine emperors, explorers, rabbis, saints, scientists, poets, archaeologists, trial judges, reggae singers, and moviemakers among them--whose common goal is to unearth the truth about Solomon's life and wisdom. Filled with the Solomonic texts of the Bible, along with lesser-known magical texts and other writings, this book challenges both religious and secular assumptions. Even as it seeks to tell the story of ancient Israel's greatest ruler, this insightful book is also a meditation on the Solomonic desire to know all of life's secrets, and on the role of this desire in world history.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • The Escorial - Art and Power in the Renaissance

    Few buildings have played so central a role in Spain's history as the monastery-palace of San Lorenzo del Escorial. Colossal in size and imposing - even forbidding - in appearance, the Escorial has invited and defied description for four centuries. Part palace, part monastery, part mausoleum, it has also served as a shrine, a school, a repository for thousands of relics, and one of the greatest libraries of its time. Constructed over the course of more than twenty years, the Escorial challenged and provoked, becoming for some a symbol of superstition and oppression, for others a 'wonder of the world'. Now a World Heritage Site, it is visited by thousands of travellers every year. In this intriguing study, Henry Kamen looks at the circumstances that brought the young Philip II to commission construction of the Escorial in 1563. He explores Philip's motivation, the influence of his travels, the meaning of the design, and its place in Spanish culture. It represents a highly engaging narrative of the high point of Spanish imperial dominance, in which contemporary preoccupations with art, religion, and power are analyzed in the context of this remarkable building.

  • Eero Saarinen : Shaping the future

    From the swooping concrete vaults of the TWA Terminal at JFK Airport to the 630-foot-tall Gateway Arch in St. Louis, the iconic designs of Eero Saarinen (1910-1961) captured the aspirations and values of mid-20th-century America. Potent expressions of national power, these and other Saarinen-designed structures--including the GM Technical Center, Dulles International Airport, and John Deere headquarters--helped create the international image of the United States in the decades following World War II.

    Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future offers a new and wide-ranging look at the entire scope of Saarinen's career. This is the first book on Saarinen to incorporate significant research and materials from the newly available archives of his office, and includes the most complete portfolio of Saarinen's projects to date--a chronological survey of more than 100 built and unbuilt works, previously unpublished photographs, plans, and working drawings.

    Lavishly illustrated, this major study shows how Saarinen gave his structures an expressive dimension and helped introduce modern architecture to the mainstream of American practice. In his search for a richer and more varied modern architecture, Saarinen became one of the most prolific and controversial practitioners of his time.

  • The Iceman Cometh

    Eugene O'Neill was the first American playwright to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. He completed The Iceman Cometh in 1939, but he delayed production until after the war, when it enjoyed a long run of performances in 1946 after receiving mixed reviews. Three years after O'Neill's death, Jason Robards starred in a Broadway revival that brought new critical attention to O'Neill's darkest and most nihilistic play. In the half century since, The Iceman Cometh has gained enormously in stature, and many critics now recognize it as one of the greatest plays in American drama. The Iceman Cometh focuses on a group of alcoholics and misfits who endlessly discuss but never act on their dreams, and Hickey, the traveling salesman determined to strip them of their pipe dreams.

  • The Lonely Crowd - A Study of the Changing American Character

    The Lonely Crowd isconsidered by many to be the most influential book of the twentieth century. Its now-classic analysis of the "new middle class" in terms of inner-directed and other-directed social character opened exciting new dimensions in our understanding of the psychological, political, and economic problems that confront the individual in contemporary American society. The 1969 abridged and revised edition of the book is now reissued with a new foreword by Todd Gitlin that explains why the book is still relevant to our own era.

    "As accessible as it is acute, The Lonely Crowd isindispensable reading for anyone who wishes to understand American society. After half a century, this book has lost none of its capacity to make sense of how we live." --Todd Gitlin

    Praise for the earlier editions:

    "One of the most penetrating and comprehensive views of the twentieth-century urban American you're likely to find." --Commonweal

    "Brilliant and original." --Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.

  • The Sculpture of Louise Nevelson - Constructing a Legend

    Louise Nevelson (1900-1988) was a towering figure in postwar American art, exerting great influence with her monumental installations, innovative sculptures made of found objects, and celebrated public artworks. 'The Sculpture of Louise Nevelson' focuses on all phases of the artist's remarkable ascent to the top of the art world, from her groundbreaking works of the 1940s to complex pieces completed in the late 1980s. The most extensive study of Nevelson to be published in over 20 years, this beautifully illustrated book also demonstrates how Nevelson's flamboyant style and carefully cultivated persona enhanced her reputation as an artist of the first rank. Essays by distinguished scholars examine a wide variety of important issues and themes throughout Nevelson's career, including the role of monochromatic colour in her painted wooden sculpture; the art-historical context of her work; her acclaimed large-scale commissioned artworks, which established her as a central figure in the public art revival of the late 1960s; and her 'self-fashioning' as a celebrated artist, particularly her origins as a Ukrainian-born Jewish immigrant to the United States. An illustrated chronology and exhibition history accompany the text. Published in conjunction with the first major exhibition of Nevelson's work in America since 1980, this book provides essential information on and insights into the study of a revolutionary 20th-century artist.

  • Architect and Engineer - A Study in Sibling Rivalry

    A fascinating look at how architects and engineers work together, from medieval times to the present day.

    How architects and engineers relate to one another has long been debated but never before addressed over a broad span of history. There are many controversial issues: about professional demarcation, about credit for design, about the value we attach to art in buildings, and about how that connects with advances in technique and efficiency.

    This pioneering and handsomely illustrated book enquires for the first time into the pattern of these relationships since the Renaissance. Concentrating particularly on Britain, France and the United States, Architect and Engineer looks at what has actually taken place when architecture and engineering have interlocked. It examines projects ranging from the building of Waterloo Bridge to the evolution of the Chicago skyscraper, and personalities from Vauban to Brunel and Wright.

    The results of this impartial investigation may often surprise and provoke the reader. It is a study that has radical implications for the compartmentalized ways in which the history of architecture and construction has conventionally been addressed.

  • Turkmen Jewelry - Silver Ornaments from the Marshall and Marilyn Wolf Collection

    The Turkmen people of Central Asia and Iran are revered for their carpets and textiles. Less well known, but equally stunning, is the extraordinary silver jewelry created by Turkmen tribal craftsmen and urban silversmiths throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries. This catalogue presents nearly two hundred pieces in glorious detail, ranging from crowns and headdresses to armbands and rings, and featuring accents of carnelian, turquoise, and other stones.

    Characterized by elegant form, geometric shapes, and delicate openwork, Turkmen jewelry has typically been viewed through an ethnographic rather than an aesthetic lens. By highlighting these objects--which come from one of the most significant private collections of Turkmen ornaments in the world--and placing them in the larger context of Islamic art, this groundbreaking publication elevates the vibrant, monumental pieces from folk art to fine art.

  • Anne Vallayer-Coster - Painter to the Court of Marie Antoinette

    Anne Vallayer-Coster (1744-1818) was one of the most talented still-life painters of the French school. Her exquisite paintings, today located in some of the world's finest museums, were admired and collected by many of her contemporaries, including Marie Antoinette, who became the artist's most important patron.

  • Chinese Ceramics - From the Paleolithic Period to the Qing Dynasty

    This lavishly illustrated catalogue is a comprehensive historical review of Chinese ceramics covering newly excavated discoveries from the Paleolithic era thousands of years ago to the end of the Qing dynasty in 1911. Throughout Chinas history there has been an ongoing practice of invention and innovation in the forms, materials, decorations, and functions of ceramics made in China, both for the domestic market and for its ever-growing trade with foreign markets. The creation of ceramic ware holds a special and very important place among the many arts and inventions that characterize Chinese culture, society, and civilization. The product of a ten-year collaboration among eminent American, Chinese, and Japanese scholars, the volume offers a new perspective in interpreting the oldest and one of the most admired Chinese art forms, from its technological aspects to its aesthetic value. The volume includes a chapter on Chinese export ceramics that delves into Chinese trade activities and ceramic wares made for export as well as a chapter about the authenticity of Chinese ceramics, discussing issues related to connoisseurship of this Chinese art. As author He Li writes, Despite the rich variety of Chinese ceramics around the world, no fully illustrated, photographed survey of a complete history has been attempted in English. This volume will convey the excitement of encountering these specially chosen examples for the first time.

  • The Art of Mu Xin - The Landscape Paintings & Prison Notes

    Mu Xin (b. 1927) is one of the leading artist-intellectuals of the Chinesediaspora. Now living in New York City, he is known for his complex writings and paintings. A formidable figure in the cultural and intellectual history of Chinese modernism, Mu Xin is admired for his unique synthesis of Chinese and Western aesthetic sensibilities and intellectual traditions. This beautifully illustrated catalogue focuses on a group of thirty-three landscape paintings that Mu Xin painted between 1977 and 1979, in the immediate aftermath of the Cultural Revolution. Many of these works have never been exhibited or published in the West. In addition, the book features Mu Xin's Prison Notes, sixty-six sheets that were written when the artist was in solitary confinement in China in 1971-72.

    This catalogue will accompany an exhibition on view at the Yale University Art Gallery from October 2 to December 9, 2001. The exhibition will then travel to the David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago from January 24 through March 31, 2002, at the Honolulu Academy of Art from October 2 to December 1, 2002 and at the Asia Society in New York City. Other venues to be anounced.

  • Dilemma of the Modern in Japanese Fiction

    This book looks at modernity in Japanese literary culture as a continuing historical dynamic rather than as merely the product of the intense Westernization of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Comparing readings from the eleventh to the twentieth centuries, Washburn argues that modernity in Japan can be understood in terms of cultural conflict-not only Japan versus the West but also Japan's present versus its past. "An ambitious and courageous effort to address the question of what constitutes the 'modern' in Japanese literary history and how it relates to what is 'Japanese.' An important contribution to the field."-Ken K. Ito, University of Michigan "The book . . . covers an impressive range of authors and topics sensitively and eloquently. Washburn's familiarity with his materials is considerable, so his chapters might serve as intelligent introductions to representative writers and texts."-Irmela Hijiya-Kirschnereit, Free University, Berlin, Modern Language Quarterly

  • Moses Mendelssohn

    The German Socrates, Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was the most influential Jewish thinker of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A Berlin celebrity and a major figure in the Enlightenment, revered by Immanuel Kant, Mendelssohn suffered the indignities common to Jews of his time while formulating the philosophical foundations of a modern Judaism suited for a new age. His most influential books included the groundbreaking Jerusalem and a translation of the Bible into German that paved the way for generations of Jews to master the language of the larger culture. Feiners book is the first that offers a full, human portrait of this fascinating man - uncommonly modest, acutely aware of his task as an intellectual pioneer, shrewd, traditionally Jewish, yet thoroughly conversant with the world around him - providing a vivid sense of Mendelssohns daily life as well as of his philosophical endeavours. Feiner, a leading scholar of Jewish intellectual history, examines Mendelssohn as father and husband, as a friend (Mendelssohns long-standing friendship with the German dramatist Gotthold Ephraim Lessing was seen as a model for Jews and non-Jews worldwide), as a tireless advocate for his people, and as an equally indefatigable spokesman for the paramount importance of intellectual independence.

  • The Public Domain - Enclosing the Commons of the Mind

    In this enlightening book James Boyle describes what he calls the range wars of the information age - today's heated battles over intellectual property. Boyle argues that just as every informed citizen needs to know at least something about the environment or civil rights, every citizen should also understand intellectual property law. Why? Because intellectual property rights mark out the ground rules of the information society, and today's policies are unbalanced, unsupported by evidence, and often detrimental to cultural access, free speech, digital creativity, and scientific innovation.Boyle identifies as a major problem the widespread failure to understand the importance of the public domain - the realm of material that everyone is free to use and share without permission or fee. The public domain is as vital to innovation and culture as the realm of material protected by intellectual property rights, he asserts, and he calls for a movement akin to the environmental movement to preserve it. With a clear analysis of issues ranging from Jefferson's philosophy of innovation to musical sampling, synthetic biology and Internet file sharing, this timely book brings a positive new perspective to important cultural and legal debates. If we continue to enclose the 'commons of the mind', Boyle argues, we will all be the poorer.

  • The Railway - Art in the Age of Steam

    Steam locomotives gripped the imagination when they first appeared in nineteenth-century Europe and America. Aboard these great machines, passengers travelled at faster speeds than ever before while watching the scenery transform itself and take on new forms. Common notions of time and space were forever changed. Through vivid illustrations and engaging texts, The Railway: Art in the Age of Steam captures both the fear and excitement of early train travel as it probes the artistic response to steam locomotion within its social setting. Featuring paintings, photography, prints, and posters, the book includes numerous masterpieces by 19th- and 20th-century artists, including J. M. W. Turner, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Charles Sheeler, and Edward Hopper. With its wide variety of themes - landscape painting, the conquest of the West, Impressionism, issues of social class, Modernism, the aesthetics of the machine, and environmental concerns - this work promises an exhilarating journey for both train and art enthusiasts and for anyone interested in one of the industrial ages defining achievements. Published in association with The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, and Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool.

  • Coming of Age in Ancient Greece - Images of Childhood from the Classical Past

    What was childhood like in ancient Greece? What activities and games did Greek children embrace? How were they schooled and what religious and ceremonial rites of passage were key to their development? These fascinating questions and many more are answered in this groundbreaking book--the first English-language study to feature and discuss imagery and artifacts relating to childhood in ancient Greece.Coming of Age in Ancient Greece shows that the Greeks were the first culture to represent children and their activities naturalistically in their art. Here we learn about depictions of children in myth as well as life, from infancy to adolescence. This beautifully illustrated book features such archaeological artifacts as toys and gaming pieces alongside images of them in use by children on ancient vases, coins, terracotta figurines, bronze and stone sculpture, and marble grave monuments. Essays by eminent scholars in the fields of Greek social history, literature, archaeology, anthropology, and art history discuss a wide range of topics, including the burgeoning role of childhood studies in interdisciplinary studies; the status of children in Greek culture; the evolution of attitudes toward children from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period as documented by literature and art; the relationships of fathers and sons and mothers and daughters; and the roles of cult practice and death in a child's existence.This delightful book illuminates what is most universal and specific about childhood in ancient Greece and examines childhood's effects on Greek life and culture, the foundation on which Western civilization has been based.

  • An Empire of Ice - Scott, Shackleton and the Heroic Age of Antarctic Science

    Published to coincide with the centenary of the first expeditions to reach the South Pole, An Empire of Ice presents a fascinating new take on Antarctic exploration. Retold with added information, it's the first book to place the famed voyages of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, his British rivals Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton, and others in a larger scientific, social, and geopolitical context. Efficient, well prepared, and focused solely on the goal of getting to his destination and back, Amundsen has earned his place in history as the first to reach the South Pole. Scott, meanwhile, has been reduced in the public mind to a dashing incompetent who stands for little more than relentless perseverance in the face of inevitable defeat. An Empire of Ice offers a new perspective on the Antarctic expeditions of the early twentieth century by looking at the British efforts for what they actually were: massive scientific enterprises in which reaching the South Pole was but a spectacular sideshow. By focusing on the larger purpose, Edward Larson deepens our appreciation of the explorers' achievements, shares little-known stories, and shows what the Heroic Age of Antarctic discovery was really about.

  • The Polish Revolution: Solidarity

    "One of the most brilliant and illuminating interpreters of modern eastern Europe . . . a wonderfully vivid writer . . . He reaches the parts that others do not reach."--Richard Davy, The Times

    "The best single account of what happened--and why."--Newsweek

    The definitive account of Solidarity's spectacular rise and tragic fall . . . a book to set the record straight . . . amply documented, indispensable."--John Darnton, New York Times Book Review

    A brilliant eyewitness and analyst, Timothy Garton Ash in this book offers a gripping account of the Polish shipyard workers who defied their communist rulers in 1980. He describes the emergence of the improbable leader Lech Walesa, the ensuing tumult that culminated in martial law, and--for this updated edition--the fate of the Solidarity movement in subsequent years.



  • Neohoodoo - Art for a Forgotten Faith

    'NeoHooDoo', a phrase coined by the poet Ishmael Reed in 1970, celebrates the practice of rituals, folklore, and spirituality in the Americas beyond the scope of Christianity and organized religion. The endurance of these centuries-old traditions of magic and healing are the unique focus of this book. Exploring how spirituality influenced artists in the late 20th century and bringing together an intergenerational group of artists from North, Central, and South America, NeoHooDoo reveals the wider implications of ritualized practice in contemporary art. This book examines the work of thirty-five artists, including Jimmie Durham, David Hammons, Jose Bedia, Rebecca Belmore and James Lee Byars, who began using ritualistic practices during the 1970s and 1980s as a way of reinterpreting aspects of their cultural heritage. Younger artists such as Tania Bruguera and Michael Joo are shown to have drawn upon the iconography of ritual. The original essays, which range over artistic use of ritual as a form of therapy, catharsis, or political critique, stand alongside contributions from 'NeoHooDoo's key sources of inspiration: Robert Farris Thompson, Ishmael Reed, and Quincy Troupe.

  • Inside Hitlers Greece - The Experience of Occupation 1941-44

    In April 1941 the German army invaded Greece, leading to four years of hideous barbarism and to a civil war that tore the country apart. Inside Hitler's Greece explores the impact of the Occupation upon the lives and values of ordinary Greeks. Drawing on a wealth of first-hand accounts and previously untapped archival sources Mark Mazower offers a vividly human picture of the experiences of resistance fighters and black marketeers, teenage German conscripts and Gestapo officers. He shows how war threw traditional family roles into question as women became breadwinners and children took up arms. The moral complexities of life under foreign rule are linked to the unfolding political tragedy that brought the civil war. The book describes the economic exploitation of Greece and the resulting famine - the disintegration of an entire society and the origins of mass resistance. It offers an unsentimental account of the realities of guerrilla life in the mountains, covering the psychological as well as the material effects of total war. But the war is also seen through German eyes: soldiers, diplomats, and SS officials speak in their own words, allowing us to understand the beliefs and values that underlay Nazi policies of violence, terror, and extermination. From staff officers like the young Kurt Waldheim to ordinary Bavarian conscripts, the German Occupation apparatus is brought to life in unprecedented detail. A world of ruined villages and stirring revolutionary utopias, abandoned Jewish homes and starving islanders - the world of Hitler's New Order - is comprehensively analyzed and set in its historical context.

  • Anglomania - Tradition and Transgression in British Fashion

    Anglomania, the craze for all things English, gripped Europe during the mid-to-late 18th century. As perceived by Anglophiles such as Voltaire and Montesquieu, England was a land of reason, freedom, and tolerance, a place where the Enlightenment found its greatest expression. What began as an intellectual phenomenon, however, became and has remained a matter of style. Through the lens of fashion, AngloMania examines aspects of English culture, such as class, sport, royalty, pageantry, eccentricity, the gentleman, and the country garden, which have fuelled the European and American imagination. This beautiful book presents historical costumes juxtaposed with late 20th- and early 21st-century fashions by Hussein Chalayan, John Galliano, Stephen Jones, Shaun Leane, Alexander McQueen, Philip Treacy, and Vivienne Westwood. As with the hugely successful exhibition "Dangerous Liaisons: Fashion and Furniture in the 18th Century" at the Metropolitan Museum, the clothing is styled as a series of thematic vignettes in the Museum's English Period Rooms. This book comprises photographs of the installations along with text written by Andrew Bolton. From AngloMania, we learn that Englishness is a romantic construct based on fictive and imaginary narratives. In terms of fashion, these narratives emerge as ones that are satirical, nostalgic, theatrical, and like the English weather, at once indomitable and unpredictable.

  • Moral Panic: Changing Concepts of the Child Molester in Modern America

    It is commonly acknowledged that sexual abuse of children is a grave and pervasive problem and that child molesters are predators who compulsively repeat their crimes and have little hope of cure. Yet as recently as twenty years ago many experts viewed the problem far less seriously, declaring that molestation was a very rare offense and that molesters were merely confused individuals unlikely to repeat their offenses. Over the past century, opinion has fluctuated between these radically different perspectives. This timely book traces shifting social responses to adult sexual contacts with children, whether this involves molestation by strangers or incestuous acts by family members. The book explores how and why concern about the sexual offender has fluctuated in North America since the late nineteenth century.
    Philip Jenkins argues that all concepts of sex offenders and offenses are subject to social, political, and ideological influences and that no particular view of offenders represents an unchanging objective reality. He examines the various groups (including mass media) who have been active in promoting particular constructions of the emerging problem, the impact of public attitudes on judicial and legislative responses to these crimes, and the ways in which demographic change, gender politics, and morality campaigns have shaped public opinion. While not minimizing sexual abuse of children, the book thus places reactions to the problem in a broad political and cultural context.

  • Northern Clerkenwell and Pentonville - Survey of London V47

    Clerkenwell is one of the most varied, intricate and richly historic districts of Englands capital city. Its choice for study by the Survey of London is a mark both of its age-old fascination and of its contemporary appeal. Today Southern Clerkenwell, just north of the City, has become a fashionable location. It houses many in the creative industries, its restaurants and bars are thronged, and its population has been rising for two decades. Northern Clerkenwell, by contrast, has long been acknowledged as having some of Londons best Georgian housing and urban landscapes. There is also an intriguingly mixed quarter beyond the Angel and Pentonville Road, reaching north into Islington. The two parts of Clerkenwell are covered separately in these two interlinked volumes, which are available either separately or as a pair. Clerkenwells present prosperity is rooted in its past. Its density of development, its patterns of land-use and its street layout are witnesses to an unbroken history, going back to monastic foundations. Within the compass of the present volumes, the Survey of London brings together the riches of the area, aiming to omit nothing of significance old or new. In so doing it has created a practical record in words and images of enduring value and usefulness for planners, residents, historians and the wider public. These volumes are the latest in the parish series published at regular intervals over the past hundred years by the Survey of London. They mark several new departures for the Survey. They are the first to be published by Yale University Press, under the sponsorship of the Paul Mellon Centre, and the first to have photographs integrated with the text alongside the handsome architectural drawings for which the series is famed. They also make widespread use of colour images for the first time. Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

  • Moshe Dayan - Plow and Sword

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a vivid portrait of one of the most powerful leaders in Israel's first decades of statehood

    Instantly recognizable with his iconic eye patch, Moshe Dayan (1915-1981) was one of Israel's most charismatic--and controversial--personalities. As a youth he earned the reputation of a fearless warrior, and in later years as a leading military tactician, admired by peers and enemies alike. As chief of staff during the 1956 Sinai Campaign and as minister of defense during the 1967 Six Day War, Dayan led the Israel Defense Forces to stunning military victories. But in the aftermath of the bungled 1973 Yom Kippur War, he shared the blame for operational mistakes and retired from the government. He later proved himself a principled and talented diplomat, playing an integral role in peace negotiations with Egypt.

    In this memorable biography, Mordechai Bar-On, Dayan's IDF bureau chief, offers an intimate view of Dayan's private life, public career, and political controversies, set against an original analysis of Israel's political environment from pre-Mandate Palestine through the early 1980s. Drawing on a wealth of Israeli archives, accounts by Dayan and members of his circle, and firsthand experiences, Bar-On reveals Dayan as a man unwavering in his devotion to Zionism and the Land of Israel. Moshe Dayan makes a unique contribution to the history of Israel and the complexities of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • Proust - The Future`s Secret

    Marcel Proust came into his own as a novelist comparatively late in life, yet only Shakespeare, Balzac, Dickens, Tolstoy, and Dostoyevsky were his equals when it came to creating characters as memorably human. As biographer Benjamin Taylor suggests, Proust was a literary lightweight before writing his multivolume masterwork In Search of Lost Time, but following a series of momentous historical and personal events, he became-against all expectations-one of the greatest writers of his, and indeed any, era. This insightful, beautifully written biography examines Proust's artistic struggles-the 'search' of the subtitle-and stunning metamorphosis in the context of his times. Taylor provides an in-depth study of the author's life while exploring how Proust's personal correspondence and published works were greatly informed by his mother's Judaism, his homosexuality, and such dramatic events as the Dreyfus Affair and, above all, World War I. As Taylor writes in his prologue, 'Proust's Search is the most encyclopedic of novels, encompassing the essentials of human nature...His account, running from the early years of the Third Republic to the aftermath of World War I, becomes the inclusive story of all lives, a colossal mimesis. To read the entire Search is to find oneself transfigured and victorious at journey's end, at home in time and in eternity too.'

  • Robert Motherwell Paintings and Collages - A Catalogue Raisonne 1941-1991

    Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) was one of the preeminent Abstract Expressionists and a spokesperson for that generation of artists. During a career that lasted half a century, he created a large and varied body of work, constantly reinventing and refining his signature motifs. He produced some of the most innovative and profound imagery of the 20th century, such as the Elegy to the Spanish Republic, Iberia, Open, and Summertime in Italy series, as well as one of the largest and most inventive oeuvres in collage.

    This monumental catalogue raisonne documents 1,209 paintings on canvas and panel, 722 paintings on paper, and 889 collages, providing extensive information about each work. In the first volume, the authors present an overview of Motherwell's career, and discuss key topics including the tension between figuration and abstraction in his work, his role as a spokesperson for modernism, and the changing nature of the critical reception of his work. This volume also contains a richly detailed, illustrated chronology of his life. Exquisitely designed and produced, this catalogue will be the definitive reference on Robert Motherwell's paintings and collages for years to come.

  • Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates - Reconstructing Urban Landscapes

    Instilling a poetics of place is a goal of Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA), the famous landscape design firm that has created successful public spaces in some of the country's most challenging urban sites. In these locations, nature offers not so much an escape from city living as a teasing dialogue with built structures. The whole experience is aimed, as critic Paul Goldberger notes, to 'make you see everything, city and nature alike, with a striking intensity'. Richly illustrated and handsomely designed, this is the first publication to explore a wide range of MVVA's projects, focusing on the firm's trend toward sites requiring complex technological solutions. Leading critics and historians look at twelve projects, dating from 1992 to the present, and each presenting a challenge - such as contamination, isolation, and lengthy public approval proceedings. They explore the process through which the firm researches such issues and how solutions are embedded in the final aesthetics and spatial structure of the sites.

  • The Degaev Affair - Terror and Treason in Tsarist Russia

    A committed terrorist in Russia, an admired professor in America: the astounding story of Sergei Degaev's double life, told in full detail for the first time

    Sergei Degaev (1857-1921), a political terrorist in tsarist Russia, disappeared after participating in the assassination of the chief of Russia's security organization in 1883. Those who later knew and admired the quietly brilliant Professor Alexander Pell at the University of South Dakota never guessed this was actually Degaev, who had triple-crossed friends and associates while entangled in the revolutionary movement of his homeland. This book is the first in any language to tell in detail the extraordinary story of one of the world's most intriguing revolutionaries, his role in building and betraying the earliest political terrorist network, and his subsequent conventional academic career in America.

    The well-known historian Richard Pipes uses previously unexplored Russian archives to draw a brilliant psychological, political, and sociological portrait of Degaev. Pipes pursues his protagonist on a twisting journey of changing loyalties and fateful collaborations within the network that provided the model for all modern terrorist organizations. A cunning conspirator, Degaev went on to reinvent himself in the United States as a beloved mathematics professor. Either of his lives would be considered remarkable; that Degaev lived both is nothing short of amazing.

  • Post-Polio Syndrome - A Guide for Polio Survivors & their Families

    The effects of polio that occur decades after the disease has run its course--weakness, fatigue, pain, intolerance to cold, difficulty with breathing and swallowing--are often more devastating than the original disease. This book on the diagnosis and management of polio-related health problems is an essential resource for polio survivors and their families and health care providers.

    Dr. Julie K. Silver, who has both personal and professional experience with post-polio syndrome, begins the book by defining and describing PPS and providing a historical overview of its diagnosis and treatment. Chapters that follow discuss finding good medical care, dealing with symptoms, maintaining proper nutrition and weight, preventing osteoporosis and falls, and sustaining mobility. Dr. Silver reviews the latest in braces, shoes, assistive devices, and wheelchairs and scooters. She also explores issues involving managing pain, surgery, complementary and alternative medicine, safe and comfortable living environments, insurance and disability, and sex and intimacy.

  • Deutsche Wiederholungrammatik - A Morpho-Syntactic Review of German

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  • Art of Edo Japan - The Artist and the City 1615-1868

    This beautifully illustrated survey examines the art and artists of the Edo period, one of the great epochs in Japanese art. Together with the imperial city of Kyoto and the port cities of Osaka and Nagasaki, the splendid capital city of Edo (now Tokyo) nurtured a magnificent tradition of painting, calligraphy, printmaking, ceramics, architecture, textile work and lacquer. As each city created its own distinctive social, political and economic environment, its art acquired a unique flavour and aesthetic. Author Christine Guth focuses on the urban aspects of Edo art, including discussions of many of Japan's most popular artists - Korin, Utamaro and Hiroshige, among others - as well as those that are lesser known, and provides a fascinating look at the cities in which they worked.

  • The Woodcut in Fifteeth-Century Europe

    More than a generation before the invention of Gutenberg's celebrated press, the new technology of image printing emerged. In this book, a distinguished group of scholars treats the earliest manifestations of printing in all aspects: technical experimentation, the complex relation of printed books to printed images, individual and institutional patronage, new iconographies, religious propaganda, and the wide variety of private and public ways in which printed images were first employed. The essays examine the technological, social, political, religious, personal, and institutional contexts of fifteenth-century woodcuts and challenge many assumptions about the phenomenon of early printing, including the beginnings of printing on cloth, the significance of monastic production, the development of book printing and book illustration, and the extent to which printing can or should be termed a 'revolution'.

  • The Cave Church of Paul the Hermit - At the Monastery of St. Paul in Eygpt

    The Coptic Monastery of St. Paul by the Red Sea grew up around the cave where Paul, the first Christian hermit, lived in solitude. The cave served as a shrine in late antiquity, became a church in the middle ages, and expanded again in the early modern period. This visually and intellectually exciting book chronicles the history of a series of devotional paintings in the Cave Church. It explores how the monastic community commissioned painting twice in the church in the 13th century, during one of the greatest eras of Coptic art, and how one of the monks painted it again in the 18th century, helping to inaugurate a Coptic renaissance after centuries of decline. The foundation of this volume is a wall painting conservation project sponsored by the American Research Center in Egypt. The book also sets the art and architecture of the Cave Church in its historical context and examines the role of the Monastery of St. Paul as part of the sacred geography of Christian Egypt through time.

  • How Pol Pot Came to Power 2e

    How did Pol Pot, a tyrant comparable to Hitler and Stalin in his brutality and contempt for human life, rise to power? This authoritative book explores what happened in Cambodia from 1930 to 1975, tracing the origins and trajectory of the Cambodian Communist movement and setting the ascension of Pol Pot's genocidal regime in the context of the conflict between colonialism and nationalism. A new preface bring this edition up to date.

  • Liverpool - Pevsner Architectural Guide

    This comprehensive, full-color guidebook describes all the architecturally significant buildings in Liverpool, the city selected as European Capital of Culture for 2008. The book includes suburban areas of interest and excursions to notable sites farther out. Major buildings--such as the Town Hall, St George's Hall, and the two Cathedrals--receive extended treatment; the streets of the business district are dealt with alphabetically; and the rest of the city--including the docks--is covered in a series of carefully planned walks.
    Based on Nikolaus Pevsner's original text for the Buildings of England, the book is augmented by close study of Liverpool's buildings themselves and by extensive new research. It is an authoritative work of reference as well as a practical handbook for visitors and residents walking in the city.

  • Jan Lievens 1607-1674 - A Dutch Master Rediscovered

    Jan Lievens (1607-1674) was one of the most fascinating and enigmatic Dutch artists of the 17th century. Daring and innovative as a painter, printmaker, and draftsman, he created powerful character studies, genre scenes, landscapes, formal portraits, and religious and allegorical images that were widely praised and valued during his lifetime. This beautiful book, the first overview of the full range of Lievens' career, features more than 50 paintings--many of them newly discovered in private collections--and more than 75 prints and drawings, providing a reassessment of his place in the history of art.

    Lievens began his career in his native Leiden, where he worked closely with his compatriot Rembrandt, who admired and collected Lievens' works. Lievens then moved to London, Antwerp, and Amsterdam, and his peripatetic career and multitude of working styles, say the authors of this book, may explain why his reputation today is not as high as it should be. This book offers a necessary corrective, returning to Lievens the esteem he deserves.

  • Existentialism Is a Humanism

    A new translation of two seminal works of existentialism

    It was to correct common misconceptions about his thought that Jean-Paul Sartre, the most dominent European intellectual of the post-World War II decades, accepted an invitation to speak on October 29, 1945, at the Club Maintenant in Paris. The unstated objective of his lecture ("Existentialism Is a Humanism") was to expound his philosophy as a form of "existentialism," a term much bandied about at the time. Sartre asserted that existentialism was essentially a doctrine for philosophers, though, ironically, he was about to make it accessible to a general audience. The published text of his lecture quickly became one of the bibles of existentialism and made Sartre an international celebrity.

    The idea of freedom occupies the center of Sartre's doctrine. Man, born into an empty, godless universe, is nothing to begin with. He creates his essence--his self, his being--through the choices he freely makes ("existence precedes essence"). Were it not for the contingency of his death, he would never end. Choosing to be this or that is to affirm the value of what we choose. In choosing, therefore, we commit not only ourselves but all of mankind. This book presents a new English translation of Sartre's 1945 lecture and his analysis of Camus's The Stranger, along with a discussion of these works by acclaimed Sartre biographer Annie Cohen-Solal. This edition is a translation of the 1996 French edition, which includes Arlette Elkaim-Sartre's introduction and a Q&A with Sartre about his lecture.

  • Hannah Arendt - For Love of the World 2e

    This highly acclaimed, prize-winning biography of one of the foremost political philosophers of the twentieth century is here reissued in a trade paperback edition for a new generation of readers. In a new preface the author offers an account of writings by and about Arendt that have appeared since the book's 1982 publication, providing a reassessment of her subject's life and achievement.

    Praise for the earlier edition:

    "Both a personal and an intellectual biography . . . It represents biography at its best."--Peter Berger, front page, The New York Times Book Review

    "A story of surprising drama . . . . At last, we can see Arendt whole."--Jim Miller, Newsweek
    "Indispensable to anyone interested in the life, the thought, or . . . the example of Hannah Arendt."--Mark Feeney, Boston Globe

    "An adventure story that moves from pre-Nazi Germany to fame in the United States, and . . . a study of the influences that shaped a sharp political awareness."--Richmond (Va.) Times-Dispatch

    Cover drawing by David Schorr

  • Atlas of the Ethno-Political History of the Caucasus

    The Atlas of the Ethno-Political History of the Caucasus is a magnificent collection of fifty-six original maps with commentaries that detail the ethnic, religious, and linguistic makeup of the Caucasus--the region located between the Black and Caspian Seas that contains Europe's highest mountain--from the eighteenth century to the present. The highly detailed maps and text untangle the exceptionally complicated history of this area, poised between Europe and Asia, which has been marked by ethnic conflicts and changing political borders. The Atlas illuminates the conflicting historical visions of homelands and borders, and provides a comprehensive reference tool for scholars, geographers, and historians.

  • Mrs Mattingly′s Miracle - The Prince, The Widow and the Cure that Scocked Washington City

    In 1824 in Washington, D.C., Ann Mattingly, widowed sister of the city's mayor, was miraculously cured of a ravaging cancer. Just days, or perhaps even hours, from her predicted demise, she arose from her sickbed free from agonizing pain and able to enjoy an additional thirty-one years of life. The Mattingly miracle purportedly came through the intervention of a charismatic German cleric, Prince Alexander Hohenlohe, who was credited already with hundreds of cures across Europe and Great Britain. Though nearly forgotten today, Mattingly's astonishing healing became a polarizing event. It heralded a rising tide of anti-Catholicism in the United States that would culminate in violence over the next two decades.

    Nancy L. Schultz deftly weaves analysis of this episode in American social and religious history together with the astonishing personal stories of both Ann Mattingly and the healer Prince Hohenlohe, around whom a cult was arising in Europe. Schultz's riveting book brings to light an early episode in the ongoing battle between faith and reason in the United States.

  • Dance In The Rennaissance - European Fashion, French Obsession

    Dance was at the core of Renaissance social activity in France and had important connections with most major issues of the period. This finely illustrated book provides the first full account of the pivotal place and high status of dance in sixteenth-century French culture and society.

    Margaret M. McGowan examines the diverse forms of dance in the Renaissance, contemporary attitudes toward dance, and the light this throws on moral, political, and aesthetic concerns of the time. Among the subjects she covers are: expectations of dance; style, costume, music, and social coding; court dance versus social dancing; dance and the Valois dynasty; professional dancers, virtuosos, and choreographers; burlesque; opposition to dance; and dance and the people. Nearly one hundred illustrations, many of them rare, accompany the engrossing text.

  • June 1941 - Hitler and Stalin

    A masterful account, culminating in the fateful days before the most decisive event of World War II: Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union

    This brilliant new work by the author of the best-selling Five Days in London, May 1940 is an unparalleled drama of two great leaders confronting each other in June 1941. It describes Hitler and Stalin's strange, calculating, and miscalculating relationship before the German invasion of Soviet Russia, with its gigantic (and unintended) consequences. John Lukacs questions many long-held beliefs; he suggests, for example, that among other things Hitler's first purpose involved England: if Stalin's Communist Russia were to be defeated, Hitler's Third Reich would be well-nigh invincible, and the British and American peoples would be forced to rethink the war against Hitler. The book offers penetrating insights and a new portrait of Hitler and Stalin, moved by their long-lasting inclinations. Yet among other things, Lukacs presents evidence that Hitler (rather than his generals) had moments of dark foreboding before the invasion. Stalin could not, because he wished not, believe that Hitler would choose the risk of a two-front war by attacking him; he was stunned and shocked and came close to a breakdown. But he recovered, grew into a statesman, and eventually became a prime victor of the Second World War. Such are the ironies of history; John Lukacs paints them with a shining narrative skill.

  • Aeronautics at the Mid-Century

    A noted aeronautical engineer here gives his views on the past, present, and future of aviation and its impact on our civilization. He outlines the short but technologically vast history of aeronautics, not forgetting that the airplane was born into a time of political strain to develop into an instrument for evil as well as good. He indicates some of the effects that the increasing range and utility of planes will have on trade, travel, culture, and politics. There is no sound basis, he declares, for the once predicted increase of light airplanes flown for fun, but he does foresee the extensive use of helicopters in the air transport pattern. In the future we shall also see the adoption of jet propulsion for commercial aircraft which will double existing air speeds. Research tends to speed up obsolescence, he finds, but he calls for greater research in aeronautics to guard against becoming a second rate air power. These findings and many others are presented by one of the nation's foremost experts in a volume of substantial interest to the general reader. The book is profusely illustrated with photographs of the planes that have made aviation history.

  • Field Guide to the Birds of Trinidad & Tobago

    Trinidad and Tobago, tropical islands on the continental shelf of northeastern South America, enjoy a rich diversity of bird species, including visitors from the nearby mainland and others traveling the migratory flyway from North America. This compact, portable field guide is designed to provide birders and ornithologists with all the up-to-date information they need to identify birds in the field. The book features color illustrations and descriptions of almost 470 different species--every species known to occur naturally in Trinidad or Tobago as well as those successfully introduced there.

    Following a brief description of the geography, habitats, and climate of the region, the guide offers instructions for identifying birds, watching safely, and discovering the places where particular species are most likely to be found. No resident or visitor to the islands will want to be without this essential guide.

  • Acts of the Apostles

    For anyone interested in the origins of Christianity, Joseph A. Fitzmyer's The Acts of the Apostles is indispensable. Beginning with the Ascension of Christ into heaven, and ending with Paul proclaiming the kingdom of God from a prison in Rome, this New Testament narrative picks up where the Gospel of Luke left off. The Acts of the Apostles is indeed a journey of nearly epic proportions--and one that requires a guide as adept as Fitzmyer.
    Since Acts was most likely written by the same person who composed the Gospel of Luke, it is only fitting that the Anchor Bible Commentaries on these New Testament books should be written by the same author. With The Acts of the Apostles, Fitzmyer gives readers the long-awaited companion to his two-volume commentary on the Gospel of Luke.

    The Four Gospels recount the life and teachings of Jesus, but only the book of the Acts of the Apostles tells the story of what happened after Jesus' departure. In this second of St. Luke's two-volume work, he picks up with Jesus saying farewell to his followers; then Luke tells the fast-paced story of the birth and growth of the early church. This narrative reads like a major breaking news story, with the apostles Peter and Paul as the main characters.

    The interpretation of Acts requires a scholar of the highest quality. As he demonstrates in The Acts of the Apostles, Joseph Fitzmyer not only is up to the task but establishes once again why he is ranked among the world's top biblical scholars. Far from being a rehash of old ideas and well-rehearsed theories, Fitzmyer's commentary distinguishes itself as the capstone of his career, with a new synthesis of all the relevant data from the Roman world to the present. He provides a thorough introduction to the background, text, and context of the book, as well as chapter-by-chapter notes and comments in which are offered insights and answers to questions that have long plagued preachers and parishioners, teachers and students. This commentary is destined to join Fitzmyer's Anchor Bible commentaries on the Gospel According to Luke and the Epistle to the Romans as the most authoritative commentary available on Acts.

  • The Trumpet

    In the first major book devoted to the trumpet in more than two decades, John Wallace and Alexander McGrattan trace the surprising evolution and colourful performance history of one of the world's oldest instruments. They chart the introduction of the trumpet and its family into art music, and its rise to prominence as a solo instrument, from the Baroque 'golden age', through the advent of valved brass instruments in the nineteenth century, and the trumpet's renaissance in the jazz age. The authors offer abundant insights into the trumpet's repertoire, with detailed analyses of works by Haydn, Handel and Bach, and fresh material on the importance of jazz and influential jazz trumpeters for the reemergence of the trumpet as a solo instrument in classical music today. Wallace and McGrattan draw on deep research, lifetimes of experience in performing and teaching the trumpet in its various forms, and numerous interviews to illuminate the trumpet's history, music and players. Copiously illustrated with photographs, facsimiles and musical examples throughout, 'The Trumpet' will enlighten and fascinate all performers and enthusiasts.

  • Ukraine′s Orange Revolution

    HAZIRLANIYOR

  • Explorers of the Nile: The Triumph and Tragedy of a Great Victorian Adventure

    Nothing obsessed explorers of the mid-nineteenth century more than the quest to discover the source of the White Nile. It was the planet's most elusive secret, the prize coveted above all others. Between 1856 and 1876, six larger-than-life men and one extraordinary woman accepted the challenge. Showing extreme courage and resilience, Richard Burton, John Hanning Speke, James Augustus Grant, Samuel Baker, Florence von Sass, David Livingstone, and Henry Morton Stanley risked their lives and reputations in the fierce competition. Award-winning author Tim Jeal deploys fascinating new research to provide a vivid tableau of the unmapped 'Dark Continent', its jungle deprivations, and the courage as well as malicious tactics of the explorers. On multiple forays launched into east and central Africa, the travelers passed through almost impenetrable terrain and suffered the ravages of flesh-eating ulcers, paralysis, malaria, deep spear wounds, and even death. They discovered Lakes Tanganyika and Victoria and became the first white people to encounter the kingdoms of Buganda and Bunyoro. Jeal weaves the story with authentic new detail and examines the tragic unintended legacy of the Nile search that still casts a long shadow over the people of Uganda and Sudan.

  • Kant′s Transcendental Idealism - An Interpretation and Defence Revised and Enlarged

    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature. It includes a new discussion of the Third Analogy, a greatly expanded discussion of Kant's Paralogisms, and entirely new chapters dealing with Kant's theory of reason, his treatment of theology, and the important Appendix to the Dialectic.
    Praise for the earlier edition:

    "Probably the most comprehensive and substantial study of the Critique of Pure Reason written by any American philosopher. . . . This is a splendid book."--Lewis White Beck

    "This masterful study . . . will most certainly join the canon of required reading for future interpreters of Kant's theoretical philosophy. Superbly organized and lucidly written."--Garrett Green, Journal of Religion

  • Henry IV

    Henry IV (1399-1413), the son of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, seized the English throne at the age of thirty-two from his cousin Richard II and held it until his death, aged forty-five, when he was succeeded by his son, Henry V. This comprehensive and nuanced biography restores to his rightful place a king often overlooked in favor of his illustrious progeny.

    Henry faced the usual problems of usurpers: foreign wars, rebellions, and plots, as well as the ambitions and demands of the Lancastrian retainers who had helped him win the throne. By 1406 his rule was broadly established, and although he became ill shortly after this and never fully recovered, he retained ultimate power until his death. Using a wide variety of previously untapped archival materials, Chris Given-Wilson reveals a cultured, extravagant, and skeptical monarch who crushed opposition ruthlessly but never quite succeeded in satisfying the expectations of his own supporters.

  • Empress: Queen Victoria and India

    An entirely original account of Victoria's relationship with the Raj, this book argues that the Queen was humanely, intelligently, and passionately involved with India throughout her reign and that Victoria's influence as empress contributed significantly to the country's modernization, both political and economic.

  • The Language of Objects in the Art of the Americas

    In this wide-ranging book, a distinguished scholar of Latin American art explores the meanings of created and depicted objects from the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking regions of the New World. Edward J. Sullivan begins with objects exchanged during encounters between indigenous peoples of the Americas and newly-arrived Europeans, and he pursues the discussion to the present day, as artists engage in breaking down constructed concepts of "Latin American-ness." Sullivan's scope is sweeping--the changing meanings of objects over five centuries--and he encourages deeper conversation about the complexities of today's culture of the Americas.
    From American-made handicrafts displayed in Old World curiosity cabinets, to still life paintings projecting a Latin American nation's proud self-image, to 20th-century "found objects" identified as works of art, objects from the Americas provide a wealth of cultural insights. This generously illustrated volume invites the reader to travel across time and national boundaries to examine an array of these extraordinary and meaningful objects.

  • Dress in the Middle Ages

    This absorbing survey of medieval clothing makes an important and unique contribution to our understanding of the cultural and social conditions of western Europe in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Drawing on paintings and sculpture, documents and literature, surviving clothing, textiles, jewelry, and armor, Francoise Piponnier and Perrine Mane show that garments and accessories of the middle ages reveal much about life and society of the time.

    The authors examine the sources for clothing: what clothes were made of, why, and from where the materials came. They provide a chronology of changes in western European dress during the period, investigating the development and spread of "fashion." They explore the differences between the clothing of men and women, explaining that changes in fashion for women were less spectacular than those for men because of the secondary position of women in medieval society. The authors also discuss the changing significance of clothing to people as they progressed through life, how clothing related to status, the varied work attire of such professionals as lawyers, academics, and members of religious orders, and the clothing of carnival and disguise.

    Elegantly written and attractively presented, the book will be of interest not only to students of medieval history but also to anyone fascinated by clothes and fashion.

  • Kinship by Covenant - A Canonical Approach to the Fulfilment of God′s Saving Promises

    While the canonical scriptures were produced over many centuries and represent a diverse library of texts, they are unified by stories of divine covenants and their implications for God's people. In this deeply researched and thoughtful book, Scott Hahn shows how covenant, as an overarching theme, makes possible a coherent reading of the diverse traditions found within the canonical scriptures. Biblical covenants, though varied in form and content, all serve the purpose of extending sacred bonds of kinship, Hahn explains. Specifically, divine covenants form and shape a father-son bond between God and the chosen people. Biblical narratives turn on that fact, and biblical theology depends upon it. With meticulous attention to detail, the author demonstrates how divine son ship represents a covenant relationship with God that has been consistent throughout salvation history. A canonical reading of this divine plan reveals an illuminating pattern of promise and fulfillment in both the Old and New Testaments. God's saving mercies are based upon his sworn commitments, which he keeps even when his people break the covenant.

  • The Mourners: Tomb Sculpture from the Court of Burgundy

    During the late Middle Ages, the dukes of Burgundy - the wealthiest and most powerful aristocrats in northern Europe - commissioned sculptors of great renown to decorate their magnificent court in Dijon. Working in a studio presided over by Claus Sluter, these sculptors created monuments for the ducal family that rivalled contemporary Italian works. This stunning book provides an in-depth study of the twin summits of the achievement of these artists - sculptures from the tombs of Philip the Bold (1342-1404) and his son, John the Fearless (1371-1419). These extraordinary marble and alabaster tombs serve as platforms for the ducal figures, who rest atop fully carved arcades. Within the spaces of the arcades, the artists carved individual monks in procession. Just over two feet high, each monk is a miniature embodiment of late medieval devotion. Shown in various states of mourning, they move in perpetual procession beneath the marble bodies of their rulers. Accompanying the first major traveling exhibition of these recently restored sculptures, 'The Mourners' illuminates the artistic sophistication and craftsmanship of these works.

  • Hellfire Nation - The Politics of Sin in American History

    This insightful new conceptualization of American political history demonstrates that--despite the clear separation of church and state--religion lies at the heart of American politics. From the Puritan founding to the present day, the American story is a moral epic, James Morone says, and while moral fervor has inspired the dream of social justice it has also ignited our fiercest social conflicts.

    From the colonial era to the present day, Americans embraced a Providential mission, tangled with devils, and aspired to save the world. Moral fervor ignited our fiercest social conflicts--but it also moved dreamers to remake the nation in the name of social justice. Moral crusades inspired abolition, woman suffrage, and civil rights, even as they led Americans to hang witches, enslave Africans, and ban liquor. Today these moral arguments continue, influencing the debate over everything from abortion to foreign policy.

    Written with passion and deep insight, Hellfire Nation tells the story of a brawling, raucous, religious people. Morone shows how fears of sin and dreams of virtue defined the shape of the nation.

  • Faisal I of Iraq

    Born in 1883, King Faisal I of Iraq was a great figure not only in the founding of the state of Iraq but also in the making of the modern Middle East. In all the tumult leading to the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire and the establishment of new Arab states, Faisal was a central player. His life traversed each of the important political, military and intellectual developments of his times. This major life is the first to provide a fully rounded picture of Faisal the man and Faisal the monarch. Ali A. Allawi recounts the dramatic events of Faisal's life and provides a reassessment of his crucial role in developments in the pre- and post-World War I Middle East and of his lasting but underappreciated influence in the region even 80 years after his death. A battle-hardened military leader who, with the help of Lawrence of Arabia, organized the Arab Revolt against the Ottoman Empire; a leading representative of the Arab cause, alongside Gertrude Bell, at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919; a founding father and king of the first independent state of Syria; the first king of Iraq - in his many roles Faisal overcame innumerable crises and opposing currents while striving to build the structures of a modern state. This book is the first to afford his contributions to Middle East history the attention they deserve.

  • The Way and the Word - Science and Medicine in Early China and Greece

    The rich civilizations of ancient China and Greece built sciences of comparable sophistication--each based on different foundations of concept, method, and organization. In this engrossing book, two world-renowned scholars compare the cosmology, science, and medicine of China and Greece between 400 B.C. and A.D. 200, casting new light not only on the two civilizations but also on the evolving character of science.

    Sir Geoffrey Lloyd and Nathan Sivin investigate the differences between the thinkers in the two civilizations: what motivated them, how they understood the cosmos and the human body, how they were educated, how they made a living, and whom they argued with and why. The authors' new method integrally compares social, political, and intellectual patterns and connections, demonstrating how all affected and were affected by ideas about cosmology and the physical world. They relate conceptual differences in China and Greece to the diverse ways that intellectuals in the two civilizations earned their living, interacted with fellow inquirers, and were involved with structures of authority.

    By A.D. 200 the distinctive scientific strengths of both China and Greece showed equal potential for theory and practice. Lloyd and Sivin argue that modern science evolved not out of the Greek tradition alone but from the strengths of China, Greece, India, Islam, and other civilizations, which converged first in the Muslim world and then in Renaissance Europe.

  • Friends Hold All Things in Common - Tradition, Intellectual Property & the Adages of Erasmus

    Erasmus' Adages--a vast collection of the proverbial wisdom of Greek and Roman antiquity--was published in 1508 and became one of the most influential works of the Renaissance. It also marked a turning point in the history of Western thinking about literary property. At once a singularly successful commercial product of the new printing industry and a repository of intellectual wealth, the Adages looks ahead to the development of copyright and back to an ancient philosophical tradition that ideas should be universally shared in the spirit of friendship.

    In this elegant and tightly argued book, Kathy Eden focuses on both the commitment to friendship and common property that Erasmus shares with his favorite philosophers--Pythagoras, Plato, and Christ--and the early history of private property that gradually transforms European attitudes concerning the right to copy. In the process she accounts for the peculiar shape of Erasmus' collection of more than 3,000 proverbs and provides insightful readings of such ancient philosophical and religious thinkers as Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Iamblichus, Tertullian, Basil, Jerome, and Augustine.

  • Reconstructing The Renaissance - "Saint James Freeing Hermogenes" by Fra Angelico

    Saint James Freeing Hermogenes, an important painting by one of the world's most beloved Renaissance artists, was privately owned and rarely seen until two decades ago, when it was acquired by the Kimbell Art Museum. Now an eminent authority reviews previous studies on this beautiful Fra Angelico painting and draws on new technical and archival research to provide a more precise reconstruction of its original format and context.

    In analyzing this painting, Laurence Kanter reexamines and confirms Fra Angelico's status as a pioneer of the new representational style championed in Florence in the early fifteenth century by Brunelleschi, Masaccio, and Donatello, and he shows why he was one of the great artistic minds of his age. Kanter presents both detailed information for students and an introduction for the general reader to the methods and procedures of reconstructing and interpreting history when little contemporary written testimony survives.

  • Configuring the Networked Self - Law, Code and the Pay of Everyday Practice

    The legal and technical rules governing flows of information are out of balance, argues Julie E. Cohen in this original analysis of information law and policy. Flows of cultural and technical information are overly restricted, while flows of personal information often are not restricted at all. The author investigates the institutional forces shaping the emerging information society and the contradictions between those forces and the ways that people use information and information technologies in their everyday lives. She then proposes legal principles to ensure that people have ample room for cultural and material participation as well as greater control over the boundary conditions that govern flows of information to, from, and about them.

  • Fragile Diplomacy - Meissen Porcelain for European Courts, 1710-1763

    While imported Chinese porcelain had become a valuable commodity in Europe in the seventeenth century, local attempts to produce porcelain long remained unsuccessful. At last the secret of hard-paste porcelain was uncovered, and in 1710 the first European porcelain was manufactured in Saxony. Meissen porcelain, still manufactured today, soon ranked in value with silver and gold.

    This thorough and lavishly illustrated volume explores the early years of Meissen porcelain and how the princes of Saxony came to use highly prized porcelain pieces as diplomatic gifts for presentation to foreign courts. An eminent team of international contributors examines the trade of Meissen with other nations, from England to Russia. They also investigate the cultural ambience of the Dresden Court, varying tastes of the markets, the wide range of porcelain objects, and their designers and makers. Individual chapters are devoted to gifts to Denmark, other German courts, the Holy Roman Empire, Italy, France, and other nations. For every Meissen collector or enthusiast, this book will be not only a treasured handbook but also a source of visual delight.

  • Manchester

    This guide examines the full range and variety of Manchester's buildings old and new, from the medieval buildings of the cathedral and Cheetham's School to the architecture of the city's Victorian heyday, for example. Also included is Trafford's Imperial War Museum in the North.

  • Last Rites

    Twenty years ago, John Lukacs paused to set down the history of his own thoughts and beliefs in 'Confessions of an Original Sinner', an adroit blend of autobiography and personal philosophy. Now, in 'Last Rites', he continues and expands his reflections, this time integrating his conception of history and human knowledge with private memories of his wives and loves, and enhancing the book with footnotes from his idiosyncratic diaries. The resulting volume is fascinating and delightful, a book of history by a passionate, authentic, brilliant, and witty man. Lukacs begins with a concise rendering of a historical understanding of our world (essential reading for any historian), then follows with trenchant observations on his life in the United States, commentary on his native Hungary and the new meanings it took for him after 1989, and deeply personal portraits of his three wives, about whom he has not written before. He includes also a chapter on his formative memories of May and June 1940 and of Winston Churchill, a subject in some of Lukacs' later studies. 'Last Rites' is a richly layered summation combined with a set of extraordinary observations - an original book only John Lukacs could have written.

  • The Photographs of Edouard Baldus

    This is a study of landscape and architectural photographer, Edouard Baldus (1813-1889), a central figure in early French photography. His greatest achievements were his two railroad albums in which he addressed the influence of technology.

  • Order and Life

    This volume, which is based on the Terry Lectures delivered at Yale University in 1935, deals with the problem of the unity of natural knowledge. It considers the cleavage between the inorganic and biological sciences, and between the theology of intelligibility and that of inexplicability. Under the heading "The Nature of Biological Order" it considers some of the opinions which biologists, physicists, and philosophers hold regarding the form of organization which living things exhibit. The discussion is continued under the headings "The Deployment of Biological Order" and "The Hierarchical Continuity of Biological Order," and the conclusion is reached that "the profounder our insight into the nature of organic form, the clearer does the unity of science become." "It is an erudite volume, intended for the serious student of the philosophical aspects of biological science. To such it brings the product of a mature and discerning mind, well-versed in all the devious ramifications of a profoundly significant vein of thought." -Scientific Book Club Review

  • London 4 - North

    This volume on London architecture covers the boroughs of Barnet, Camden, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey and Islington. It gives a view of London's expansion northward from formal Georgian squares, to the hill towns of Hampstead and Highgate.

  • Jasper Johns - Gray

    Jasper Johns (b. 1930), one of today's most acclaimed and influential artists, is rarely considered in relation to monochromatic art. Yet single-colour experimentations have figured prominently in his productions since 1955, and within that significant subset of his work, the majority of monochromes are grey. In fact, every one of his iconic, serialized forms has been articulated in grey. This elegant book, spanning Johns' full career, examines this singular preoccupation, presenting a revolutionary new understanding of and appreciation for the artist as an accomplished tonalist.

  • The Pearl - A True Tale of Forbidden Love in Catherine the Great′s Russia

    Filled with a remarkable cast of characters and set against the backdrop of imperial Russia, this tale of forbidden romance could be the stuff of a great historical novel. But in fact 'The Pearl' tells a true tale, reconstructed in part from archival documents that have lain untouched for centuries. Douglas Smith presents the most complete and accurate account ever written of the illicit love between Count Nicholas Sheremetev (1751-1809), Russia's richest aristocrat, and Praskovia Kovalyova (1768-1803), his serf and the greatest opera diva of her time. Blessed with a beautiful voice, Praskovia began her training in Nicholas' operatic company as a young girl. Like all the members of Nicholas' troupe, Praskovia was one of his own serfs. But unlike the others, she utterly captured her master's heart. The book reconstructs Praskovia's stage career as 'The Pearl' and the heartbreaking details of her romance with Nicholas - years of torment before their secret marriage, the outrage of the artistocracy when news of the marriage emerged, Praskovia's death only days after delivering a son, and the unyielding despair that followed Nicholas to the end of his life. Written with grace and style, 'The Pearl' sheds light on the world of the Russian aristocracy, music history, and Russian attitudes toward serfdom. But above all, the book tells a haunting story of love against all odds.

  • Principles of Roman Architecture

    The architects of ancient Rome developed a vibrant and enduring tradition, inspiring those who followed in their profession even to the present day. This original book is the first to explore their approach to design. Mark Wilson Jones draws on both new archaeological discoveries and his own analyzes of the monuments to reveal how Roman architects went about the creative process.
    Wilson Jones begins by outlining the state of knowledge regarding Roman architects, Vitruvius in particular, as well as the dynamics of design as illuminated by surviving architectural drawings and models. Then, in a series of thematic chapters dedicated to the plan, the elevation, and the principal distributive element of Roman buildings, the Corinthian column, he focuses on underlying patterns of design that transcend function and typology. The success of Roman architecture is shown to rest on a robust yet subtle synthesis of theory, beauty, content, and practicality. At the same time, it maintains a vital equilibrium between the apparently conflicting goals of rule and variety. The next part of the book focuses on two singularly enigmatic monuments, Trajan's Column and the Pantheon, to illustrate how architects might bend principles to circumstance. The author resolves long-standing controversies over their conception, showing how both structures came to be modified after work on the site had begun. Even the Romans' mighty building machine had to come to terms with the gap between ideals and the physical realities of construction.

  • Bicycle - The History

    The first comprehensive history of the bicycle--lavishly illustrated with images spanning two centuries

    During the nineteenth century, the bicycle evoked an exciting new world in which even a poor person could travel afar and at will. But was the "mechanical horse" truly destined to usher in a new era of road travel or would it remain merely a plaything for dandies and schoolboys? In Bicycle: The History (named by Outside magazine as the #1 book on bicycles), David Herlihy recounts the saga of this far-reaching invention and the passions it aroused. The pioneer racer James Moore insisted the bicycle would become "as common as umbrellas." Mark Twain was more skeptical, enjoining his readers to "get a bicycle. You will not regret it--if you live."

    Because we live in an age of cross-country bicycle racing and high-tech mountain bikes, we may overlook the decades of development and ingenuity that transformed the basic concept of human-powered transportation into a marvel of engineering. This lively and engrossing history retraces the extraordinary story of the bicycle--a history of disputed patents, brilliant inventions, and missed opportunities. Herlihy shows us why the bicycle captured the public's imagination and the myriad ways in which it reshaped our world.

  • How Class Works - Power and Social Movement

    Although Americans like to believe that they live in a classless society, Stanley Aronowitz demonstrates that class remains a potent force. Defining class as the power of social groups to make a difference, he explains that social groups such as labor movements, environmental activists, and feminists become classes when they make demands that change the course of history. "With How Class Works Aronowitz puts the subject of social class squarely on the intellectual agenda-though in a new, inclusive, and dynamic form. Like his influential False Promises, How Class Works is both intellectually exciting and morally challenging."-Barbara Ehrenreich "In How Class Works Aronowitz argues for the enduring vitality of the concept of social class as a way of understanding social relations. This is a significant contribution to social theory, an argument certain to be widely considered, debated, and tested."-George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "An intellectually captivating book on a topic that remains as timely and significant as ever."-Howard Kimeldorf, University of Michigan

  • Miniature Rooms - The Thorne Rooms at the Art Institute

    The Thorne Rooms, sixty-eight miniature models of European interiors from the sixteenth century on and American furnishings from the seventeenth century on, have entranced generations of visitors to the Art Institute of Chicago. This charming book showcases these rooms, featuring full-colour views of each one as well as eight two-page spreads of some of the most spectacular interiors. The introductory essay by Bruce Hatton Boyer chronicles how Chicago socialite Mrs. James Ward Thorne conceived the rooms. They were made between 1934 and 1940 by a number of skilled craftsmen according to her exacting specifications. Many of the rooms were inspired by specific interiors in historic houses, palaces, and sites Mrs. Thorne visited during her travels, and Fannia Weingartner's individual commentaries provide information about each one. In addition, a number of Mrs. Thorne's original drawings are reproduced to actual scale.

  • Birds, Mammals, And Reptiles of the Galapagos Islands: An Identification Guide

    This is the first comprehensive guide to the unique wildlife of the Galapagos, encompassing the birds, mammals, and reptiles a visitor to these extraordinary islands might encounter. The innovative, simple-to-use format of the pocket-sized volume will help beginners and experts alike to identify with confidence the striking and charismatic Galapagos fauna.

    Highlighting the differences between similar species, the guide focuses on the key identification features of each. Information on the status, habitat preferences, breeding seasons, and significant behavioral characteristics is provided for each species, along with 78 distribution maps for all resident species. Fifty-three remarkable color plates compiled from a composite of 500 photographic images and 20 illustrations depict virtually every bird, mammal, and reptile ever recorded on the Galapagos.

  • Stuart Davis V 1, V 2 - Essays and Reference, Catalogue Entries 1-1323 - A Catalogue Raisonne 3V Set

    The highly anticipated, definitive reference on Stuart Davis's paintings, watercolors, drawings, and published illustrations

    Stuart Davis (1892-1964) made a mark on the art world early in his career, first with his Ashcan works and then with his highly personal version of Cubism, which firmly established American modernism as a force that could rival its European counterpart. Over the course of six decades, Davis produced artworks that drew inspiration from the European modernists but were deeply rooted in the popular culture of the United States. Jazz music and hipster talk, vaudeville stages, city streetscapes, New England fishing villages, gasoline stations, store fronts, and commercial packaging and advertising images were among the sources that infused his art with energy, bringing crisp edges, radiant color, and syncopated rhythms to a vast body of paintings, watercolors, and drawings.

    Documenting the life's work of this prolific and highly influential artist--who affected almost every development in American art from second-generation Ashcan realism around 1912 to color field and geometric painting in the 1960s--is a monumental achievement. In these three volumes, the editors have catalogued 1,749 artworks by the artist--including more than 600 works never previously illustrated--providing extensive documentation and information about each one. A detailed chronology of Davis's life, as well as an enlightening discussion of the compositional relationship between certain works spanning his oeuvre, rounds out this study. Exquisitely designed and produced, Stuart Davis: A Catalogue Raisonne will be the definitive reference on the artist's work for many years to come.

  • Eternal Ancestors - The Art of the Central African Reliquary

    Many masterpieces of central African sculpture were created to amplify the power of sacred relics that affirm a family's vital connection to its ancestral heritage. This important volume, focusing on some 130 works representing a diverse variety of regional genres, illuminates the purpose and significance of these icons of African art, which first came to prominence because of their appeal to the Western avant-garde. While providing an overview of sources ranging from colonial explorers, missionaries, critics, artists, and art historians, the book breaks new ground in its examination of the complex aesthetic and spiritual dimensions of the reliquaries. Its interdisciplinary approach brings together the perspectives of scholars in African and medieval art history along with those in African history, religion, and ethnography.

  • Gwynedd - The Buildings of Wales Series

    The spectacular landscapes of Gwynedd - the historic counties of Anglesey, Caernarfon and Merioneth - are the setting for many of Wales' greatest buildings. Beaumaris, Caernarfon, Conwy and Harlech castles are unsurpassed as works of medieval military architecture. Penrhyn is the epitome of romantic castle-making from the Regency age, while the bridges and viaducts constructed for Thomas Telford's new high road and Robert Stephenson's main-line railway are enduring wonders of nineteenth-century civil engineering. The Picturesque tradition makes a late and unexpected flowering at Portmeirion, the bewitching Italianate seaside village founded between the wars by the architect Clough Williams-Ellis. Prehistoric and Early Christian sites of immense evocative power are scattered through the mountainous interior, intermixed with a unique inheritance of early industrial monuments, including vast slate quarries and some celebrated narrow-gauge railways. The diverse towns include the planned Georgian settlement at Tremadoc and the ambitious seaside resort of Llandudno. Atmospheric medieval churches, prolific Nonconformist chapels and houses in distinctive vernacular traditions are plentiful throughout. Altogether, no area of Wales is more rewarding to the architectural traveler.

  • Duncan Phyfe - Master Cabinetmaker in New York

    Duncan Phyfe (1770-1854), known during his lifetime as the "United States Rage," to this day remains America's best-known cabinetmaker. Establishing his reputation as a purveyor of luxury by designing high-quality furniture for New York's moneyed elite, Phyfe would come to count among his clients some of the nation's wealthiest and most storied families.

    This richly illustrated volume covers the full chronological sweep of the craftsman's distinguished career, from his earliest furniture--which bears the influence of his 18th-century British predecessors Thomas Sheraton and Thomas Hope--to his late simplified designs in the Grecian Plain. More than sixty works by Phyfe and his workshop are highlighted, including rarely seen pieces from private collections and several newly discovered documented works. Additionally, essays by leading scholars bring to light new information on Phyfe's life, his workshop production, and his roster of illustrious patrons. What unfolds is the story of Phyfe's remarkable transformation from a young immigrant craftsman to an accomplished master cabinetmaker and an American icon.

  • Futurism - An Anthology

    In 1909, F.T. Marinetti published his incendiary 'Futurist Manifesto', proclaiming 'We stand on the last promontory of the centuries!!' and 'There, on the earth, the earliest dawn!'. Intent on delivering Italy from 'its fetid cancer of professors, archaeologists, tour guides, and antiquarians', the Futurists imagined an art, architecture, literature and music that would function like a machine, transforming the world rather than merely reflecting it. But within a decade, Futurism's utopian ambitions were being wedded to Fascist politics, an alliance that would tragically mar its reputation in the century to follow. Published to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the founding of Futurism, this is the most complete anthology of Futurist manifestos, poems, plays, and images ever to be published in English, spanning from 1909 to 1944. Now, amidst another era of unprecedented technological change and cultural crisis, is a pivotal moment to reevaluate Futurism and its haunting legacy for Western civilization.

  • Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age

    The flood of information brought to us by advancing technology is often accompanied by a distressing sense of information overload, yet this experience is not unique to modern times. In fact, says Ann Blair in this intriguing book, the invention of the printing press and the ensuing abundance of books provoked sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European scholars to register complaints very similar to our own. The author examines methods of information management in ancient and medieval Europe as well as the Islamic world and China, then focuses particular attention on the organization, composition, and reception of Latin reference books in print in early modern Europe. She explores in detail the sophisticated and sometimes idiosyncratic techniques that scholars and readers developed in an era of new technology and exploding information.

  • Paul T. Frankl and Modern American Design

    A comprehensive view of the life, work, and ideas of one of the creative giants of modern American design

    Arriving in the United States in 1914, Viennese-born Paul T. Frankl (1886-1958) brought with him an outsider's fresh perspective and an enthusiasm for forging a uniquely American design aesthetic. In the years between the two world wars he, more than any other designer, helped shape the distinctive look of American modernism. This authoritative book draws on an extensive collection of unpublished documents and family papers and photographs to provide the first full account of Frankl's life and ideas. The book also explores the history of modern American design and the extent of Frankl's influence on its trajectory. In the early 1920s, Frankl opened a New York City shop that became an epicenter of American modernism. Over the next decades, his work encompassed everything from individual pieces of furniture and decorative accessories to entire interiors, and his style continuously evolved, from early "Skyscraper" furniture to relaxed and casual designs favored by the Hollywood elite in the 1930s to manufactured pieces for the mass market in the 1950s. The book charts the impact of Frankl's ideas on merchants and consumers, on his fellow designers, and on the changing look of American homes and workplaces. With close to 170 illustrations, Paul T. Frankl and Modern American Design is an essential reference on 20th-century design.

  • Chinese Silks

    The first comprehensive history of China's most luxurious textile and its enduring influence on Chinese civilization and art

    Over the past fifty years, archaeological explorations in China have unearthed a wealth of textile materials, some dating as far back as five thousand years. In this magnificently researched and illustrated book, preeminent Western and Chinese scholars draw upon these spectacular discoveries to provide the most thorough account of the history of silk ever written.

    Encyclopedic in breadth, the volume presents a chronological history of silk from a variety of perspectives, including archaeological, technological, art historical, and aesthetic. The contributors explore the range of uses for silk, from the everyday to the sublime. By directly connecting recently found textile artifacts to specific references in China's vast historical literature, they illuminate the evolution of silk making and the driving social forces that have inspired the creation of innovative textiles through the millennia.

  • In Giacometti′s Studio

    This deeply engaging book introduces the reader to the creative chaos of the tiny Parisian studio of the great sculptor Alberto Giacometti, from the moment he and his brother, Diego, arrived in 1927, with all their possessions in a wheelbarrow, until Albertos death in 1966. Michael Peppiatt relates how the artist first worked there as a member of the Surrealist movement and then how he gradually made his mark on Pariss artistic, literary, and intellectual worlds. After an enforced wartime exile in Geneva in a miserable hotel, he returned to Paris and to the same broken-down little shed of a studio behind Montparnasse where he struggled to realize his pared-down vision of mankind and which became a magnet for many of the great artists and writers of the time (from Picasso and Braque to Balthus, from Breton and Genet to Beckett). Peppiatt prefaces his story with a poignant, personal narrative of how as a young man he arrived in Paris with an introduction from Francis Bacon to Giacometti; the encounter was forestalled by the artists very recent death, but Peppiatt instead got to know the key people in Giacomettis world. He explains how the studio, now dismantled, seems to be both Giacomettis most important artwork, encompassing countless complete or unfinished works, and the archive of years of struggle. With Giacomettis death, it became his greatest achievement, containing as it did the traces of a lifetimes search for truth. This vivid exploration of one of the most evocative and influential spaces in 20th-century art connects us with both a unique career and an entire, outstanding moment in French culture.

  • Duccio and the Origins of Western Painting

    In 2004 the Metropolitan Museum acquired an extremely rare and beautiful 'Madonna and Child' by the great painter Duccio di Buoninsegna. Duccio, who died in 1318, has long been recognized as the father of Sienese painting, and he fostered a new generation of talented and innovative painters. In art history textbooks, however, his considerable contribution to European painting is often overshadowed by the work of his contemporary Giotto. Christiansen examines the fascinating connection between Giotto and Duccio, which he likens to Michelangelo's relationship with Raphael, or Picasso's with Matisse, and explains the particular qualities that make Duccio such an essential artist.

  • Reading Matters - Five Centuries of Discovering Books

    It is easy to forget in our own day of cheap paperbacks and mega-bookstores that until very recently books were luxury items. Those who could not afford to buy had to borrow, share, obtain secondhand, inherit, or listen to others reading. This book examines how people acquired and read books from the sixteenth century to the present, focusing on the personal relationships between readers and the volumes they owned. Margaret Willes considers a selection of private and public libraries across the period - most of which have survived - showing the diversity of book owners and borrowers, from country-house aristocrats to modest farmers, from Regency ladies of leisure to working men and women.Exploring the collections of avid readers such as Samuel Pepys, Thomas Jefferson, Sir John Soane, Thomas Bewick, and Denis and Edna Healey, Margaret Willes also investigates the means by which books were sold, lending fascinating insights into the ways booksellers and publishers marketed their wares. For those who are interested in books and reading, and especially those who treasure books, this one will inform, entertain, and inspire.

  • The Spirit of Early Christian Thought - Seeking the Face of God

    In this eloquent introduction to early Christian thought, eminent religious historian Robert Louis Wilken examines the tradition that such figures as St. Augustine, Gregory of Nyssa, and others set in place. These early thinkers constructed a new intellectual and spiritual world, Wilken shows, and they can still be heard as living voices in the modern world.In chapters on topics including early Christian worship, Christian poetry and the spiritual life, the Trinity, Christ, the Bible, and icons, Wilken shows that the energy and vitality of early Christianity arose from within the life of the Church. While early Christian thinkers drew on the philosophical and rhetorical traditions of the ancient world, it was the versatile vocabulary of the Bible that loosened their tongues and minds and allowed them to construct the world anew, intellectually and spiritually. These thinkers were not seeking to invent a world of ideas, Wilken shows, but rather to win the hearts of men and women and to change their lives.
    Early Christian thinkers set in place a foundation that has endured. Their writings are an irreplaceable inheritance, and Wilken shows that they can still be heard as living voices within contemporary culture.

  • JM Barrie & the Lost Boys

    J. M. Barrie, Victorian novelist, playwright, and author of Peter Pan or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up, led a life almost as magical and interesting as as his famous creation. Childless in his marriage, Barrie grew close to the five young boys of the Llewelyn Davies family, ultimately becoming their guardian and devoted surrogate father when they were orphaned. Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and hours of recorded interviews with the family and their circle, to describe Barrie's life and the wonderful world he created for the boys.

    Originally published in 1979, this enchanting and richly illustrated account is reissued with a new preface to mark the release of Neverland, the film of Barrie's life, and the upcoming centenary of Peter Pan.

    "A psychological thriller . . . one of the year's most complex and absorbing biographies."--Gerald Clarke, Time

    "A terrible and fascinating story."--Eve Auchincloss, Washington Post

  • Treacherous Alliance - The Secret Dealings of Isreal, Iran and the United States

    The first book to untangle the complex and often duplicitous relations among Israel, Iran, and the United States

    In this era of superheated rhetoric and vitriolic exchanges between the leaders of Iran and Israel, the threat of nuclear violence looms. But the real roots of the enmity between the two nations mystify Washington policymakers, and no promising pathways to peace have emerged. This book traces the shifting relations among Israel, Iran, and the United States from 1948 to the present, uncovering for the first time the details of secret alliances, treacherous acts, and unsavory political maneuverings that have undermined Middle Eastern stability and disrupted U.S. foreign policy initiatives in the region.

    Trita Parsi, a U.S. foreign policy expert with more than a decade of experience, is the only writer who has had access to senior American, Iranian, and Israeli decision makers. He dissects the complicated triangular relations of their countries, arguing that America's hope for stability in Iraq and for peace in Israel is futile without a correct understanding of the Israeli-Iranian rivalry. Parsi's behind-the-scenes revelations about Middle East events will surprise even the most knowledgeable readers: Iran's prime minister asks Israel to assassinate Khomeini, Israel reaches out to Saddam Hussein after the Gulf War, the United States foils Iran's plan to withdraw support from Hamas and Hezbollah, and more. This book not only revises our understanding of the Middle East's recent past, it also spells out a course for the future. In today's belligerent world, few topics, if any, could be more important.

  • Jabotinsky - Zionism′s Samson

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, an insightful new biography of the most controversial and perhaps most fervent of all Zionist political figures
    Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880-1940) was a man of huge paradoxes and contradictions and has been the most misunderstood of all Zionist politicians--a first-rate novelist, a celebrated Russian journalist, and the founder of the branch of Zionism now headed by Benjamin Netanyahu. This biography, the first in English in nearly two decades, undertakes to answer central questions about Jabotinsky as a writer, a political thinker, and a leader. Hillel Halkin sets aside the stereotypes to which Jabotinsky has been reduced by his would-be followers and detractors alike.

    Halkin explains the importance of Odessa, Jabotinsky's native city, in molding his character and outlook; discusses his novels and short stories, showing the sometimes hidden connections between them and Jabotinsky's political thought, and studies a political career that ended in tragic failure. Halkin also addresses Jabotinsky's position, unique among the great figures of Zionist history, as both a territorial maximalist and a principled believer in democracy. The author inquires why Jabotinsky was often accused of fascist tendencies though he abhorred authoritarian and totalitarian politics, and investigates the many opposed aspects of his personality and conduct while asking whether or not they had an ultimate coherence. Few figures in twentieth-century Jewish life were quite so admired and loathed, and Halkin's splendid, subtle book explores him with empathy and lucidity.
    About Jewish Lives

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent" -New York Times

    "Exemplary" -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished" -New Yorker

    "Superb" -The Guardian

  • The Bagel - The Surprising History of a Modest Bread

    If smoked salmon and cream cheese bring only one thing to mind, you can count yourself among the world's millions of bagel mavens. But few people are aware of the bagel's provenance, let alone its adventuresome history. This charming book tells the remarkable story of the bagel's journey from the tables of seventeenth-century Poland to the freezers of middle America today, a story of often surprising connections between a cheap market-day snack and centuries of Polish, Jewish, and American history. Research in international archives and numerous personal interviews uncover the bagel's links with the defeat of the Turks by Polish King Jan Sobieski in 1683, the Yiddish cultural revival of the late nineteenth century, and Jewish migration across the Atlantic to America. There the story moves from the bakeries of New York's Lower East Side to the Bagel Bakers' Local 388 Union of the 1960s, and the attentions of the mob. For all its modest size, the bagel has managed to bridge cultural gaps, rescue kings from obscurity, charge the emotions, and challenge received wisdom. Maria Balinska weaves together a rich, quirky, and evocative history of East European Jewry and the unassuming ring-shaped roll the world has taken to its heart.

  • The Art of French Piano Music - Debussy, Ravel, Faure, Chabrier

    An essential resource for scholars and performers, this study by a world-renowned specialist illuminates the piano music of four major French composers, in comparative and reciprocal context. Howat explores the musical language and artistic ethos of this repertoire, juxtaposing structural analysis with editorial and performing issues. He also relates his four composers historically and stylistically to such predecessors as Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, the French harpsichord school and Russian and Spanish music. Challenging long-held assumptions about performance practice, Howat elucidates the rhythmic vitality and invention inherent in French music. In granting Faure and Chabrier equal consideration with Debussy and Ravel, he redresses a historic imbalance and reshapes our perceptions of this entire musical tradition. Outstanding historical documentation and analysis are supported by Howat's direct references to performing traditions shaped by the composers themselves. The book balances accessibility with scholarly and analytic rigour, combining a lifetime's scholarship with practical experience of teaching and the concert platform.

  • Cezanne Watercolours - Between Drawing and Painting

    C'zanne's watercolors exhibit not only kaleidoscopic arrays of translucent color but also very light graphite pencil lines that contrast strikingly with the soft watery touches of color. These drawn lines have been largely overlooked in previous studies of C'zanne's watercolors.

    In this ravishing book, Matthew Simms argues that it was the dialogue between drawing and painting--the movement between the pencil and the paintbrush--that attracted C'zanne to watercolor. Watercolor allowed C'zanne to express what he termed his "sensations" in two distinct modes that become a record of his shifting and spontaneous responses to his subject. Combining close visual analysis and examination of historical context, Simms focuses on the counterpoint of drawing and color in C'zanne's watercolors over the course of his career and as viewed in relation to his oil paintings. More than a tool for sketching or preparing for oil paintings, Simms contends, watercolor was a unique means of expression in its own right that allowed C'zanne to combine in one place the two otherwise opposed mediums of drawing and painting.

  • Lawrence Weiner As Far As the Eye Can See

    A comprehensive look at the remarkable 40-year career of a defining figure associated with conceptual art

    Lawrence Weiner (b. 1942) is one of the primary figures associated with the emergence of conceptual art in the 1960s. For over four decades, Weiner has defined art as a representation of relationships in the physical world--"the relationship of human beings to objects and objects to objects in relation to human beings." This highly anticipated publication represents the full range of Weiner's practice, from the early 1960s to the present, from his early paintings to his work in language, including works on paper, films, videos, books, and public commissions. Weiner adopted language as his primary material in 1968. According to his landmark STATEMENT OF INTENT, an oft-quoted declaration first published in 1969, each work can be constructed by the artist, fabricated by someone else, or need not be built at all and simply presented in language. Weiner's work is often manifested outside the gallery context--through postcards, billboards, lectures, or even on a series of cast-iron manhole covers for the city of New York.This substantial publication, produced in conjunction with the artist's first major retrospective in the United States and in close collaboration with the artist, constitutes Weiner's largest monograph to date and brings together five esteemed scholars along with Turner Prize finalist Liam Gillick to examine the artist's impact on the art world today.

  • Photographs of Homer Page - The Gruggenheim Year - New York 1949-1950

    This book - the first on this brilliant but little-known documentary photographer - focuses on Homer Page's New York photographs taken while he was a Guggenheim Fellow during the late 1940s.

  • Design and Plan in the Country House - From Castle Donjons to Palladian Boxes

    The way a man thinks about his day-to-day living and the needs of his household reveals a great deal about his ambitions, his idea of himself, and his role in the community. And his house or castle offers many clues to his habits as well as those of the members of his household. This intriguing book explores the evolution of country house plans throughout Britain and Ireland, from medieval times to the eighteenth century. With photographs and detailed architectural plans of each house under discussion, the book presents a whole range of new insights into how these homes were designed and what their varied designs tell us about the lives of their residents.

    Starting with fortified medieval tower houses, the book traces patterns that developed and sometimes repeated in country house design over the centuries. It discusses who slept in the bedchambers, where food was prepared, how rooms were arranged for official and private activities, what towers signified, and more. Groundbreaking in its depth, the volume offers a rare tour of country houses for scholar and general reader alike.

  • The Disappearance of Objects - New York Art and the Rise of the Postmodern City

    In the years around 1960, a rapid process of deindustrialization profoundly changed New York City. At the same time, massive highway construction, urban housing renewal, and the growth of the financial sector altered the city's landscape. As the new economy took shape, manufacturing lofts, piers, and small shops were replaced by sleek high-rise housing blocks and office towers. Focusing on works by Claes Oldenburg, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Donald Judd, art historian Joshua Shannon shows how New York art engaged with this transformation of the city. Shannon convincingly argues that these four artists, all living amid the changes, filled their art with old street signs, outmoded flashlights, and other discarded objects in a richly revealing effort to understand the economic and architectural transformation of their city.

  • Light Years - Conceptual Art and the Photograph, 1964-1977

    Photography played a critical role in conceptual art of the 1960s and 1970s, as artists turned to photography as both medium and subject matter. 'Light Years' offers the first major survey of the key artists of this period who used photography to new and inventive ends. Whereas some employed photographic images to create slide projections, photographic canvases and artists' books, others integrated them into sculptural assemblages and multimedia installations. This book highlights the work of acclaimed international artists such as Vito Acconci, John Baldessari, Mel Bochner, Sol LeWitt, Bruce Nauman, Giuseppe Penone and Ed Ruscha. Matthew Witkovsky's essay provides the larger context for photography within conceptual art, a theme that is further elaborated in texts by Mark Godfrey, Anne Rorimer and Joshua Shannon. An essay by Robin Kelsey focuses on the pioneering work of John Baldessari in which he explored the element of chance, and an essay by Giuliano Sergio illuminates the lesser-known work of Arte Povera, an Italian movement that sought to dismantle established conventions in both the making and presentation of art.

  • I Corinthians - Anchor Bible Commentaries

    In this volume, New Testament scholar Joseph A. Fitzmyer provides a fresh translation of the Pauline epistle along with extensive commentary and notes, a complete outline, a bibliography for further research, and useful indexes.

  • Asian Art at the Norton Simon Museum - Art from Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia V 3

    This gorgeously illustrated book completes a three-volume series cataloguing the Asian art collection at the Norton Simon Museum. The volume includes approximately 180 religious artworks from Sri Lanka, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Burma and Laos, as well as Ban Chiang pottery and rain drums. Stone and metal sculptures from Cambodia and Thailand are an area of particular strength in this collection.

    A substantial introduction to the volume provides pertinent information about the cultural milieu that inspired the creation of these artworks. Each object is then illustrated and discussed in detail in the catalogue section of the book.

  • Pembrokeshire - Pevsner Buildings of Wales Series

    This authoritative guide to the southwest corner of Wales by three local experts encompasses a wide sweep of history, from the rugged prehistoric remains that stud the distinctive windswept landscape overlooking the Atlantic to distinguished recent buildings that respond imaginatively to their natural setting. The comprehensive gazetteer encompasses the great cathedral of St David's and its Bishop's Palace, the numerous churches, and the magnificent Norman castles that reflect the turbulent medieval past. It gives attention also to the lesser-known delights of Welsh chapels--both simple rural and sophisticated Victorian examples--in all their wayward variety and provides detailed accounts of a rewarding range of towns, including the county town, Haverfordwest, the attractively unspoilt Regency resort of Tenby, and Milford Haven and Pembroke Dock, with their important naval history. An introduction with valuable specialist contributions sets the buildings in context.

  • Diasporas of the Mind - Jewish and Postcolonial Writing and the Nightmare of History

    In this fascinating and erudite book, Bryan Cheyette throws new light on a wide range of modern and contemporary writers--some at the heart of the canon, others more marginal--to explore the power and limitations of the diasporic imagination after the Second World War. Moving from early responses to the death camps and decolonization, through internationally prominent literature after the Second World War, the book culminates in fresh engagements with contemporary Jewish, post-ethnic, and postcolonial writers. Cheyette regards many of the twentieth- and twenty-first-century luminaries he examines--among them Hannah Arendt, Anita Desai, Frantz Fanon, Albert Memmi, Primo Levi, Caryl Phillips, Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Muriel Spark--as critical exemplars of the diasporic imagination. Against the discrete disciplinary thinking of the academy, he elaborates and argues for a new comparative approach across Jewish and postcolonial histories and literatures. And in so doing, Cheyette illuminates the ways in which histories and cultures can be imagined across national and communal boundaries.

  • Conversation - A History of a Declining Art

    The story of the rise and fall of the art of conversation in Western civilization

    Essayist Stephen Miller pursues a lifelong interest in conversation by taking an historical and philosophical view of the subject. He chronicles the art of conversation in Western civilization from its beginnings in ancient Greece to its apex in eighteenth-century Britain to its current endangered state in America. As Harry G. Frankfurt brought wide attention to the art of bullshit in his recent bestselling On Bullshit, so Miller now brings the art of conversation into the light, revealing why good conversation matters and why it is in decline. Miller explores the conversation about conversation among such great writers as Cicero, Montaigne, Swift, Defoe, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Virginia Woolf. He focuses on the world of British coffeehouses and clubs in "The Age of Conversation" and examines how this era ended. Turning his attention to the United States, the author traces a prolonged decline in the theory and practice of conversation from Benjamin Franklin through Hemingway to Dick Cheney. He cites our technology (iPods, cell phones, and video games) and our insistence on unguarded forthrightness as well as our fear of being judgmental as powerful forces that are likely to diminish the art of conversation.

  • Proverbs 13-31 - Yale Anchor Bible Commentary Series

    This volume completes Bible scholar Michael V. Fox's comprehensive commentary on the book of 'Proverbs'. As in his previous volume on the early chapters of 'Proverbs', the author here translates and explains in accessible language the meaning and literary qualities of the sayings and poems that comprise the final chapters. He gives special attention to comparable sayings in other wisdom books, particularly from Egypt, and makes extensive use of medieval Hebrew commentaries, which have received scant attention in previous 'Proverb' commentaries. In separate sections set in smaller type, the author addresses technical issues of text and language for interested scholars. The author's essays at the end of the commentary view the book of 'Proverbs' in its entirety and investigate its ideas of wisdom, ethics, revelation, and knowledge. Out of 'Proverbs's' great variety of sayings from different times, Fox shows, there emerges a unified vision of life, its obligations, and its potentials.

  • Denver - A Photographic Survey of the Metropolitan Area 1973-1974

    'denver' and 'What We Bought', together with 'The New West', form a loose trilogy of Robert Adams' work exploring the rapidly developing landscape of the Denver metropolitan area from 1968 through 1974. In the former two books, Adams created a comprehensive document that was resolute in its avoidance of romantic notions of the American West and dispassionately honest about man's despoliation of the land. Both books demonstrate the artist at the height of his powers as a documentary photographer and a poetic sequencer of images. The photographs featured in 'denver' and 'What We Bought' show tract housing with mountain ranges in the distance, trailer lots devoid of people, suburban streets through generic windows, shopping mall interiors, and parking lots: subjects distinctly unspectacular, familiar, and banal. Adams' compositions are straightforward and democratic, and it is this precise turn from sentimentality that has made Adams one of the most influential figures in the history of American photography. These exquisite new editions, printed in rich tritones, celebrate this landmark work. 'denver' also includes new and previously unpublished photographs from the project, chosen and sequenced by Adams himself.

  • Two Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration

    Two of Locke's most mature and influential political writings and three brilliant interpretive essays combined in an outstanding new volume

    Among the most influential writings in the history of Western political thought, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration remainvital to political debates today, more than three centuries after they were written. The complete texts appear in this volume, accompanied by interpretive essays by three prominent Locke scholars. Ian Shapiro's introduction places Locke's political writings in historical and biographical context. John Dunn explores both the intellectual context in which Locke wrote the Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration andthe major interpretive controversies surrounding their meaning. Ruth Grant offers a comprehensive discussion of Locke's views on women and the family, and Shapiro contributes an essay on the democratic elements of Locke's political theory. Taken together, the texts and essays in this volume offer invaluable insights into the history of ideas and the enduring influence of Locke's political thought.

  • Why the Romantics Matter

    A renowned scholar's reflections on the romantic period, its disparate participants, and our unacknowledged debt to them

    With his usual wit and elan, esteemed historian Peter Gay enters the contentious, long-standing debates over the romantic period. Here, in this concise and inviting volume, he reformulates the definition of romanticism and provides a fresh account of the immense achievements of romantic writers and artists in all media.

    Gay's scope is wide, his insights sharp. He takes on the recurring questions about how to interpret romantic figures and their works. Who qualifies to be a romantic? What ties together romantic figures who practice in different countries, employ different media, even live in different centuries? How is modernism indebted to romanticism, if at all?

    Guiding readers through the history of the romantic movement across Britain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, Gay argues that the best way to conceptualize romanticism is to accept its complicated nature and acknowledge that there is no "single basket" to contain it. Gay conceives of romantics in "families," whose individual members share fundamental values but retain unique qualities. He concludes by demonstrating that romanticism extends well into the twentieth century, where its deep and lasting impact may be measured in the work of writers such as T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf.

  • Sebastiano Serlio on Architecture V 1

    Sebastiano Serlio introduced the principles of classical design to northern Europe and was the most important architectural writer and theorist of the sixteenth century. However, his writings have been inaccessible to English language readers until now. This distinguished translation of Serlio's treatise, complete with his beautiful woodcut illustrations, replaces the only other English version--an inaccurate translation from Dutch produced in 1611.

  • Conversaciones con Jesus Soto / Conversations With Jesus Soto

    Jesus Soto (1923-2005) was a Venezuelan painter and sculptor renowned for his kinetic artwork: from interactive metal and plastic sculptures to his dramatic architectural hangings. These fascinating interviews (presented in English and Spanish) were undertaken over the course of several years. They are published here for the first time, and offer us an unprecedented opportunity to understand his remarkable contributions to Latin American art. Also revealed is an essential account of the key moments of a long and fruitful life, from his simple childhood to his key role in the development of kineticism in Paris in the 1950s and 60s. Reproduced throughout are important representative works from the artist's career.

  • Minimalism - Art and Polemics in the Sixties

    What is minimalism? The answer to this simple question has defied simple answers. In this highly readable history of minimalist art James Meyer argues that "minimalism" was not a coherent movement but a field of overlapping and sometimes opposed practices. He traces in comprehensive detail the emergence of six figures associated with the development--Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, and Anne Truitt--and how the notion of minimalism came to be constructed around their art in the 1960s. Despite distinctive differences in method and points of view, Meyer shows, these artists became equated in a series of important exhibitions and texts that led to their designation as minimalists.

    Beginning with the first reviews of minimalist shows, the book tracks the development of an art that critics dubbed Cool Art, ABC Art, and Primary Structures before settling on the deprecating label "minimal art." Suggesting that such work was overly reduced in form and facture, this term implied that the new abstraction was barely legible as fine art to some viewers. Meyer describes the heated polemic that unfolded in response to these practices, the differing claims of the artists, and the sometimes intense rivalries that developed within a highly competitive, fashion-minded New York art scene. The book culminates with an analysis of minimalism's canonization in the late sixties, its reception in Europe, and its discrediting by leftist viewers who associated the new art with American capitalist-imperialism of the Vietnam War.

  • Art for Art′s Sake - Aestheticism in Victorian Painting

    In the London circles of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Frederic Leighton, the notion of "art for art's sake" became a shared concern: if art is not created for the sake of preaching a moral lesson, or supporting a political cause, or making a fortune, or any other objective, what might art be? Art historian Elizabeth Prettejohn traces the emergence of the debates over this issue in the 1860s and 1870s, focusing especially on the Rossetti, Whistler, Leighton, and other protagonists of the Aesthetic Movement and their paintings--some of the most haunting and memorable images in modern art. The English painters' search for the formula to best express the idea of "art for art's sake" was a unified and powerful artistic undertaking, Prettejohn demonstrates, and the Aesthetic Movement made important contributions to the history of modern art.

  • From Ellis Island to JFK - New Yorks Two Great Waves of Immigration

    In the history, the very personality, of New York City, few events loom larger than the wave of immigration at the turn of the last century. Today a similar influx of new immigrants is transforming the city again. Better than one in three New Yorkers is now an immigrant. From Ellis Island to JFK is the first in-depth study that compares these two huge social changes.

    A key contribution of this book is Nancy Foner's reassessment of the myths that have grown up around the earlier Jewish and Italian immigration--and that deeply color how today's Asian, Latin American, and Caribbean arrivals are seen. Topic by topic, she reveals the often surprising realities of both immigrations. For example:

    • Education: Most Jews, despite the myth, were not exceptional students at first, while many immigrant children today do remarkably well.
    • Jobs: Immigrants of both eras came with more skills than is popularly supposed. Some today come off the plane with advanced degrees and capital to start new businesses.
    • Neighborhoods: Ethnic enclaves are still with us but they're no longer always slums--today's new immigrants are reviving many neighborhoods and some are moving to middle-class suburbs.
    • Gender: For married women a century ago, immigration often, surprisingly, meant less opportunity to work outside the home. Today, it's just the opposite.
    • Race: We see Jews and Italians as whites today, but to turn-of-the-century scholars they were members of different, alien races. Immigrants today appear more racially diverse--but some (particularly Asians) may be changing the boundaries of current racial categories.
    Drawing on a wealth of historical and contemporary research and written in a lively and entertaining style, the book opens a new chapter in the study of immigration--and the story of the nation's gateway city.

  • For the Common Good - Principles of American Academic Freedom

    Debates about academic freedom have become increasingly fierce and frequent. Legislative efforts to regulate American professors proliferate across the nation. Although most American scholars desire to protect academic freedom, they have only a vague and uncertain apprehension of its basic principles and structure. This book offers a concise explanation of the history and meaning of American academic freedom and it attempts to intervene into contemporary debates by clarifying the fundamental functions and purposes of academic freedom in America. Matthew W. Finkin and Robert C. Post trace how the American conception of academic freedom was first systematically articulated in 1915 by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and how this conception was in subsequent years elaborated and applied by Committee A of the AAUP. The authors discuss the four primary dimensions of academic freedom: research and publication, teaching, intramural speech and extramural speech. They carefully distinguish academic freedom from the kind of individual free speech right that is created by the First Amendment. The authors strongly argue that academic freedom protects the capacity of faculty to pursue the scholar's profession according to the standards of that profession.

  • Andrew Lloyd Webber

    Andrew Lloyd Webber is the most famous - and most controversial - composer of musical theatre alive today. Hundreds of millions of people have seen his musicals, which include 'Cats', 'The Phantom of the Opera', 'Starlight Express', 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat', 'Jesus Christ Superstar', 'Evita', and 'Sunset Boulevard'. Even more know his songs. Lloyd Webber's many awards include seven Tonys and three Grammys, but he has nonetheless been the subject of greater critical vitriol than any of his artistic peers. Why have both the man and his work provoked such extreme responses? Does he challenge his audiences, or merely recycle the comfortable and familiar? Over three decades, how has Lloyd Webber changed fundamentally what a musical can be? In this sustained examination of Lloyd Webber's creative career, the music scholar John Snelson explores the vast range of influences that have informed Lloyd Webber's work, from film, rock and pop music to Lloyd Webber's own life story. This rigorous and sympathetic survey will be essential reading for anyone interested in Lloyd Webber's musicals and the world of modern musical theatre that he has been so instrumental in shaping. This work received a rating of 'Outstanding' from 2005 University Press Books Committee.

  • Das Nibelungenlied - Song of the Nibelungs

    A new verse translation of the great German epic poem that inspired Wagner's Ring Cycle and J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

    No poem in German literature is so well known and studied in Germany and Europe as the 800-year-old Das Nibelungenlied. In the English-speaking world, however, the poem has remained little known, languishing without an adequate translation. This wonderful new translation by eminent translator Burton Raffel brings the epic poem to life in English for the first time, rendering it in verse that does full justice to the original High Middle German. His translation underscores the formal aspects of the poem and preserves its haunting beauty. Often called the German lliad, Das Nibelungenlied is a heroic epic both national in character and sweeping in scope. The poem moves inexorably from romance through tragedy to holocaust. It portrays the existential struggles and downfall of an entire people, the Burgundians, in a military conflict with the Huns and their king. In his foreword to the book, Michael Dirda observes that the story "could be easily updated to describe the downfall of a Mafia crime family, something like The Godfather, with swords." The tremendous appeal of Das Nibelungenlied throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is reflected in such works as Richard Wagner's opera tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen, Fritz Lang's two-part film Die Nibelungen, and, more recently, J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.

  • The Artistic Furniture Of Charles Rohlfs

    A highly anticipated look at the life and work of one of turn-of-the-century America's most creative and influential furniture designers

    Charles Rohlfs (1853-1936) ranked among the most innovative furniture makers at the turn of the twentieth century. Praised by the international press and exhibited throughout the United States and Europe, his beautiful works grew out of an interesting mix of styles that included Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and proto-modernism. This book presents the first major study of this important American designer and craftsman, drawing upon new photographs and fresh sources of information.

    Alongside traditional historical approaches, the book presents detailed formal, structural, and stylistic analyses of Rohlfs's well-known masterpieces from major museums, together with lesser-known objects in public and private collections. Topics include discovering the contribution of Rohlfs's wife--mystery novelist Anna Katharine Green--to his designs; the far-ranging sources of his idiosyncratic motifs; his influence on Gustav Stickley's designs; his commissioned interiors; his efforts at self-promotion and marketing; and his attempts to define a conceptual framework for his artistic endeavor. Handsomely designed and illustrated, the book also features a complete set of unpublished period illustrations of over seventy works.

  • Irish Furniture

    This lavishly illustrated and comprehensive volume is the first devoted entirely to the subject of Irish furniture and woodwork. It provides a detailed survey--encompassing everything from medieval choir stalls to magnificent drawing-room suites for the great houses--from earliest times to the end of the eighteenth century.
    The first part of the book presents a chronological history, illustrated with superb examples of Irish furniture and interior carving. In a lively text, the Knight of Glin and James Peill consider a broad range of topics, including a discussion of the influence of Irish craftsmen in the colonies of America. The second part of the book is a fascinating pictorial catalogue of different types of surviving furniture, including chairs, stools, baroque sideboards, elegant tea and games tables, bookcases, and mirrors. The book also features an index of Irish furniture-makers and craftsmen of the eighteenth century, compiled from Dublin newspaper advertisements and other contemporary sources.

  • Kenya - Between Hope and Despair, 1963-2010

    On December 12, 1963, people across Kenya joyfully celebrated independence from British colonial rule, anticipating a bright future of prosperity and social justice. As the nation approaches the fiftieth anniversary of its independence, however, the people's dream remains elusive. During its first five decades Kenya has experienced assassinations, riots, coup attempts, ethnic violence, and political corruption. The ranks of the disaffected, the unemployed, and the poor have multiplied. In this authoritative and insightful account of Kenya's history from 1963 to the present day, Daniel Branch sheds new light on the nation's struggles and the complicated causes behind them.

    Branch describes how Kenya constructed itself as a state and how ethnicity has proved a powerful force in national politics from the start, as have disorder and violence. He explores such divisive political issues as the needs of the landless poor, international relations with Britain and with the Cold War superpowers, and the direction of economic development. Tracing an escalation of government corruption over time, the author brings his discussion to the present, paying particular attention to the rigged election of 2007, the subsequent compromise government, and Kenya's prospects as a still-evolving independent state.

  • The Kings and Their Hawks - Falconry in Medieval England

    In medieval Europe, falconry was perhaps the most popular form of hunting among the aristocracy. Owning a falcon, and the necessary falconer to go with it, was a status symbol throughout the middle ages. This book is the first broad history of English royal falconry in medieval times, a book that draws on forty years of research to provide a full description of the actual practice and conditions of the sport and of the role of falconers in the English royal household.

    Robin S. Oggins begins with a description of the birds of prey, their training, and the sport of falconry. He provides a short history of early falconry in western Europe and England, then explores in unprecedented detail royal falconry from the reign of William I to the death of Edward I in 1307. The author concludes with an overview of the place and importance of falconry in medieval life.

  • The Problem of Perversion - The View from Self Psychology

    "A work that goes well beyond dealing systematically with the theory and treatment of difficult-to-treat patients suffering from narcissistic behavior disorders. It is also a significant contribution to the fundamentals of self psychology by a creative, productive, and disciplined thinker."-Paul H. Ornstein, M.D. "In this exciting and uncommonly lucid volume, Goldberg presents his view from self psychology in a tone of open engagement with other leading analytic thinkers of past and present. As a result, the reader feels more a participant in an exciting debate than an observer in a dusty lecture hall. Those who have turned away from early self psychology will be rewarded by this incisive application of the best of self psychological thought used to enrich prior psychoanalytic understanding."-Warren S. Poland, M.D. "Clinicians puzzling over the mysterious set of behaviors termed in our field 'perversions' will be delighted and relieved to discover this newest book by Arnold Goldberg, M.D. In this volume, which is arguably the most innovative extension of Kohut's clinical theory published to date, Goldberg demonstrates that an understanding of the concept of a split, divided self can be expanded and deepened to facilitate a meliorative approach to these narcissistic behavior disorders, illustrating his thesis with clear examples from his practice. We predict that with the publication of this book, no one will be able to treat, or even to think about, perversions without accessing the author's powerful and persuasive formulations."-Morton Shane, M.D., and Estelle Shane, Ph.D., Co-Presidents, Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis

  • Warrior, Dancer, Seductress, Queen - Women in Judges and Biblical Israel

    Some of the Bible's most memorable characters are the women in the book of Judges. From Deborah and Jael to Delilah and Samson's mother, these women led the Israelites in battle, used their wits to defeat the enemy, their wiles to seduce mighty men, and their wisdom to prevail on God. In Warrior, Dancer, Seductress, Queen author Susan Ackerman offers a keen analysis of the main types of women found in Judges and examines other biblical books and ancient Near Eastern literature to demonstrate how these types recur elsewhere. Thorough yet entertaining, her study leaves readers with an understanding of what roles these women played in Israelite society and religion. The first female author to be published in the Anchor Bible Reference Library, Ackerman and her cutting-edge biblical scholarship will be a valuable addition to this venerable series.

  • Matthew Boulton - Selling What All the World Desires

    Matthew Boulton was an eighteenth-century designer, inventor and industrialist, a consummate businessman and co-founder of the influential Lunar Society. Now, on the bicentenary of his death, this book surveys his life and extraordinarily varied achievements. The book explains how Boulton, a Birmingham 'toy' maker producing buttons, buckles and silverware, went into business with James Watt and exported Boulton & Watt steam engines all over the world. Meanwhile his magnificent ormolu ornaments decorated aristocratic drawing rooms, and his determination to discourage counterfeiters led to a contract to manufacture British coinage and coins of other countries at his mint. Boulton was leader of the campaign to establish the Birmingham Assay Office (still the busiest in the country), and also at the heart of the Lunar Society, a group of prominent industrialists, natural philosophers, and intellectuals interested in scientific and social change. A friend of Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Erasmus Darwin, Josiah Wedgwood and many others, Boulton was a fascinating man, Britain's leading Enlightenment entrepreneur.

  • One World - The Ethics of Globalization

    One of the world's most influential philosophers here considers the ethical issues surrounding globalization. Peter Singer discusses climate change, the role of the World Trade Organization, human rights and humanitarian intervention, and foreign aid, showing how a global ethic rather than a nationalistic approach can provide illuminating answers to important problems.
    The book encompasses four main global issues: climate change, the role of the World Trade Organization, human rights and humanitarian intervention, and foreign aid. Singer addresses each vital issue from an ethical perspective and offers alternatives to the state-centric approach that characterizes international theory and relations today. Posing a bold challenge to narrow or nationalistic views, Singer presents a realistic, new way of looking at contemporary global issues--through a prism of ethics.

  • Why Architecture Matters

    'Why Architecture Matters' is not a work of architectural history or a guide to the styles or an architectural dictionary, though it contains elements of all three. The purpose of 'Why Architecture Matters' is to 'come to grips with how things feel to us when we stand before them, with how architecture affects us emotionally as well as intellectually' - with its impact on our lives. 'Architecture begins to matter', writes Paul Goldberger, 'when it brings delight and sadness and perplexity and awe along with a roof over our heads'. He shows us how that works in examples ranging from a small Cape Cod cottage to the 'vast, flowing' Prairie houses of Frank Lloyd Wright, from the Lincoln Memorial to the highly sculptural Guggenheim Bilbao and the Church of Sant'Ivo in Rome, where 'simple geometries...create a work of architecture that embraces the deepest complexities of human imagination'. Based on decades of looking at buildings and thinking about how we experience them, the distinguished critic raises our awareness of fundamental things like proportion, scale, space, texture, materials, shapes, light, and memory. Upon completing this remarkable architectural journey, readers will enjoy a wonderfully rewarding new way of seeing and experiencing every aspect of the built world.

  • Small Bronzes in the Renaissance - Studies in the History of Art V62

    This far-ranging book presents the most recent research on small-scale bronze production of the Renaissance. The contributors to the volume--an international group of curators, art historians, and conservators--analyze the production and collecting of small bronze sculptures from the fifteenth through the early seventeenth century in both Italy and the North. They offer new assessments and attributions of these fascinating works of art, the result of an intense collaboration between artists and collectors.

    The book sheds light on the origins of the "household" bronze in Florence around the middle of the fifteenth century and on the groundbreaking developments in North Italy that followed. It reexamines the contribution of Donatello and his immediate followers in the first stages of bronze production as well as proposing a number of new attributions. Among the book's other topics are casting procedures, including a proposal for a method used by Donatello; the spread of technological and artistic advances from Italy into the Northern countries; the work and workshop practices of sculptors of North Italy; and the assembling of personalized collections of small bronzes by German, English, and American connoisseurs from the eighteenth century to our own.

  • Tapestry in the Baroque - Threads of Splendour

    Conceived as a sequel to the critically acclaimed Tapestry in the Renaissance: Art and Magnificence (2002), this lavishly illustrated volume is the first comprehensive survey of 17th-century European tapestry available in English. From the Middle Ages until the late 18th century, European courts expended vast sums on tapestries, which were made with precious materials after designs by the leading artists of the day. Yet, this spectacular medium is still often presented as a decorative art of lesser importance. Tapestry in the Baroque challenges this notion, demonstrating that tapestry remained among the most prestigious figurative mediums throughout the 17th and early 18th centuries, prized by the rich for its artistry and as a propaganda tool.
    The book features forty-five of the finest surviving examples from collections in more than fifteen countries, as well as a number of related designs and oil sketches. Through these it examines the stylistic developments of tapestry between 1590 and 1720, when such masters as Peter Paul Rubens, Jacob Jordaens, Simon Vouet, Charles Le Brun, Pietro da Cortona, and Giovanni Romanelli responded to the challenges and opportunities of the medium in the context of contemporary artistic developments.

  • Web Style Guide - Basic Design Principles for Creating Web Sites 3e

    Consistently praised in earlier editions as the best volume on classic elements of web site design, Web Style Guide, now in its Third Edition, continues its tradition of emphasis on fundamentals. Focusing on the needs of web site designers in corporations, government, nonprofit organizations, and academic institutions, the book explains established design principles and how they apply in web design projects in which information design, interface design, and efficient search and navigation are of primary concern.

    New in this edition:

    --a full chapter devoted to Universal Usability

    --guidelines and techniques for creating universally usable designs

    --a full chapter on Information Architecture and how best to promote its robust development

    --information on Search Engine Optimization and the designs that improve it

    --techniques for using Cascading Style Sheets for layouts and typographic design

    --185 illustrations, all in full color

  • Simon Bolivar - A Life

    Simon Bolivar was a revolutionary who freed six countries, an intellectual who argued the principles of national liberation, and a general who fought a cruel colonial war. His life, passions, battles, and great victories became embedded in Spanish American culture almost as soon as they happened. This is the first major English-language biography of "The Liberator" in half a century. John Lynch draws on extensive research on the man and his era to tell Bolivar's story, to understand his life in the context of his own society and times, and to explore his remarkable and enduring legacy.
    The book illuminates the inner world of Bolivar, the dynamics of his leadership, his power to command, and his modes of ruling the diverse peoples of Spanish America. The key to his greatness, Lynch concludes, was supreme will power and an ability to inspire people to follow him beyond their immediate interests, in some cases through years of unremitting struggle. Encompassing Bolivar's entire life and his many accomplishments, this is the definitive account of a towering figure in the history of the Western hemisphere.

  • The Freedom of Man

    This volume is based upon the twelfth series of lectures delivered at Yale University on the Foundation established by the late Dwight H. Terry of Plymouth, Connecticut, through his gift of an endowment fund for the delivery and subsequent publication of "Lectures on Religion in the Light of Science and Philosophy." The deed of gift declares that "the object of this Foundation is not the promotion of scientific investigation and discovery, but rather the assimilation and interpretation of that which has been or shall be hereafter discovered, and its application to human welfare, especially by the building of the truths of science and philosophy into the structure of a broadened and purified religion.

  • Unpacking My Library - Architects and Their Books

    What does a library say about the mind of its owner? How do books map the intellectual interests, curiosities, tastes, and personalities of their readers? What does the collecting of books have in common with the practice of architecture? 'Unpacking My Library' provides an intimate look at the personal libraries of fourteen of the world's leading architects, alongside conversations about the significance of books to their careers and lives. Photographs of bookshelves - displaying well-loved and rare volumes, eclectic organizational schemes, and the individual touches that make a bookshelf one's own - provide an evocative glimpse of their owner's personal life. Each architect also presents a reading list of top ten influential titles, from architectural history to theory to fiction and nonfiction, that serves as a personal philosophy of literature and history, and advice on what every young architect, scholar, and lover of architecture should read. An inspiring cross-section of notable libraries, this beautiful book celebrates the arts of reading and collecting. 'Architects and Their Books' features the libraries of: Stan Allen, Henry Cobb, Liz Diller & Ric Scofidio, Peter Eisenman, Michael Graves, Steven Holl, Toshiko Mori, Richard Meier, Michael Sorkin, Robert A. M. Stern, Bernard Tschumi, Todd Williams and Billie Tsien.

  • The Parisian Jazz Chronicles - An Improvisational Memoir

    An engaging personal account of the jazz scene in Paris in the '80s and '90s

    In his Beat-like jaunt through the Parisian and European jazz scene, Mike Zwerin is not unlike Jack Kerouac, Mezz Mezzrow, or Hunter S. Thompson--writers to whom, for different reasons, he owes some allegiance. What makes him special is his devotion to the troubled musicians he idolizes, and a passion for music that is blessedly contagious.


    Many jazz fans will know Mike Zwerin for his witty, irreverent, and undeniably hip music reviews and articles in the International Herald Tribune that have entertained us for decades. Based in Paris, or, rather, stuck there, as Zwerin likes to say, he has been a music critic for the Trib since 1979. Zwerin also had a distinguished career as a trombonist. When he was just eighteen years old, he was invited by Miles Davis to play alongside Gerry Mulligan, John Lewis, and Max Roach in the band that was immortalized as The Birth of the Cool.


    The Parisian Jazz Chronicles offers an engaging personal account of the jazz scene in Paris in the 1980s and 1990s. Zwerin writes lovingly but unsparingly about figures he knew and interviewed-- such as Dexter Gordon, Freddy Heineken, Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Chet Baker, Wayne Shorter, and Melvin Van Peebles. Against this background, Zwerin tells about his own life--split allegiances to journalism and music, and to America and France, his solitary battle for sobriety, a failing marriage, and fatherhood.

  • The Arts of Intimacy - Christians, Jews and Muslims in the Making of Castilian Culture

    This lavishly illustrated book explores the vibrant interaction among different and sometimes opposing cultures, and how their contacts with one another transformed them all. It chronicles the tumultuous history of Castile in the wake of the Christian capture of the Islamic city of Tulaytula, now Toledo, in the eleventh century and traces the development of Castilian culture as it was forged in the new intimacy of Christians with the Muslims and Jews they had overcome. The authors paint a portrait of the culture through its arts, architecture, poetry and prose, uniquely combining literary and visual arts. Concentrating on the eleventh and twelfth centuries, the book reveals the extent to which Castilian identity is deeply rooted in the experience of confrontation, interaction, and at times union with Hebrew and Arabic cultures during the first centuries of its creation. Abundantly illustrated, the volume serves as a splendid souvenir of southern Spain; beautifully written, it illuminates a culture deeply enriched by others.

  • Impressionism, Paint and Politics - Making and Meaning

    A new perspective on Impressionist art that offers revealing, fresh interpretations of familiar paintings

    In this handsome book, a leading authority on Impressionist painting offers a new view of this admired and immensely popular art form. John House examines the style and technique, subject matter and imagery, exhibiting and marketing strategies, and social, political, and ideological contexts of Impressionism in light of the perspectives that have been brought to it in the last twenty years. When all of these diverse approaches are taken into account, he argues, Impressionism can be seen as a movement that challenged both artistic and political authority with its uncompromisingly modern subject matter and its determinedly secular worldview.

    Moving from the late 1860s to the early 1880s, House analyzes the paintings and career strategies of the leading Impressionist artists, pointing out the ways in which they countered the dominant conventions of the contemporary art world and evolved their distinctive and immediately recognizable manner of painting. Focusing closely on the technique, composition, and imagery of the paintings themselves and combining this fresh appraisal with recent historical studies of Impressionism, House explores how pictorial style could generate social and political meanings and opens new ways of looking at this luminous art.

  • A la Rencontre du Cinema Francais - Analyse, genre, histoire

    A la rencontre du cinema francais: analyse, genre, histoire is intended to serve as the core textbook in a wide variety of upper-level undergraduate and graduate French cinema courses. In contrast to content-, theme-, or issue-based approaches to film, Professor Berg stresses the cinematically specific, the warp and fabric of the film itself, the stuff of which it is made. Sufficient proficiency in French is the sole prerequisite: No previous back-ground in film studies is assumed, nor is any prior acquain-tance with French cinema. It will help, of course, to like movies, and to have seen quite a few (from the preface).

  • Napoleon: The Path to Power

    In the tradition of Goldsworthy's Caesar, a major biography of the young Napoleon and his improbable rise to power

    At just thirty years of age, Napoleon Bonaparte ruled the most powerful country in Europe. But the journey that led him there was neither inevitable nor smooth. This authoritative biography focuses on the evolution of Napoleon as a leader and debunks many of the myths that are often repeated about him--sensational myths often propagated by Napoleon himself. Here, Philip Dwyer sheds new light on Napoleon's inner life--especially his darker side and his passions--to reveal a ruthless, manipulative, driven man whose character has been disguised by the public image he carefully fashioned to suit the purposes of his ambition.

    Dwyer focuses acutely on Napoleon's formative years, from his Corsican origins to his French education, from his melancholy youth to his flirtation with radicals of the French Revolution, from his first military campaigns in Italy and Egypt to the political-military coup that brought him to power in 1799. One of the first truly modern politicians, Napoleon was a master of "spin," using the media to project an idealized image of himself. Dwyer's biography of the young Napoleon provides a fascinating new perspective on one of the great figures of modern history.

  • Encyclopedia of New York City 2e - Revised and Expanded

    Covering an exhaustive range of information about the five boroughs, the first edition of The Encyclopedia of New York City was a success by every measure, earning worldwide acclaim and several awards for reference excellence, and selling out its first printing before it was officially published. But much has changed since the volume first appeared in 1995: the World Trade Center no longer dominates the skyline, a billionaire businessman has become an unlikely three-term mayor, and urban regeneration - Chelsea Piers, the High Line, DUMBO, Williamsburg, the South Bronx, the Lower East Side - has become commonplace. To reflect such innovation and change, this definitive, one-volume resource on the city has been completely revised and expanded. The revised edition includes 800 new entries that help complete the story of New York: from Air Train to E-ZPass, from September 11 to public order. The new material includes broader coverage of subject areas previously underserved as well as new maps and illustrations. Virtually all existing entries - spanning architecture, politics, business, sports, the arts, and more - have been updated to reflect the impact of the past two decades. The more than 5,000 alphabetical entries and 700 illustrations of the second edition of The Encyclopedia of New York City convey the richness and diversity of its subject in great breadth and detail, and will continue to serve as an indispensable tool for everyone who has even a passing interest in the American metropolis.

  • American Presidential China - The Robert L. McNeil Jr., Collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

    The china used by the First Families, both at the White House and in their private homes, reveals a fascinating story of culture and society as it has evolved in the United States since its early days. In this handsome book, which documents over 200 rare items in the remarkably comprehensive Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Collection, a beautiful display of tableware unfolds as readers learn of trends in taste, style, and modes of entertaining, from George Washington to Ronald Reagan.

    Among the featured objects are Washington's white-and-gold Sevres porcelain that he purchased from a French diplomat recalled at the outbreak of the French Revolution; James Monroe's gilt-edged French porcelain service, the first state service commissioned by the White House in 1817; and John F. Kennedy's understated Wedgwood creamware used at his Georgetown home. Collectors and historians will value the information on how the pieces were commissioned, designed, manufactured, and imported.

  • Dove/O′Keeffe - Circles of Influence

    From the outset of her career, Georgia O'Keeffe credited her introduction to modernism as deriving in part from a reproduction of a pastel by Arthur Dove she saw around 1913. By this time Dove was well established as the foremost modernist artist in America, yet O'Keeffe herself would later become a source of renewal for his work. Renowned scholar Debra Bricker Balken here offers the first investigation into the inter-relationship between these two great artists. She shows that while Dove's sensual evocations of landscape - his abstractions of nature's undulating rhythms and forms - offered inspiration for O'Keeffe, the influence of O'Keeffe's work on Dove was equally significant. After 1930, Dove turned to O'Keeffe's early works for renewed aesthetic inspiration, mining, as he put it, her 'burning watercolors'. Beyond examining the impact of these mutual influences, this beautifully illustrated publication situates Dove and O'Keeffe within the circle of Alfred Stieglitz, and brings them into a fuller context within the modernist scene of the 1920s and 1930s. What emerges is a fascinating look at the first pivotal moment of modernism in America.

  • Heroes - Mortals and Myths in Ancient Greece

    This handsome volume explores the integral role of heroes in ancient Greek art and culture. It features more than a hundred stunning statues, reliefs, vases, bronzes, coins, and gems drawn from major American and European collections that highlight how heroes were represented, why they were important, and what encouraged individuals to seek them out. To contemporary eyes, Greek heroes embody contradiction: they might have superhuman powers, but their mortality was what made them heroic. Many were regarded as benevolent ancestors with powers to protect and heal, but others were dangerous and haunted spirits of the dead, who had to be appeased. Although epic, drama and the visual arts abound in representations of heroes whose fame has carried over into modern times, cult and funerary architecture commemorate many more individuals whose names and deeds are entirely lost to us. Featuring essays by leading authorities in the field, this book draws on recent archaeological, literary, and art historical research to explore such issues as gender, cult and iconography, as well as overlooked aspects of familiar and unfamiliar heroes.

  • Euan Uglow - The Complete Paintings

    British artist Euan Uglow (1932-2000) maintained a lower profile than others of his generation, yet his beautiful, intelligent, humane, and often witty landscapes, still lifes, and figure studies are today gaining the recognition they so clearly deserve. Many critics and admirers now consider Uglow one of Britain's greatest post-war artists. This is the first book devoted to Uglow and his oeuvre. Richard Kendall's essay explores Uglow's fundamental attitudes, beliefs, and processes in the years 1950 to 1970, and Catherine Lampert looks at the content and personal nature of the artist's paintings over a lifetime, emphasizing his growing attention to color and light. The volume reproduces every known oil painting by Uglow-a total of more than 400 works--some 80 of which are here reproduced for the first time. In addition to a chronology, bibliography, and exhibition history for each work, the catalogue entries provide many other details and illuminating notes, including the artist's own observations.

  • Hebrews

    One of early Christianity's most carefully crafted sermons, Epistle to the Hebrews addresses listeners who have experienced the elation of conversion and the heat of hostility, but who now must confront the formidable task of remaining faithful in a society that rejects their commitments. The letter probes into the one of most profound questions of faith: If it is God's will that believers be crowned with glory and honor, why are the faithful subject to suffering and shame? Through the stories of Abraham and Sarah, Moses, and Rahab, whose faith enabled them to overcome severe trials and conflicts, and through the story of Jesus himself, whose sufferings opened the way to God's presence for all, the sermon confirms the foundations of the Christian faith.

    In a magisterial introduction, Koester presents a compelling portrait of the early Christian community and examines the debates that have surrounded Epistle to the Hebrews for two millennia. Drawing on his knowledge of classical rhetoric, he clarifies the book's arguments and discusses the use of evocative language and imagery to appeal to its audience's minds, emotions, and will. Providing an authoritative, accessible discussion of the book's high priestly Christology, this landmark commentary charts new directions for the interpretation of Epistle to the Hebrews and its influence on Christian theology and worship.

  • Holy Bones, Holy Dust - How Relics Shaped the History of Medieval Europe

    Relics were everywhere in medieval society. Saintly morsels such as bones, blood, milk, hair, teeth, and clothes, and items like the Crown of Thorns, coveted by Louis IX of France, were thought to bring the believer closer to the saint who might intercede with God on his or her behalf. In the first comprehensive history in English of the rise of relic cults, Charles Freeman takes readers on a vivid, fast-paced journey from Constantinople to the northern Isles of Scotland over the course of a millennium. In 'Holy Bones, Holy Dust', Freeman illustrates that the pervasiveness and variety of relics answered very specific needs of ordinary people across a darkened Europe under threat of political upheavals, disease, and hellfire. But relics were not only venerated - they were traded, collected, lost, stolen, duplicated and destroyed. They were bargaining chips, good business and good propaganda, politically appropriated across Europe, and even used to wield military power. Freeman examines an expansive array of relics, showing how the mania for these objects deepens our understanding of the medieval world and why these relics continue to capture our imagination.

  • Caesar: Life of a Colossus

    The first major biography of Julius Caesar in decades, this volume offers an astonishingly intimate and complex view of the life of this singular leader

    Tracing the extraordinary trajectory of the great Roman emperor's life, Goldsworthy covers not only the great Roman emperor's accomplishments as charismatic orator, conquering general, and powerful dictator but also lesser-known chapters during which he was high priest of an exotic cult, captive of pirates, seducer not only of Cleopatra but also of the wives of his two main political rivals, and rebel condemned by his own country. Ultimately, Goldsworthy realizes the full complexity of Caesar's character and shows why his political and military leadership continues to resonate some two thousand years later. In the introduction to his biography of the great Roman emperor, Adrian Goldsworthy writes, "Caesar was at times many things, including a fugitive, prisoner, rising politician, army leader, legal advocate, rebel, dictator . . . as well as husband, father, lover and adulterer." In this landmark biography, Goldsworthy examines Caesar as military leader, all of these roles and places his subject firmly within the context of Roman society in the first century B.C.

  • Walden

    This handsome, affordable paperback edition of Walden is the most authoritative version of Henry David Thoreau's classic American literarymasterpiece to date. Jeffrey Cramer's newly edited text is based on the original 1854 edition of Walden, with emendations taken from Thoreau's draft manuscripts, his own markings on page proofs, and notes in his personal copy of the book. An elegantly produced paperback, it has been priced especially with the student market in mind. An introduction by Denis Donoghue places Thoreau's life and achievement in context. Also included here are notes on the text, an afterword by the editor, and a helpful selected bibliography.

  • Oceania - Art of the Pacific Islands in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    In aesthetic quality, significance, and scope, the Metropolitan Museum's Oceanic, or Pacific Islands, collection is one of the finest and most comprehensive in the world. This generously illustrated volume features some 200 masterworks from the more than 2,600 objects currently in the collection, and it is published to coincide with the opening of the Museum's new galleries of Oceanic art.

    An overview of Oceanic art and a history of the Metropolitan's collection are followed by detailed chapters devoted to each of the five major cultural regions of the Pacific: Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, and the islands of Southeast Asia. Among the notable works discussed are a monumental Baining barkcloth figure, a spectacular shield from the Solomon Islands, the Museum's renowned Torres Strait mask and acclaimed Mangarevan wooden male figure, a weather charm from the Caroline Islands, and textiles from the regions of Lampung and Sumba, in Sumatra. A glossary and selected bibliography conclude this essential guide.

  • Calvin

    During the glory days of the French Renaissance, young John Calvin (1509-1564) experienced a profound conversion to the faith of the Reformation. For the rest of his days he lived out the implications of that transformation - as exile, inspired reformer, and ultimately the dominant figure of the Protestant Reformation. Calvin's vision of the Christian religion has inspired many volumes of analysis, but this engaging biography examines a remarkable life. Bruce Gordon presents Calvin as a human being, a man at once brilliant, arrogant, charismatic, unforgiving, generous, and shrewd. The book explores with particular insight Calvin's self-conscious view of himself as prophet and apostle for his age and his struggle to tame a sense of his own superiority, perceived by others as arrogance. Gordon looks at Calvin's character, his maturing vision of God and humanity, his personal tragedies and failures, his extensive relationships with others, and the context within which he wrote and taught. What emerges is a man who devoted himself to the Church, inspiring and transforming the lives of others, especially those who suffered persecution for their religious beliefs.

  • The Tragedy of the Soviet Countryside - The War Against the Peasantry, 1927-1930 V 1

    The collectivization of Soviet agriculture in the late 1920s and 1930s forever altered the country's social and economic landscape. It became the first of a series of bloody landmarks that would come to define Stalinism. This revelatory book presents--with analysis and commentary--the most important primary Soviet documents dealing with the brutal economic and cultural subjugation of the Russian peasantry. Drawn from previously unavailable and in many cases unknown archives, these harrowing documents provide the first unimpeded view of the experience of the peasantry during the years 1927-1930.
    The book, the first of four in the series, covers the background of collectivization, its violent implementation, and the mass peasant revolt that ensued. For its insights into the horrific fate of the Russian peasantry and into Stalin's dictatorship, The War Against the Peasantry takes its place an as unparalleled resource.

  • Georgia o′Keeffe and the Camera - The Art of Indentity

    From her appearance as a provocative young artist in Alfred Stieglitzs photographs to her depiction as a grande dame of the art world in silkscreens by Andy Warhol, Georgia OKeeffe captivated the media with her image of a woman as bold as her art. This beautifully illustrated book tells the stories behind the portraits of one of the twentieth centurys foremost American painters. OKeeffes professional and personal relationships with the leading photographers of her time come to light, as does her ability to shape public perceptions of her career. Stieglitz first created photographs of his protegee posing in front of her abstract artworks as a manifestation of a sexually liberated woman. OKeeffe later redefined her image, sometimes working with photographers at her homes in New Mexico, where she emerged as a rugged individualist among the animal bones and gnarled trees that she often painted. This publication brings together for the first time photographs by Stieglitz, Newman, Loengard, Webb, and others - many of which probe fascinating tensions between abstractionism and realism in OKeeffes art. In addition, a selection of OKeeffes works chronicles the span of her long career.

  • Moving Rooms - The Trade in Archtectural Salvages

    Since at least Tudor times there have been architectural salvages: panelling, chimney pieces, doorways, or any fixtures and fittings might be removed from an old interior to be replaced by more fashionable ones. Not surprisingly a trade developed and architects, builders, masons, and sculptors sought out these salvages. By 1820 there was a growing profession of brokers and dealers in London, and a century later antique shops were commonplace throughout England.

    This fascinating book documents the break-up, sale, and re-use of salvages in Britain and America, where the fashion for so-called "Period Rooms" became a mainstay of the transatlantic trade. Much appreciated by museum visitors, period rooms have become something of a scholarly embarrassment, as research reveals that many were assembled from a variety of sources. One American embraced the trade as no other--the larger-than-life William Randolph Hearst--who purchased tens of thousands of architectural salvages between 1900 and 1935.

  • Cy Twombly: The Natural World, Selected Works, 2000-2007

    Cy Twombly's distinctive artworks merge drawing, painting, and symbolic gesture in the pursuit of a direct, intuitive form of expression. Much of the artist's recent output interprets the natural world, often through references to gardens and landscapes. 'Cy Twombly: The Natural World, Selected Works, 2000-2007' features more than 30 paintings, works on paper, photographs, and sculptures. Published in full cooperation with the artist, this handsome book speaks to both continuity and innovation in Twombly's work, underscoring the ongoing creative vitality of one of the greatest American artists of our time.

  • Of Africa

    A member of the unique generation of African writers and intellectuals who came of age in the last days of colonialism, Wole Soyinka has witnessed the promise of independence and lived through postcolonial failure. He deeply comprehends the pressing problems of Africa, and, an irrepressible essayist and a staunch critic of the oppressive boot, he unhesitatingly speaks out. In this magnificent new work, Soyinka offers a wide ranging inquiry into Africa's culture, religion, history, imagination, and identity. He seeks to understand how the continent's history is entwined with the histories of others, while exploring Africa's truest assets: 'its humanity, the quality and valuation of its own existence, and modes of managing its environment both physical and intangible (which includes the spiritual)'. Fully grasping the extent of Africa's most challenging issues, Soyinka nevertheless refuses defeatism. With eloquence he analyzes problems ranging from the meaning of the past to the threat of theocracy. He asks hard questions about racial attitudes, inter ethnic and religious violence, the viability of nations whose boundaries were laid out by outsiders, African identity on the continent and among displaced Africans, and more. Soyinka's exploration of Africa relocates the continent in the reader's imagination and maps a course toward an African future of peace and affirmation.

  • Architecture on the Edge of Postmodernism - Collected Essays 1964-1988

    Robert A. M. Stern is one of contemporary architecture's most influential figures, with a career encompassing every facet of the profession: he has a flourishing private practice, he is a noted authority on New York architectural history, his own architectural work has been featured in numerous monographs and, as Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, he has undeniably shaped the field of architectural education. As a preeminent force in the discourse of the field, Stern was one of the first critics to use and analyze the term 'postmodern' in architecture. This collection of essays - Stern's first - brackets the years defined by the changes in architectural thinking introduced by Robert Venturi in 1966 and the exhibition ,Deconstructivist Architecture, at the Museum of Modern Art in 1988. Throughout, Stern provides close readings of architectural events and offers firsthand accounts of transformations in architectural thinking during a critical period.

  • The Age of Impressionism at the Art Institute of Chicago

    The Art Institute of Chicago has one of the largest and finest holdings of late-19th-century French art in the world. This lavishly illustrated book features over ninety paintings - nearly the entire collection - engagingly discussed in terms of the context in which so much memorable art was produced. It offers a fascinating overview of the Impressionist movement and its legacy, drawing upon the latest art-historical findings. The volume first explores works by artists who sought official sanction by the French Academy, from Edouard Manet, notorious for his bold and direct style, to Boudin and Jongkind, known for their light effects and deft brushwork. Paintings by Caillebotte, Degas, Monet, Pissarro, and Sisley offer insight on such topics as contemporary life, the changing quality of light, and painting outdoors. The final section examines works of artists influenced by Impressionism but compelled to explore new avenues of expression, including those of Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Seurat, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Each image, handsomely reproduced, exemplifies the diversity of ideas and extraordinary wealth of talent at work in late-19th-century France. A fascinating illustrated chronology of the formation of this world-renowned collection is also included.

  • Seeing in the Dark

    In this absorbing book, States explores the relationship between waking experience and dreams, and between dreams and literary creativity. Challenging the classic psychoanalytic view that dreams represent censored wishes, States argues that dreams are nonrepressive, unplanned constructions and that, like art, they are manifestations of a biological need to convert experience into structure. "States is the best writer on dreams since Freud. His engaging and eloquent book continually provokes rethinking of contemporary views of the mind, consciousness, dreaming, and the continuities between dreaming and literature."-Murray M. Schwartz "Bert State's Seeing in the Dark is a lively and informative book, which provides an invaluable update on current dream theory. . . . It dreams of a wide readership and I hope it gets one."-Alec Marsh, Boston Book Review "States writes with such lucidity and charm that it can well be managed by the non-academic reader with plenty of intellectual curiosity."-Rosemary Dinnage, Times Literary Supplement "This is a well-written and genial book filled with insights into both the nature of dreams and the nature of creativity."-Harold Fromm, The Hudson Review "The book has a wonderful essence of its own, as the author weaves humor and intelligence, creating his 'cubistic' work. . . . The book is serious and well researched, yet entertaining and fun to read. . . . An important work in dream theory and an asset to collections that incorporate multiple viewpoints. A delightful read."-Choice

  • Spaces of Experience: Art Gallery Interiors from 1800 to 2000

    This fascinating study of art gallery interiors examines the changing ideals and practices of galleries in Europe and North America from the eighteenth to the late twentieth century. It offers a detailed account of the different displays that have been created - the colors of the background walls, lighting, furnishings, the height and density of the art works on show - and it traces the different scientific, political and commercial influences that lay behind their development. Charlotte Klonk shows that scientists like Hermann von Helmholtz and Wilhelm Wundt advanced theories of perception that played a significant role in justifying new modes of exhibiting. Equally important for the changing modes of exhibition in art galleries was what Michael Baxandall has called 'the period eye', a way of seeing informed by the impact of new fashions in interior decoration and by department store and shop window displays. The history of museum interiors, she argues, should be appreciated as a revealing chapter in the broader history of experience.

  • Italian Through Film - A Text for Italian Courses

    This supplementary text for elementary to intermediate courses in Italian is structured around stimulating discussions of ten contemporary Italian films, among them Cinema Paradiso, La vita e bella, Mediterraneo, and Il postino. With a chapter devoted to each movie, the book effectively fosters a deeper understanding of both Italian language and culture, and it is adaptable for any level of language instruction.

    Italian Through Film features:

    • Films that are easily available from school video libraries or from video stores;
    • Pre-viewing, viewing, and post-viewing activities appropriate to the various films in each chapter;
    • Grammar review, vocabulary in context, listening comprehension, cultural and historical background, and discussion questions for language practice;
    • Exercises ranging in difficulty from elementary to highly sophisticated that are designed to enhance students' vocabulary and cultural awareness as well as oral and written skills;
    • Boxed sections that provide information about the movie, director, plot, and certain cultural aspects specific to each movie;
    • Lists of Internet-based activities that expand aspects of each movie by exploring Italian websites.

  • The Artist′s Reality - Philosophies of Art

    A recently discovered book manuscript by the celebrated artist Mark Rothko offering a landmark discussion of his views on topics ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary art, criticism, and the role of art and artists in society

    One of the most important artists of the twentieth century, Mark Rothko (1903-1970) created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting over the course of his career. Rothko also wrote a number of essays and critical reviews during his lifetime, adding his thoughtful, intelligent, and opinionated voice to the debates of the contemporary art world. Although the artist never published a book of his varied and complex views, his heirs indicate that he occasionally spoke of the existence of such a manuscript to friends and colleagues. Stored in a New York City warehouse since the artist's death more than thirty years ago, this extraordinary manuscript, titled The Artist's Reality, is now being published for the first time.

    Probably written around 1940-41, this revelatory book discusses Rothko's ideas on the modern art world, art history, myth, beauty, the challenges of being an artist in society, the true nature of "American art," and much more. The Artist's Reality alsoincludes an introduction by Christopher Rothko, the artist's son, who describes the discovery of the manuscript and the complicated and fascinating process of bringing the manuscript to publication. The introduction is illustrated with a small selection of relevant examples of the artist's own work as well as with reproductions of pages from the actual manuscript.

    The Artist's Reality willbe a classic text for years to come, offering insight into both the work and the artistic philosophies of this great painter.

  • Albers And Moholy-Nagy: From the Bauhaus to the New World

    This beautifully illustrated book highlights the contrasts and correspondences in the lives and work of two of Modernism s greatest innovators, Josef Albers (18881976) and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (18951947). Beginning in the 1930s, Albers and Moholy-Nagy each developed a rigorously abstract language that condensed art to its visual fundamentals: line, color, texture, light, and form. This language experienced a creative explosion during their Bauhaus years, when both artists moved freely between media and disciplines. Essays by leading scholars follow the artists separate paths through to their emigration to the United States, where each continued to push tirelessly the conventions of artistic practiceAlbers at Black Mountain College in North Carolina and then at Yale University, and Moholy-Nagy in Chicago at the New Bauhaus School and the Institute of Design. As highly influential teachers, Albers and Moholy-Nagy became important catalysts for the transmission of Modernist ideas from Europe to America.
    Spanning four decades and featuring works in a variety of media, including painting, collage, glass, moving sculpture, photography, film, furniture, and graphic design, Albers and Moholy-Nagy reveals for the first time the range of achievement of these two important figures and is essential to our understanding of the evolution of Modernism."

  • Somerset - North and Bristol - The Buildings of England

    This fully revised survey is the essential companion to the architecture of one of England's most rewarding regions. The Georgian spa of Bath and the medieval cathedral city of Wells are deservedly famous, each the finest of its kind in the country. A separate section covers the port of Bristol, with its rich and confident buildings of every period and type. Other highlights include John Nash's picturesque masterpiece of Blaise Hamlet, a noble inheritance of Gothic Revival churches, and some of the greatest structures designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

  • Edouard Baldus at the Chateau de la Faloise

    Previously announced

    Edouard Baldus (1813-1889) was the most important French architectural photographer of the mid-19th century. This book offers an in-depth exploration of one of his most intriguing projects--a remarkable series of views of the Chateau de La Faloise, in which his subject was not primarily the country house but the owner and his family at leisure on its grounds. James A. Ganz locates the photographs at a key moment in Baldus's career and during one of the most eventful decades in the history of French photography, showing that they stand at a crossroad between the English "conversation piece" and the birth of Impressionist portraiture in the early paintings of Monet and Bazille.

  • The Birth of Time: How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe

    The age of the universe has been one of the great scientific mysteries of our time. This engrossing book tells the story of how the mystery was recently solved. Written by a brilliant science writer who was involved, as a research astronomer, in the final breakthrough, the book provides details of the ongoing controversies among scientists as they groped their way to the truth--that the universe is between 13 and 16 billion years old, older by at least one billion years than the star systems it contains.
    In clear, engaging language, Gribbin takes us through the history of cosmological discoveries, focusing in particular on the seventy years since the Big Bang model of the origin of the universe. He explains how conflicting views of the age of the universe and stars converged in the 1990s because scientists (including Gribbin) were able to use data from the Hubble Space Telescope that measured distances across the universe.

  • Blood and Soil - A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur

    For thirty years Ben Kiernan has been deeply involved in the study of genocide and crimes against humanity. He has played a key role in unearthing confidential documentation of the atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge. His writings have transformed our understanding not only of twentieth-century Cambodia but also of the historical phenomenon of genocide. This new book, the first global history of genocide and extermination from ancient times, is among his most important achievements.Kiernan examines outbreaks of mass violence from the classical era to the present, focusing on worldwide colonial exterminations and twentieth-century case studies including the Armenian genocide, the Nazi Holocaust, Stalin's mass murders, and the Cambodian and Rwandan genocides. He identifies connections, patterns, and features that in nearly every case gave early warning of the catastrophe to come: racism or religious prejudice, territorial expansionism, and cults of antiquity and agrarianism. The ideologies that have motivated perpetrators of mass killings in the past persist in our new century, says Kiernan. He urges that we heed the rich historical evidence with its telltale signs for predicting and preventing future genocides.

  • Black Square - Malevich and the Origin of Suprematism

    An in-depth exploration of Malevich's pivotal painting, its context and its significance

    Kazimir Malevich's painting Black Square is one of the twentieth century's emblematic paintings, the visual manifestation of a new period in world artistic culture at its inception. None of Malevich's contemporary revolutionaries created a manifesto, an emblem, as capacious and in its own way unique as this work; it became both the quintessence of the Russian avant-gardist's own art--which he called Suprematism--and a milestone on the highway of world art. Writing about this single painting, Aleksandra Shatskikh sheds new light on Malevich, the Suprematist movement, and the Russian avant-garde.

    Malevich devoted his entire life to explicating Black Square's meanings. This process engendered a great legacy: the original abstract movement in painting and its theoretical grounding; philosophical treatises; architectural models; new art pedagogy; innovative approaches to theater, music, and poetry; and the creation of a new visual environment through the introduction of decorative applied designs. All of this together spoke to the tremendous potential for innovative shape and thought formation concentrated in Black Square.

    To this day, many circumstances and events of the origins of Suprematism have remained obscure and have sprouted arbitrary interpretations and fictions. Close study of archival materials and testimonies of contemporaries synchronous to the events described has allowed this author to establish the true genesis of Suprematism and its principal painting.

  • Who Governs? - Democracy and Power in the American City 2e

    In this now-classic work, one of the most celebrated political scientists of the twentieth century offers a powerful interpretation of the location of political power in American urban communities. For this new edition, Robert A. Dahl has written a new Preface in which he reflects on Who Governs? more than four decades after its publication. And in a new Foreword, Douglas W. Rae offers an assessment of Dahl's achievement in this, Dahl's greatest and most influential book. "Dahl is never dogmatic, and never imagines that the world stands still to accommodate either the democratic ideal or his own pluralistic theory of city politics. . . .Who Governs? is Dahl's liveliest and most remarkable book."--Douglas W. Rae, from the Foreword From reviews of the first edition: "A book that no one interested in politics can afford to ignore."--Lewis A. Coser, Commentary "Anyone seriously concerned with current systematic political theory or with urban politics should read Who Governs?"--Hugh Douglas Price, Political Science Quarterly "A sophisticated and undogmatic treatise on democratic politics."--Heinz Eulau, American Political Science Review "Dahl has illuminated a central question in political science, the problem of how men can govern themselves in complex societies. . . . Who Governs? will become a classic."--from the citation of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award

  • Pop Art - Contemporary Perspectives

    Announcing the new Princeton University Art Museum Monograph Series:
    Princeton University Art Museum Monographs is a new series of in-depth explorations of the museum's rich collections. Beautifully designed and produced, these books by leading and emerging scholars offer new insights and perspectives on a single work or group of works from Princeton's distinguished permanent collection.
    Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Tom Wesselmann, Robert Indiana, and Alex Katz have all come to define the Pop art movement that emerged in America in the 1960s. This handsomely illustrated book focuses on 40 understudied and rarely seen late paintings, works on paper, and sculptures by these influential artists in the collection of the Princeton University Art Museum.
    Pop Art offers fresh insights into the ways in which artists radically transformed the mediums of painting and sculpture. For example, Lichtenstein is repositioned as a classical "studio artist"; Wesselmann is shown to be playfully preoccupied with academic genres; and Indiana is interpreted less as a Pop artist than as a folk artist in a mass-cultural context. This important book also features an engaging introduction by Hal Foster that places these new interpretations in the context of the history of Pop art and its critical literature.

  • The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia Under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79

    What was the nature of the regime that turned Cambodia into grisly killing fields and murdered or starved to death 1.7 million of the country's eight million inhabitants? In this account of the Khmer Rouge revolution, Ben Kiernan shows how an ideological preoccupation with racist and totalitarian policies led a group of intellectuals to impose genocide on their own country. This edition includes a new preface recounting the fatal disintegration of the Khmer Rouge army, the death of Pol Pot, the United Nations' foray into the struggle to bring his surviving accomplices to justice, and the damning new evidence they could face.

  • Arms And Influence - With a New Preface and Afterword

    Traditionally, Americans have viewed war as an alternative to diplomacy, and military strategy as the science of victory. Today, however, in our world of nuclear weapons, military power is not so much exercised as threatened. It is, Mr. Schelling says, bargaining power, and the exploitation of this power, for good or evil, to preserve peace or to threaten war, is diplomacy--the diplomacy of violence. The author concentrates in this book on the way in which military capabilities--real or imagined--are used, skillfully or clumsily, as bargaining power. He sees the steps taken by the U.S. during the Berlin and Cuban crises as not merely preparations for engagement, but as signals to an enemy, with reports from the adversary's own military intelligence as our most important diplomatic communications. Even the bombing of North Vietnam, Mr. Schelling points out, is as much coercive as tactical, aimed at decisions as much as bridges. He carries forward the analysis so brilliantly begun in his earlier The Strategy of Conflict (1960) and Strategy and Arms Control (with Morton Halperin, 1961), and makes a significant contribution to the growing literature on modern war and diplomacy. Stimson Lectures.Mr. Schelling is professor of economics at Harvard and acting director of Harvard's Center for International Affairs. "An exemplary text on the interplay of national purpose and military force."--Book Week. "A grim but carefully reasoned and coldly analytical book. . . . One of the most frightening previews which this reviewer has ever seen of the roads that lie just ahead in warfare."--Los Angeles Times. "A brilliant and hardheaded book. It will frighten those who prefer not to dwell on the unthinkable and infuriate those who have taken refuge in the stereotypes and moral attitudinizing."--New York Times Book Review.

  • The Federalist Papers

    This authoritative edition of the complete texts of the 'Federalist Papers', the Articles of Confederation, the U.S. Constitution, and the Amendments to the U.S. Constitution features supporting essays in which leading scholars provide historical context and analysis. An introduction by Ian Shapiro offers an overview of the publication of the 'Federalist Papers' and their importance. In three additional essays, John Dunn explores the composition of the 'Federalist Papers' and the conflicting agendas of its authors; Eileen Hunt Botting explains how early advocates of women's rights, most prominently Mercy Otis Warren, Judith Sargent Murray and Charles Brockden Brown, responded to the Federalist-Antifederalist debates; and Donald Horowitz discusses the 'Federalist Papers' from the perspective of recent experiments with democracy and constitution-making around the world. These essays both illuminate the original texts and encourage active engagement with them.

  • The Patient as Person - Exploration in Medical Ethics 2e

    As physicians are faced with new and wonderful options for saving lives, transplanting organs, and furthering research, they also must wrestle with new and troubling choices--who should receive scarce and vital treatment, how we determine when life ends, what limits should be placed on care for the dying, and more. This book by renowned theologian Paul Ramsey, first published thirty years ago, anticipated these moral and ethical issues and addressed them with cogency and power, providing the intellectual foundations for the field of bioethics. This second edition of Ramsey's classic work includes a new foreword by Margaret Farley and essays by Albert R. Jonsen and William F. May that help to locate and interpret Ramsey historically and intellectually.

    Praise for the earlier edition:
    "For its strong, well-argued positions, its documentation and references, and its assistance in bringing confused strands of thought into focus, The Patient as Person willbe used for many years."--Michael Novak, New York Times

    "Amid the plethora of books on medical ethics that merely skim the surface, this one solidly examines most aspects of the question--from the definition of death to organ transplantation."--Christianity Today

    "Notable for its clear moral reasoning and its thorough examination of all morally relevant issues."--Journal of Religion

    "[Ramsey's] study is a masterpiece of thoroughness in evaluating conflicting moral claims which become explicit in crucial medical situations."--Dolores Dooley-Clarke, Philosophical Studies

  • Architecture in the Balkans - From Diocletian to Suleyman the Magnificent, 300-1550

    This book is the first of its kind to discuss the history of the Balkan Peninsula from late antiquity to the height of the Ottoman era by focusing on architecture as its principal gauge. In doing so, it transcends various established conventions in scholarship to present the architectural heritage in the Balkans in a manner that is accessible and comprehensible. Throughout the book architecture is viewed as a function of distinctive needs (social, political, religious), distinctive means (economic, technical know-how, material availability) and distinctive goals (aesthetic, propagandistic, protective). As a result, the book covers the full range of architectural enterprises, from simple residential buildings, to public monumental structures; from fortifications, to utilitarian buildings (cisterns, bridges, etc). The urban context of architecture is emphasized, while its role in rural settings is used as a gauge of other distinctive phenomena. Illustrated with several hundreds of photographs and drawings, most of them specially commissioned, the book presents a generally unknown body of material in a distinctive, unprecedented manner.

  • John Payne Collier - Scholarship and Forgery in the Nineteenth Century 2V Set

    John Payne Collier (1789-1883), one of the most controversial figures in the history of literary scholarship, pursued a double career. A prolific and highly influential writer on the drama, poetry, and popular prose of Shakespeare's age, Collier was at the same time the promulgator of a great body of forgeries and false evidence, seriously affecting the text and biography of Shakespeare and many others. This monumental two-volume work for the first time addresses the whole of Collier's activity, systematically sorting out his genuine achievements from his impostures.
    Arthur and Janet Freeman reassess the scholar-forger's long life, milieu, and relations with a large circle of associates and rivals while presenting a chronological bibliography of his extensive publications, all fully annotated with regard to their creditability. The authors also survey the broader history of literary forgery in Great Britain and consider why so talented a man not only yielded to its temptations but also persisted in it throughout his life.

  • The Lure of China - Writers from Marco Polo to J. G. Ballard

    Medieval travellers like Marco Polo created a romantic picture of a distant and exotic land while subsequent Jesuit and diplomatic missions sought to correct the more lurid depictions with first-hand accounts. In the mid-nineteenth century China was opened to travellers, collectors and writers of all sorts. Explorers were drawn to the Silk Road and its buried treasures. Writers like Andre Malraux and Vicki Baum found fame with books set in Peking and Shanghai, and Somerset Maugham with his enchanting vignettes. More recently Ernest Hemingway and Martha Gellhorn reported from China, as did W. H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, and the American journalist Edgar Snow. Frances Wood tracks the visits of Harold Acton, Osbert Sitwell, Noel Coward, George Bernard Shaw and Bertrand Russell, and the Chinese childhoods of Pearl Buck and J. G. Ballard. 'It was as if China made writers of them all', Wood observes, as she trawls a vast library of fiction, memoir and travelogue in this captivating and beautifully illustrated journey.

  • Angels of Death: Exploring the Euthanasia Underground

    An exploration of the hidden world of illicit physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. Through the frank and often troubling first-hand accounts of health professionals who have been involved in assisted death, it records this secret but real area of medical and nursing practice. Through face-to-face interviews with these "angels of death", Roger S. Magnusson explores the social practices, relationships and networks that constitute "underground" euthanasia. How is assisted death actually practised within health care settings? What are the issues that surround the making of such a momentous decision? How do health care workers justify their attitudes and actions in this area? This volume aims to offer detailed answers to these questions and many others. The doctors, nurses and therapists who were interviewed pseudonymously for this study work in the HIV/AIDS communities in the United States and Australia. Their perspectives and practices, attitudes and feelings, should illuminate the assisted death debate and expose a variety of disturbing issues, including the reality of "botched attempts", euthanasia without consent, and unduly hasty measures to bring about death.

  • The Ancient Oracles - Making the Gods Speak

    For more than a thousand years, Greeks from all walks of life consulted oracles for guidance received directly from the gods. This colorful and wide-ranging survey encompasses the entire history of Greek oracles and focuses fresh attention on philosophical, psychological, and anthropological aspects of oracular consultation. It also examines how Greek oracles' practices were distinctive compared to those of their neighbors, especially in Egypt, Babylon, and Israel.

    Richard Stoneman weaves a fascinating historical tapestry, taking into account the different kinds of oracles (healers, advisors, prophets, and others), their most important sanctuaries, debates about them among ancient thinkers, and Christian attacks on them. Delving into the reasons behind the oracles' enduring position at the heart of Greek culture, Stoneman offers fresh insights into pagan religious practice and the history of Greek intellectual and spiritual life.

  • Gulag - An Anthology

    Anne Applebaum wields her considerable knowledge of this dark chapter in history and presents a collection of the writings of survivors of the Gulag, the Soviet concentration camps. Although the opening of the Soviet archives to scholars has made it possible to write the history of this notorious concentration camp system, documents tell only one side of the story. Gulag: An Anthology now fills in the other half. The backgrounds of the writers reflect the extraordinary diversity of the Gulag itself. Here are the personal stories of figures such as renowned literary scholar Dmitri Likhachev; Anatoly Marchenko, the son of illiterate labourers; and American citizen Alexander Dolgun. These remembrances - many of them appearing in English for the first time, each chosen for both literary and historical value - collectively spotlight the strange moral universe of the camps, as well as the relationships that prisoners had with one another, with their guards, and with professional criminals who lived beside them. A vital addition to the literature of this era, annotated for a generation that no longer remembers the Soviet Union, Gulag: An Anthology will inform, interest, and inspire, offering a source for reflection on human nature itself.

  • Picasso and the Allure Of Language

    A revealing investigation into Picasso's career-long fascination with the written word

    Throughout his life, Pablo Picasso had close friendships with writers and an abiding interest in the written word. This groundbreaking book, which draws on the collections of Yale University, traces the relationship that Picasso had with literature and writing in his life and work.

    Beginning with the artist's early associations with such writers as Gertrude Stein, Guillaume Apollinaire, Max Jacob, and Pierre Reverdy, the book continues until the postwar period, by which time Picasso had become a worldwide celebrity. Distinguished authorities in art and literature explore the theme of Picasso and language from historical, linguistic, and visual perspectives and contextualize Picasso's work within a rich literary framework. Presenting fascinating archival materials and written in an accessible style, Picasso and the Allure of Language is essential reading for anyone interested in this great artist and the history of modernism.

  • The American Department Store Transformed 1920-1960

    After attaining classic stature with palaces erected in the early twentieth century, the American department store continued to evolve in ways that were influenced by changes in business practices, shopping patterns, design approaches, and urban structure. This masterful and innovative history of a celebrated building type focuses on many of the nation's greatest retail companies - Marshall Fields, Lord and Taylor, Gimbel's, Wanamaker's, and Bullock's, among others - and the role they played in defining America's cities. Author Richard Longstreth traces the development and evolution of department stores from local, urban institutions to suburban entities in the nation's sixty largest cities, showing how the stores underwent changes to adapt to dramatic economic and urban developments, including the decentralization from metropolitan areas, increased popularity of the automobile, and challenges from retail competitors on a national level. Extensively illustrated, this fascinating book offers a fundamental understanding of the transformation of main streets nationwide.

  • The Last Human - A Guide to Twenty Species of Extinct Human Ancestors

    The first opportunity to meet our extinct human ancestors face-to-face, through life-size reconstructions and detailed descriptions

    This book tells the story of human evolution, the epic of Homo sapiens and its colorful precursors and relatives. The story begins in Africa, six to seven million years ago, and encompasses twenty known human species, of which Homo sapiens is the sole survivor. Illustrated with spectacular, three-dimensional scientific reconstructions portrayed in their natural habitat developed by a team of physical anthropologists at the American Museum of Natural History and in concert with experts from around the world, the book is both a guide to extinct human species and an astonishing hominid family photo album. The Last Human presents a comprehensive account of each species with information on its emergence, chronology, geographic range, classification, physiology, lifestyle, habitat, environment, cultural achievements, co-existing species, and possible reasons for extinction. Also included are summaries of fossil discoveries, controversies, and publications. What emerges from the fossil story is a new understanding of Homo sapiens. No longer credible is the notion that our species is the end product of a single lineage, improved over generations by natural selection. Rather, the fossil record shows, we are a species with widely varied precursors, and our family tree is characterized by many branchings and repeated extinctions.

  • Pen and Parchment: Drawing in the Middle Ages

    In the Middle Ages, artists explored and tested the medium of drawing, producing whimsical sketches, illustrated treatises and finished drawings of extraordinary refinement. This fascinating volume is the first to examine and celebrate the achievements of medieval draftsmen in depth. It reproduces rarely seen leaves from more than fifty manuscripts dating from the 9th to the early 14th century. In the accompanying texts, Melanie Holcomb and other experts in the field consider the techniques, uses and aesthetics of medieval drawings, casting light on their critical role in the intellectual life of the Middle Ages.

  • Job: A New Translation

    This revelatory new translation of Job by one of the world's leading biblical scholars will reshape the way we read this canonical text

    The book of Job has often been called the greatest poem ever written. The book, in Edward Greenstein's characterization, is "a Wunderkind, a genius emerging out of the confluence of two literary streams" which "dazzles like Shakespeare with unrivaled vocabulary and a penchant for linguistic innovation." Despite the text's literary prestige and cultural prominence, no English translation has come close to conveying the proper sense of the original. The book has consequently been misunderstood in innumerable details and in its main themes.

    Edward Greenstein's new translation of Job is the culmination of decades of intensive research and painstaking philological and literary analysis, offering a major reinterpretation of this canonical text. Through his beautifully rendered translation and insightful introduction and commentary, Greenstein presents a new perspective: Job, he shows, was defiant of God until the end. The book is more about speaking truth to power than the problem of unjust suffering.

  • In the Studio - Visits with Contemporary Cartoonists

    Nine critically acclaimed cartoonists and graphic novelists invite us into their studios to discuss their art and inspirations

    These studio visits with some of today's most popular and innovative comic artists present an unparalleled look at the cutting edge of the comic medium. The artists, some of whom rarely grant interviews, offer insights into the creative process, their influences and personal sources of inspiration, and the history of comics. The interviews amount to private gallery tours, with the artists commenting, now thoughtfully, now passionately, on their own work as well as the works of others. The book is generously illustrated with full-color reproductions of the artists' works, including some that have been published and others not originally intended for publication, such as sketchbooks and personal projects. Additional illustrations show behind-the-scenes working processes of the cartoonists and particular works by others that have influenced or inspired them. Through the eyes of these artists, we see with a new clarity the achievement of contemporary cartoonists and the extraordinary possibilities of comic art.

  • Long Day's Journey into Night

    Eugene O'Neill's autobiographical play Long Day's Journey into Night isregarded as his finest work. First published by Yale University Press in 1956, it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1957 and has since sold more than one million copies. This edition, which includes a new foreword by Harold Bloom, coincides with a new production of the play starring Brian Dennehy, which opens in Chicago in January 2002 and in New York in April.

    "By common consent, Long Day's Journey into Night isEugene O'Neill's masterpiece. . . . The helplessness of family love to sustain, let alone heal, the wounds of marriage, of parenthood, and of sonship, have never been so remorselessly and so pathetically portrayed, and with a force of gesture too painful ever to be forgotten by any of us." --Harold Bloom, from the foreword

    "Only an artist of O'Neill's extraordinary skill and perception can draw the curtain on the secrets of his own family to make you peer into your own. Long Day's Journey into Night is the most remarkable achievement of one of the world's greatest dramatists." --Jose Quintero

    "The play is an invaluable key to its author's creative evolution. It serves as the Rosetta Stone of O'Neill's life and art." --Barbara Gelb

    "The definitive edition of a 'play of old sorrow, written in tears and blood, ' as O'Neill described it in dedicating it to his wife, Carlotta." --Boston Globe

  • Pilgrims - New World Settlers and the Call of Home

    This book uncovers what might seem to be a dark side of the American dream: the New World from the viewpoint of those who decided not to stay. At the core of the volume are the life-histories of people who left New England during the British Civil Wars and Interregnum, 1640-1660. More than a third of the ministers who had stirred up emigration from England deserted their flocks to return home. The colonists' stories challenge our perceptions of early settlement and the religious ideal of New England as a 'City on a Hill'. America was a stage in their journey, not an end in itself. Susan Hardman Moore first explores the motives for migration to New England in the 1630s and the rhetoric that surrounded it. Then, drawing on extensive original research into the lives of hundreds of migrants, she outlines the complex reasons that spurred many to brave the Atlantic again, homeward bound. Her book ends with the fortunes of colonists back home and looks at the impact of their American experience. Of exceptional value to studies of the connections between the Old and New Worlds, 'Pilgrims' contributes to debates about the nature of the New England experiment and its significance for the tumults of Revolutionary England.

  • The King Never Smiles - A Biography of Thailand′s Bhumibol Adulyadej

    The first independent biography of Thailand's monarch, whose image as a benign Buddhist god-king masks one of the world's most politically powerful thrones

    Thailand's Bhumibol Adulyadej, the only king ever born in the United States, came to the throne of his country in 1946 and at the time of his death, in October 2016, was the world's longest serving monarch. The King Never Smiles, the first independent biography of Thailand's monarch, tells the unexpected story of Bhumibol's life and sixty-year rule--how a Western-raised boy came to be seen by his people as a living Buddha, and how a king widely seen as beneficent and apolitical could in fact be so deeply political and autocratic.

    Paul Handley provides an extensively researched, factual account of the king's youth and personal development, ascent to the throne, skillful political maneuverings, and attempt to shape Thailand as a Buddhist kingdom. Handley takes full note of Bhumibol's achievements in art, in sports and jazz, and he credits the king's lifelong dedication to rural development and the livelihoods of his poorest subjects. But, looking beyond the widely accepted image of the king as egalitarian and virtuous, Handley portrays an anti-democratic monarch who, together with allies in big business and the corrupt Thai military, has protected a centuries-old, barely modified feudal dynasty.

    When at nineteen Bhumibol assumed the throne, the Thai monarchy had been stripped of power and prestige. Over the ensuing decades, Bhumibol became the paramount political actor in the kingdom, silencing critics while winning the hearts and minds of his people. The book details this process and depicts Thailand's unique constitutional monarch--his life, his thinking, and his ruling philosophy.

  • Vulcan′s Fury - Man Against the Volcano

    Volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular displays in the natural world. They also present humanity with devastating environmental disasters. This enthralling book describes fifteen of the most remarkable volcanic eruptions across the centuries and, using rare firsthand accounts, analyzes their impact on the people in their paths.

    In 79 a.d. Vesuvius produced the most violent eruption recorded in European history. The eruption of Etna in 1669 marked the first known attempt to divert a lava-flow. In 1783, the eruption of Laki indirectly killed a fifth of the Icelandic population and sent a blue haze over Europe. The eruption of Krakatau in 1883 drowned most of its victims and destroyed much of the island as well. In 1980 Mount St. Helens produced a new type of eruption and scythed down a majestic forest. Alwyn Scarth explores these and other eruptions, reconstructing the physical experience of the disaster, its origins, explosion, and aftermath, and interpreting (in many cases for the first time in English) eyewitness accounts that bring their own vividness to the unfolding drama. The accounts tell of fear, panic, miscalculation, and inefficiency as well as emergency organization, self-sacrifice, religious fervor, and heroism, revealing how each affected population handled--or mishandled--its crisis. Scarth's riveting survey shows that technology and volcanic surveillance have made enormous strides during the present century. But volcanoes remain indomitable: no one has yet learned how an eruption can be stopped.

  • Drawn to Italian Drawings: The Goldman Collection

    This lovely book features exquisite drawings from the Renaissance and Baroque periods, including works by Guercino, Parmigianino, Raphael, and other Italian masters. These 130 working drawings, preparatory sketches, and finished compositions offer insights into the varied approaches to drawing, the artists' developing styles, and the different regional approaches to the medium. Highlighting works from the distinguished collection of Jean and Steven Goldman, the volume enables the reader to study the drawings of 16th- and 17th-century artists in dialogue with one another. With compelling images, many never before published, executed in a variety of media, exciting new attributions, and important analyses, this book is essential for anyone who admires the bravura and beauty of Old Master drawings.

  • Jews and Words

    Why are words so important to Jews? Novelist Amos Oz and historian Fania Oz-Salzberger roam the gamut of Jewish history to explain the integral relationship of Jews and words. Through a blend of storytelling and scholarship, conversation and argument, father and daughter tell the tales behind Judaism's most enduring names, adages, disputes, texts, and quips. These words, they argue, comprise the chain connecting Abraham with the Jews of every subsequent generation. Framing the discussion within such topics as continuity, women, timelessness, and individualism, Oz and Oz-Salzberger deftly engage Jewish personalities across the ages, from the unnamed, possibly-female author of the "Song of Songs" through obscure Talmudists to contemporary writers. They suggest that Jewish continuity, even Jewish uniqueness, depends not on central places, monuments, heroic personalities, or rituals, but rather on written words and an ongoing conversation between the generations. Full of learning, lyricism, and humour, "Jews and Words" offers an extraordinary tour of the words at the heart of Jewish culture and extends a hand to the reader, any reader, to join the dialogue.

  • Mark Bradford

    Mark Bradford is best known for dazzling large-scale abstract collages that incisively examine class, race and the gender-based economies that structure urban society in the United States. A recipient of a 2009 MacArthur Foundation Award (nicknamed the 'genius grants'), Bradford gathers found and salvaged materials from the area surrounding his studio in Leimert Park, L.A., engaging in an intricate artistic process that involves both creation and destruction. His complex, fractured works address pressing political issues and the media's influence on contemporary society while cataloguing cultural change and the artist's personal responses to societal conditions. The first major book on this leading African American artist, 'Mark Bradford: You're Nobody (Til Somebody Kills You)' features essays by distinguished authors who investigate how Bradford deftly straddles the line between social critique and formal innovation, playing the two against one another to produce works of seduction and analysis. Topics include Bradford's debt to abstract expressionism, his relationship to the largely unknown history of twentieth-century abstraction by African American artists, his work as a public artist and his interest in midcentury European collage and decollage practices.

  • The Repeating Image - Multiples in French Painting from David to Matisse

    An authoritative and elegant study of the theme of repetition in early modern painting

    Today serial imagery dominates all forms of visual media, from advertising to conceptual sculpture. In this innovative project, the authors show that the phenomenon of repetition appears as a radical element in early modern painting, long before its embrace by 20th-century high modernism. In works by Ingres, Delaroche, Gerome, Corot, Millet, Monet, Cezanne, Degas, and Matisse, the reader can compare closely related versions of some of the most familiar imagery of the 19th and early 20th centuries. By making multiples of closely related subject matter in their paintings, the authors argue, these painters challenged an aesthetic based on the notion of an inimitable, unique masterpiece. Through beautiful illustrations and essays by leading scholars, this book ultimately shows how the 19th-century invention of photography and film--with their intrinsic attributes of repetition--did not diminish the traditional medium of painting but rather propelled it in new directions.

  • Richard I

    Neither a feckless knight-errant nor a king who neglected his kingdom, Richard I was in reality a masterful and businesslike ruler. In this wholly rewritten version of a classic account of the reign of Richard The Lionheart, John Gillingham scrutinizes the reasons for the King's fluctuating reputation over successive centuries and provides a convincing new interpretation of the significance of the reign. This edition includes a complete annotation and expanded bibliography.

  • Household Gods - The British and their Possessions

    At what point did the British develop their mania for interiors, wallpaper, furniture, and decoration? Why have the middle classes developed so passionate an attachment to the contents of their homes? This absorbing book offers surprising answers to these questions, uncovering the roots of today's consumer society and investigating the forces that shape consumer desires. Richly illustrated, 'Household Gods' chronicles a hundred years of British interiors, focusing on class, choice, shopping, and possessions. Exploring a wealth of unusual records and archives, Deborah Cohen locates the source of modern consumerism and materialism in early nineteenth-century religious fervor. Over the course of the Victorian era, consumerism shed the taint of sin to become the pre-eminent means of expressing individuality. The book ranges from musty antique shops to luxurious emporia, from suburban semi-detached houses to elegant city villas, from husbands fretting about mantelpieces to women appropriating home decoration as a feminist cause. It uncovers a society of consumers whose identities have become entwined with the things they put in their houses.

  • Vienna Circa 1780 - An Imperial Silver Service Rediscovered

    The Sachsen-Teschen Silver Service was made for Duke Albert Casimir (1738-1822) and his consort, Archduchess Maria Christina of Austria (1742-1798), sister of Queen Marie-Antoinette and daughter of Empress Maria Theresa. The Imperial court goldsmith Ignaz Josef Wurth created a spectacular table setting that comprises of hundreds of items, including several wine coolers, tureens, cloches, sauceboats, candelabra, candlesticks - most with fanciful sculptural decorations - in addition to twenty-four dozen silver plates and porcelain-mounted cutlery as well as other serving objects. The ensemble represents the splendour of princely dining during the ancient regime at its best. The book places this unknown imperial silver service, an embodiment of Viennese neo-classicism and a rare survivor not melted down for its precious metal, in the context of contemporary silver from other European cities and introduces Vienna as a major centre of neoclassical goldsmithing.

  • Three Thousand Years of Chinese Painting

    From Neolithic painted petroglyphs, early paintings on silk, and landscapes by twelfth-century literati to the traditional handscrolls being produced today, Chinese painting has always had the power to enthrall. This magnificent book, written by a team of eminent international scholars, is the first to recount the history of Chinese painting over a span of some three thousand years. Drawing on museum collections, archives, and archaeological sites in China--including many resources never before available to Western scholars--as well as on collections in other countries, the authors present and analyze the very best examples of Chinese painting: more than 300 of them are reproduced here in color. Both accessible to the general reader and revelatory for the scholar, the book provides the most up-to-date and detailed history of China's pictorial art available today.

    In this book the authors rewrite the history of Chinese art wherever it is found--in caves, temples, or museum collections. They begin by grounding the Western reader in Chinese traditions and practices, showing in essence how to look at a Chinese painting. They then shed light on such topics as the development of classical and narrative painting, the origins of the literati tradition, the flowering of landscape painting, and the ways the traditions of Chinese painting have been carried into the present day. The book, which concludes with a glossary of techniques and terms and a list of artists by dynasty, is an essential resource for all lovers of, or newcomers to, Chinese painting.

    Three Thousand Years of Chinese Painting is the inaugural volume in a new series, The Culture & Civilization of China, a joint publishing venture of Yale University Press and the American Council of Learned Societies with the China International Publishing Group in Beijing. The undertaking will ultimately result in the publication of more than seventy-five volumes on the visual arts, classical literature, language, and philosophy, as well as several comprehensive reference volumes.

  • Apethorpe - The Story of an English Country House

    This beautiful publication narrates the romantic biography of an architecturally significant country residence and its rescue from decline. Dating from the mid-15th century, Apethorpe in Northamptonshire was home to a succession of leading courtiers and politicians. At the command of King James I, the house was refurbished with a richly decorated state apartment. The suite, with its series of rare plaster ceilings and carved chimneypieces, unquestionably ranks as one of the finest--and least known--in Britain. In 2004, English Heritage rescued the house from ruin and has since restored it to much of its glory.

    This book places Apethorpe in its wider historical and architectural context, comparing it with other Tudor and Jacobean houses. It sheds new light on the furnishing, decoration, and circulation patterns of state suites in country homes. Written by architectural and archeological experts from Historic England, this monograph, the first on Apethorpe, is illustrated with new and historical photographs, paintings, maps, engravings, and specially commissioned interpretive drawings that reveal how the house looked at key moments in its history.

  • Machu Picchu - Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas

    Situated high in the Peruvian Andes, the fifteenth-century Inca palace complex at Machu Picchu is one of the most spectacular archaeological sites in the world. In this beautifully illustrated book, leading American and Peruvian scholars provide an unprecedented overview of the site, its place within the Inca empire, the mysteries surrounding its establishment and abandonment, and the discoveries made there since the excavations by archaeologist Hiram Bingham III in the early twentieth century.

    Drawing upon the most recent scientific findings, the authors vividly describe the royal estate in the cloud forest where the Inca emperor and his guests went to escape the pressures of the capital. In addition to Bingham's exciting account of his first expedition in 1911, the book includes new and archival photographs of the site as well as color illustrations and explanations of some 120 gold, silver, ceramic, bone, and textile works recovered at Machu Picchu.

  • The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes 2e

    Now in its second edition, this landmark book provides an intellectual history of the British working classes from the preindustrial era to the twentieth century. Drawing on workers' memoirs, social surveys, library registers, and more, Jonathan Rose discovers which books people read, how they educated themselves, and what they knew. A new preface uncovers the author's journey into labour history, and its rewarding link to intellectual history.

  • Sheila Hicks 50 Years

    Sheila Hicks (born 1934) is a pioneering artist noted for objects and public commissions whose structures are built of colour and fibre. This volume accompanies the first major retrospective of Hickss work; it documents the remarkable versatility and dramatically divergent scale of her textiles as well as her distinctive use, and surprising range, of materials. Hicks deliberately and provocatively engages what are often considered mutually exclusive domains, rethinking and pushing the limits of generally accepted contexts, conditions, and frameworks. These include distinct objects and temporal, performative actions; studio works and commissions for public buildings; and textiles made in artisanal workshops as well as for industrial production in places as different as Chile, France, Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, Sweden, and the United States. Three essays analyze the progression of Hickss art and technique and her many modes of working. Among other topics, they examine the artists relationship to the expanded fields of the new sculpture and the new tapestry beginning in the 1960s, the reclamation of craft as subject and technique for artists in many media, the integrated influences of international cultures, and the aesthetic, pedagogical, conceptual, and historical framework from which Hickss work has developed. This publication reveals the full extent of Hickss work, from exquisite miniature weavings to major sculptural pieces to such large-scale commissions as The Four Seasons of Fuji. Exquisitely designed and lavishly illustrated, this book demonstrates that Hickss pioneering work with textiles has embraced yet reinvented tradition, successfully navigating the terrain between art, design, and architecture.

  • 95 Theses on Politics, Culture and Method

    When Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses on the church door at Wittenberg, he offered a challenge to the dominant establishment of which he was a member. In this provocative book, political scientist Anne Norton proposes 95 theses that launch a brilliant, witty polemic against the reigning orthodoxies in her own field. Rejecting the antiquated and stultifying models encountered in textbooks and in courses on methodology and championed by the self-appointed gatekeepers of a narrow and parochial political science, Norton opens the gates to new practices, new principles, new questions, more methods, and more demanding ethical and scientific criteria. Practice, she argues, has outstripped old models and conventional standards. Drawing on the most daring and rigorous work in structuralism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism, cultural studies, literary theory, institutional analysis, and the philosophy of science, she offers practical advice for students of politics, culture, and method.

  • French Opera - A Short History

    French opera is second only to Italian opera in the length, breadth and diversity of its history. Yet most people, if asked to come up with titles, could mention only a handful of titles - Carmen, Faust, Pelleas et Melisande, Samson et Dalila - a small list for an operatic tradition that began in the seventeenth century and is still very much alive. This book provides a full, single-volume account of opera in France from its origins to the present day. Vincent Giroud looks at the leading composers, from Lully to Messiaen and beyond; at the development of French operatic form and style; at performance, performers, and audience; and at the impact of French opera beyond France's borders. Lovers of opera will find this an ideal companion to their appreciation of the form.

  • Outside In - Chinese American Contemporary Art

    The art world is currently enthralled with contemporary Chinese art. This thoughtful book argues, however, that American audiences have been exposed only to a narrow range of what is available - with the majority of exposure having been given to avant-garde, experimental, or politically charged art. 'Outside In' discusses contemporary Chinese art in a far wider range of styles and subject matter and substantially expands on our understanding of this work. The book features six artists - Arnold Chang, Michael Cherney, Zhi Lin, Liu Dan, Vanessa Tran, and Zhang Hongtu - all of whom are American citizens yet are widely diverse in age and experience as well as geographical and ethnic origins. In addition to extensive personal interviews and artists' statements, there are essays that challenge the categorization of art into such focused genres as 'Chinese', 'contemporary', and 'American', and reexamine the factors that shape the development of Chinese art in America.

  • Henry VI

    In this widely acclaimed biography, Bertram Wolffe challenges the traditional view of Henry VI as an unworldly, innocent, and saintly monarch and offers instead a finely drawn but critical portrait of an ineffectual ruler. Drawing on widespread contemporary evidence, Wolffe describes the failures of Henry's long reign from 1422 to 1471, which included the collapse of justice, the loss of the French territories, and the final disintegration of his government. He argues that the posthumous cult of Henry was promoted by Henry VII as a way of excusing his uncle's political failures while enhancing the image of the dynasty. This edition includes a new foreword by John Watts that discusses the book and its place in the evolving literature.

    Reviews of the earlier edition:
    "A brilliant biography that brings us as near as we are ever likely to come to this elusive personality." --Sunday Times (London)
    "A powerful, compulsively readable portrait." --Observer
    "Much learning, skillfully deployed as here, evokes pleasure as well as admiration." --R.L. Storey, Times Literary Supplement

  • The Annotated Waste Land with Eliot's Contemporary Prose

    The definitive edition of the most influential poem of the twentieth century

    One of the twentieth century's most powerful--and controversial--works, The Waste Land waspublished in the desolate wake of the First World War. This definitive edition of T. S. Eliot's masterpiece presents a new and authoritative version of the poem, along with all the essays Eliot wrote as he was composing The Waste Land, seven of them never before published in book form. The volume is enriched with period photographs and a London map of locations mentioned in the poem.
    Featured in the book are Lawrence Rainey's groundbreaking account of how The Waste Land cameto be composed; a history of the reactions of admirers and critics; and full annotations to the poem and Eliot's essays. The edition transforms our understanding of one of the greatest modernist writers and the magnificent poem that became a landmark in literary history.

  • Transcendentalist Ministers - Church Reform in the New England Renaissance

    This prize-winning book by a distinguished historian of American religion examines the efforts of the Transcendentalists of the New England Renaissance to reform the Unitarian Church and concludes that the Transcendentalists made significant contributions to American Protestant thought.

  • How the Earthquake Bird Got It′s Name and Other Tales of an Unbalanced Nature

    In the tradition of Stephen Jay Gould, H. H. Shugart entertains and enlightens with parables from the amazing world of birds and mammals

    Although people have been altering earth's landscapes to some extent for tens of thousands of years, humankind today is causing massive changes to the planet. Such widespread environmental change is accompanied by accelerating rates of species extinction. In this book, noted ecologist H. H. Shugart presents important ecological concepts through entertaining animal parables. He tells the stories of particular birds and mammals--the packrat, ivory-billed woodpecker, penguin, dingo, European rabbit, and others--and what their fates reveal about the interactions between environmental change and the extinctions or explosions of species populations. Change is the root of many planetary problems, but it is also an intrinsic feature of our living planet. Shugart explores past environmental change, discusses the non-existence of a "balance of Nature," and documents how human alterations have affected plants, soils, and animals. He looks with hope toward a future in which thoughtful people learn--and use--ecological science to protect the landscapes upon which terrestrial creatures depend.

  • The American Matisse - The Dealer, His Artists, His Collection

    In a career spanning over six decades, the New York art dealer Pierre Matisse (1900-1989) contributed substantially to the advancement of modern art. At his eponymous gallery on East Fifty-Seventh Street, he showed several now legendary artists for the first time outside Europe. The collection - paintings, sculpture, and drawings by Balthus, Bonnard, Chagall, Derain, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Magritte, Miro, and the dealer's own father, Henri Matisse, among others - was donated to The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2004 by the foundation established by his widow. These extraordinary artworks are presented with informative entries addressing the circumstances of each work's creation and the dealer's relationship to the artist. In the introduction, the story of Pierre Matisse's early struggles in New York is told for the first time and illustrated with previously unpublished archival photographs.

  • King Hussein of Jordan: A Political Life

    A towering figure in the history of Jordan, King Hussein reigned for nearly half a century, from his grandfather's assassination in 1953 to his own death in 1999. In this fascinating biography, Nigel Ashton recounts the eventful life of the king who not only survived but flourished amidst crisis after crisis as ruler of a poor desert nation surrounded by powerful and hostile neighbours. Hussein skillfully navigated complicated relationships with the British, his fellow Arab leaders, the new bordering state of Israel, masses of dispossessed Palestinians within his kingdom, every U.S. president from Eisenhower to Clinton, and every British prime minister from Churchill to Blair. This book for the first time illuminates the private man, his key relationships, and his achievements and disappointments as a central player in Middle Eastern politics.Ashton has had unique access to King Hussein's private papers, including his secret correspondence with U.S., British, and Israeli leaders, and he has also conducted numerous interviews with members of Hussein's circle and immediate family. The resulting book brings new depth to our understanding of the popular and canny king while also providing new information about the wars of 1967 and 1973, President Reagan's role in the Iran-Contra affair, the evolution of the Middle East peace process, and many other aspects of the relations among Jordan and the other Arab states.

  • A Man and His Presidents: The Political Odyssey of William F. Buckley Jr.

    A new understanding of the man who changed the face of American politics

    William F. Buckley Jr. is widely regarded as the most influential American conservative writer, activist, and organizer in the postwar era. In this nuanced biography, Alvin Felzenberg sheds light on little-known aspects of Buckley's career, including his role as back-channel adviser to policy makers, his intimate friendship with both Ronald and Nancy Reagan, his changing views on civil rights, and his break with George W. Bush over the Iraq War.

    Felzenberg demonstrates how Buckley conveyed his message across multiple platforms and drew upon his vast network of contacts, his personal charm, his extraordinary wit, and his celebrity status to move the center of political gravity in the United States closer to his point of view. Including many rarely seen photographs, this account of one of the most compelling personalities of American politics will appeal to conservatives, liberals, and even the apolitical.

  • Tapestry in the Baroque - New Aspects of Production and Patronage

    The exhibition "Tapestry in the Baroque: Threads of Splendor," which opened at the Metropolitan Museum in 2007, was the occasion for a symposium at which renowned tapestry scholars presented results of some of their important, highly detailed research. This volume publishes the papers in well-illustrated articles.

    The introductory article tours the exhibition, setting out its organization over the course of the period 1590 through the early 1700s, which saw the scattering of Flemish weavers around Europe during years of religious turmoil and the resulting development of the tapestry industry in such centers as Delft, Helsingor, Munich, London (Mortlake), Paris, and Rome, and then the industry's revival in Brussels. In their articles, the contributors concentrate on specific individuals in tapestry design, production, and collecting. They distill the results of laborious digging through family and crown inventories, parish records, notarial accounts, and other archival resources, as well as close examination of historical reports, to put forward new assessments of the accomplishments of tapestry designers and producers and a better understanding of the reasons wealthy patrons collected and displayed tapestries and presented them as gifts.

    A number of the articles include appendixes with transcriptions of archival material.

  • The Long Parliment Of Charles II

    Charles II's first and most important parliament sat for eighteen years without a general election, earning itself the sobriquet "Long." In 1661 this parliament began in eager compliance with the new king. Gradually disillusioned by Charles's maneuvers, however, its members came to demand more control of the economy, religion, and foreign policy, starting a struggle that led to the Exclusion crisis. This lively book is the first full study of this Restoration Parliament.

    Using parliamentary diaries, newsletters, memoirs, letters from members of parliament, scofflaw pamphlets, and the king's own speeches, Annabel Patterson describes this second Long Parliament in an innovative and challenging way, stressing that how its records were kept and circulated is an important part of the story. Because the parliamentary debates of this age were jealously guarded from public knowledge, unofficial sources of information flourished. Often these are more candid or colorful than official records. Eighteenth-century historians, especially if Whiggish, recycled many of them for posterity. The book, therefore, not only recovers a crucial period of parliamentary history, one that helps to explain the Glorious Revolution, it also opens a discussion about historiographical method.

  • Gifts from The Ancestors - Ancient Ivories of Bering Strait

    The appearance during the first millennium A.D. of small, exquisitely carved artefacts of walrus ivory in the Bering Strait region marks the beginning of an extraordinary florescence in the art and culture of North America. The discovery in the 1930s and 1940s of world-class carvings of animals, mythical beasts, shape-shifting creatures, masks and human figurines astounded scholars and excited collectors. Nevertheless, the extraordinary objects that belong to this fascinating, sometimes frightening, world of hunting-related art remain largely unknown. 'Gifts from the Ancestors' examines ancient ivories from the coast of Bering Strait, western Alaska, and the islands in between - illuminating their sophisticated formal aesthetic, cultural complexity, and individual histories. Many of the pieces discussed are from recent Russian excavations and are presented here for the first time in English; others are from private collections not usually open to the public. The essays, written by an international group of scholars, adopt a refreshing interdisciplinary approach that gives voice to the various competing, and now sometimes cooperating, stakeholders, including Native groups, museums, archaeologists, art historians, art dealers, and private collectors.

  • Sleeping Beauty A Legend in Progress

    In 1999 the Maryinsky (formerly Kirov) Ballet and Theater in St. Petersburg re-created its 1890 production of Sleeping Beauty. The revival showed the classic work in its original sets and costumes and restored pantomime and choreography that had been eliminated over the past century. Nevertheless, the work proved unexpectedly controversial, with many Russian dance professionals and historians denouncing it. In order to understand how a historically informed performance could be ridiculed by those responsible for writing the history of Russian and Soviet ballet, Tim Scholl discusses the tradition, ideology, and popular legend that have shaped the development of Sleeping Beauty. In the process he provides a history of Russian and Soviet ballet during the twentieth century.
    A fascinating slice of cultural history, the book will appeal not only to dance historians but also to those interested in the arts and cultural policies of the Soviet and post-Soviet periods.

  • Delia′s Tears - Race, Science and Photography in Nineteenth-Century America

    In 1850 seven South Carolina slaves were photographed at the request of the famous naturalist Louis Agassiz to provide evidence of the supposed biological inferiority of Africans. Lost for more than a century, the photographs were rediscovered in the attic of Harvard's Peabody Museum in 1976. In the first narrative history of these images, Molly Rogers tells the story of the photographs, the people they depict, and the men who made and used them. Weaving together the histories of race, science, and photography in nineteenth-century America, Rogers explores the invention and uses of photography, the scientific theories the images were intended to support and how these related to the race politics of the time, the meanings that may have been found in the photographs, and the possible reasons why they were 'lost' for a century or more. Each image is accompanied by a brief fictional vignette about the subject's life, as imagined by Rogers. These portraits bring the seven subjects to life, adding a fascinating human dimension to the historical material.

  • Marsden Hartley and the West - The Search for an American Modernism

    A revelatory look at Hartley's New Mexico landscapes and the darker side of postwar American modernism

    Considered to be among the greatest early American modernists, the painter Marsden Hartley (1877-1943) traveled the United States and Europe in his search for a distinctive American aesthetic. His stay in New Mexico resulted in an extraordinary series of landscape paintings--created in New Mexico, New York, and Europe between 1918 and 1924--that show an evolution in style and thinking that is important for understanding both Hartley's oeuvre and American modernism in the postwar years. Marsden Hartley and the West examines this pivotal stage of the painter's career, drawing upon his writings and providing illustrations of rarely seen and previously unpublished works. The author considers Hartley's involvement with the Stieglitz circle and its "soil-and-spirit" philosophy, the Taos art colony, New York Dada, and the impact of historical events such as World War I. Within this setting she analyzes the pastels and oil paintings that suggest Hartley's increasingly ambivalent response to the land. Beginning with optimistic, naturalistic views, the New Mexico works grew progressively darker and more tumultuous, increasingly reflecting a sense of loss brought on by war. The paintings become a site where the landscapes of memory, self, and nation merge, while reflecting broader modernist debates about "American-ness" and a usable past.

  • The Duel: The Eighty-Day Struggle Between Churchill and Hitler

    This is a day-by-day account of the eighty-day struggle in 1940 between Hitler--poised on the edge of absolute victory--and Churchill--threatened by imminent invasion and defeat--on the eve of the second World War.

    "A masterful book--masterful in its portrayal of its protagonists, masterful in its overall understanding of the death-struggle in which they engaged, masterful, above all, in its vivid, suspenseful chronicling of the most momentous eighty days in the history of this century." --Geoffrey Ward

    "This is a marvelous book. John Lukacs has lucid, unsentimental insight into the mind and character of both Churchill and Hitler." --Conor Cruise O'Brien

    "A wonderful story wonderfully told." --George F. Will

    "It is salutary to be reminded in this powerful study how close Hitler came to winning in 1940. . . . An impressive study . . . [written] with elegance and panache." --Peter Stansky, New York Times

    "A master of narrative history on a par with Barbara Tuchman and Garrett Mattingly." --Kirkus Reviews

  • Collected Writings on Velazquez

    In this stimulating book, a leading authority on the Spanish master Diego Velazquez discusses this enigmatic artist and explores the mysteries presented by his paintings.

    The essays collected here, written over the course of Jonathan Brown's distinguished career, include some which are published in English for the first time and one which has never before been published. Two themes unite them. The first concerns the changing relationship between Velazquez and his patron Philip IV, which provides a framework for Brown to interpret the painter's career. The centerpiece of this relationship is Velaquez's masterpiece, Las Meninas, and this painting is the subject of two essays. The second theme is the problem of attributions and the related issue of Velazquez's innovative technique. Since Velazquez was not a prolific painter, questions of authenticity become increasingly contentious. Brown considers this matter in its widest dimensions and participates in the debate about individual attributions.

  • Orsanmichele and the History and Preservation of the Civic Monument

    This far-ranging collection of essays--the first book-length scholarly exploration of Orsanmichele since 1996--marks the conclusion of a decades-long campaign to restore the magnificent medieval church and its art, most notably Orsanmichele's celebrated niche sculptures. Originally commissioned by Florence's trade guilds acting in competition with one another, the sculptures represent work by some of the greatest artists of the day--including Donatello, Filippo Brunelleschi, Andrea Pisano, Nanni di Banco, Lorenzo Ghiberti, and Andrea del Verrocchio--and are among the finest examples of Renaissance art in the world.

    In twenty-two original essays by leading scholars working across disciplines, Orsanmichele and the History and Preservation of the Civic Monument makes important new information about the history and restoration of the church available for the first time, and examines the monument in its broadest context as a civic and religious center from the Middle Ages to the present day, revealing the historic building's evolving role as repository of history and living institution.

  • Rav Kook - Everthing is Rising

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, the life and thought of a forceful figure in Israel's religious and political life

    Rav Abraham Isaac Kook (1865-1935) was one of the most influential--and controversial--rabbis of the twentieth century. A visionary writer and outstanding rabbinic leader, Kook was a philosopher, mystic, poet, jurist, communal leader, and veritable saint. The first chief rabbi of Jewish Palestine and the founding theologian of religious Zionism, he struggled to understand and shape his revolutionary times. His life and writings resonate with the defining tensions of Jewish life and thought.

    A powerfully original thinker, Rav Kook combined strict traditionalism and an embrace of modernity, Orthodoxy and tolerance, piety and audacity, scholasticism and ecstasy, and passionate nationalism with profound universalism. Though little known in the English-speaking world, his life and teachings are essential to understanding current Israeli politics, contemporary Jewish spirituality, and modern Jewish thought. This biography, the first in English in more than half a century, offers a rich and insightful portrait of the man and his complex legacy. Yehudah Mirsky clears away widespread misunderstandings of Kook's ideas and provides fresh insights into his personality and worldview. Mirsky demonstrates how Kook's richly erudite, dazzlingly poetic writings convey a breathtaking vision in which "the old will become new, and the new will become holy."

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • Buckminster Fuller: Starting with the Universe

    From his geodesic dome to books popularizing the terms 'spaceship earth' and 'synergetics', the life mission of R. Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) was to create living environments that minimized the consumption of the earth's resources while maximizing interconnections with global systems of information and transportation. Never before has his extraordinary body of work been so fully explored as in this book, which focuses on Fuller's wide-ranging and sometimes controversial role within the worlds of art, architecture, and utopian thought. The book chronicles Fuller's profound, often prophetic contributions, including his environmentally sensitive building designs. The essays illuminate the underappreciated thematic interactions of many sculptors, painters, musicians, and architects with this self-described 'comprehensive anticipatory design scientist', including contemporary artists wrestling with Fuller's legacy today. Also included is an illustrated contextual chronology. Reproductions of original drawings and models - including those for Fuller's 4D house, Wichita House, the Montreal Expo dome, and the sole extant Dymaxion car - plus a reprinted 1966 New Yorker profile on Fuller by Calvin Tomkins, complete the fascinating tribute.

  • Jeremiah 21-36

    This second book of the three-volume Anchor Bible Commentary offers an astute translation and commentary on the middle sixteen chapters of Jeremiah. Important themes in the present volume include injustice within Judah's royal house, sexual immorality among the clergy, and true versus false prophecy. Yet the prophet who thundered Yahweh's judgment was also the one who gave the remnant people--in oracle and in symbolic action--a promise and a hope, expressed climactically in a new and eternal covenant for future days. Here too is the only report in the Bible of an accredited scribe writing up a scroll of oracles for public reading at the Temple.

    This magisterial work of scholarship is sure to be essential to any biblical studies curriculum. Jeremiah 21-36 draws on the best biblical scholarship to further our understanding of this preeminent prophet and his message to the world.

  • The Grid & the Village

    In January 1998 a massive ice storm descended on New York, New England, and eastern Canada. It crushed power grids from the Great Lakes to the North Atlantic, forcing thousands of people into public shelters and leaving millions of others in their homes without electricity. In this riveting book Stephen Doheny-Farina presents an insider's account of these events, describing the destruction of the electric network in his own village and the emergence of the face-to-face interactions that took its place. His stories examine the impact of electronic communications on community, illuminating the relationship between electronic and human connections and between networks and neighborhoods, and exploring why and how media portrayals of disasters can distort authentic experience.

    Doheny-Farina begins by discussing the disaster and tracing the origins of the storm. He then goes back two hundred years to tell how this particular electric grid was built, showing us the sacrifices people made to create the grids that (usually) connect us to one another. Today's power grid, says Doheny-Farina, has become more vulnerable than we realize, as demand begins to outstrip capacity in urban centers around the nation. His book reminds us what those grids mean--both positively and negatively--to our electronically saturated lives.

  • Alvar Aalto - Architecture, Modernity and Geopolitics

    Perhaps no other great modern architect has been linked to a native country as closely as Alvar Aalto. Critics have argued that the essence of Finland flows, as if naturally, into his quasi-organic forms, ranging from such buildings as the Baker House in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to iconic 20th-century designs, including his Savoy vase and bent-plywood stacking stools. What did Aalto himself say about the importance of nationalism and geography in his work and in architecture generally? With an unprecedented focus on the architect's own writings, library, and critical reception, Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen proposes a dramatically different interpretation of Aalto's oeuvre, revealing it as a deeply thoughtful response to his intellectual and cultural milieu - especially to Finland's dynamic political circumstances following independence from Russia in 1917. Pelkonen also considers the geographic and geopolitical narratives found in his writings. These include ideas about national style and national cultural revival, and about how architecture can foster cosmopolitanism, internationalism and regionalism. Expanding the canonical reading of Aalto, this work promises to influence future inquiries on Aalto for generations to come.

  • Raphael at the Metropolitan: The Colonna Altarpiece

    The Renaissance master Raphael (1483-1520) painted the Colonna altarpiece circa 1504-05 for a convent in Perugia. It was subsequently owned by Queen Christina of Sweden, the duc d'Orleans of France, and the Colonna family in Rome. In 1901, J. Pierpont Morgan acquired the altarpiece, which was still in a private collection, paying the phenomenal sum of two million francs. Morgan's son bequeathed the painting to the Metropolitan Museum in 1916, and it remains one of the great treasures of the collection.
    This catalogue explores the altarpiece's commission in the context of Raphael's career. Its fascinating history, new technical findings, and a reconstruction of the original altarpiece with its long-separated predella panels are featured. Raphael's preparatory drawings and selected works by such mentors as Perugino, Pinturicchio, and Fra Bartolommeo are illustrated and supplement this intriguing history, which unfolded over the course of four centuries.

  • The Waters of Rome - Aqueducts, Fountains and the Birth of the Baroque City

    In this pioneering study of the water infrastructure of Renaissance Rome, urban historian Katherine Rinne offers a new understanding of how technological and scientific developments in aqueduct and fountain architecture helped turn a medieval backwater into the preeminent city of early modern Europe. Supported by the authors extensive topographical research, this book presents a unified vision of the city that links improvements to public and private water systems with political, religious, and social change. Between 1560 and 1630, in a spectacular burst of urban renewal, Romes religious and civil authorities sponsored the construction of aqueducts, private and public fountains for drinking, washing, and industry, and the magnificent ceremonial fountains that are Romes glory. Tying together the technological, sociopolitical, and artistic questions that faced the designers during an age of turmoil in which the Catholic Church found its authority threatened and the infrastructure of the city was in a state of decay, Rinne shows how these public works projects transformed Rome in a successful marriage of innovative engineering and strategic urban planning.

  • Arguing About War

    A provocative discussion of recent wars and the issues that surround them, written by a preeminent political theorist
    Michael Walzer is one of the world's most eminent philosophers on the subject of war and ethics. Now, for the first time since his classic Just and Unjust Wars was published almost three decades ago, this volume brings together his most provocative arguments about contemporary military conflicts and the ethical issues they raise.
    The essays in the book are divided into three sections. The first deals with issues such as humanitarian intervention, emergency ethics, and terrorism. The second consists of Walzer's responses to particular wars, including the first Gulf War, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. And the third presents an essay in which Walzer imagines a future in which war might play a less significant part in our lives. In his introduction, Walzer reveals how his thinking has changed over time.
    Written during a period of intense debate over the proper use of armed force, this book gets to the heart of difficult problems and argues persuasively for a moral perspective on war.

  • Poiret.

    In the annals of fashion history, French couturier Paul Poiret (1879--1944) is known for liberating women from corsets and introducing pantaloons into their wardrobes. However, it is Poiret's remarkable innovations in the cut and construction of clothing, made all the more remarkable by the fact that he could not sew, that secures his legacy. This essential book is the first to explore Poiret's radical modernity from a number of perspectives. Essays by renowned scholars describe the historical context of his work; its relation to the dominant artistic discourses of the early 20th century; his muse, Denise Poiret, and her influence on his work; and his role in the paradigmatic shift to a new ideal of feminine beauty. Poiret's entrepreneurship, his creation of an atelier to extend his influence beyond fashion to the art de vivre, and his relationship to the workshops of the Wiener Werkstatte are also discussed. Poiret's innovative creations are represented by colorful pochoirs (stencils), personal photographs from the Poiret family archives, and newly commissioned photographs of Poiret's masterworks.

  • Socrates Sculpture Park

    Socrates Sculpture Park is one of the most acclaimed public art spaces in the country. The Park opened in 1986 and has been an outdoor studio to over 500 artists, a venue presenting more than 40 exhibitions of large-scale sculpture, and a vital park attracting a diverse audience to Long Island City's East River waterfront. This handsome book is published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Socrates Sculpture Park, and it is the first major publication on this unique outdoor museum.
    Sculptor Mark di Suvero founded the Park with the assistance of fellow artists, community members, and city officials who transformed an abandoned lot into an award-winning urban renewal project. The history, spirit, and nature of this collaborative enterprise is presented through photographs and essays that reveal the beauty, energy, and import of this successful public art space.

  • The Works Of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 26 - Catalogues of Books

    This final volume in The Works of Jonathan Edwards publishes for the first time Edwards' "Catalogue," a notebook he kept of books of interest, especially titles he hoped to acquire, and entries from his "Account Book," a ledger in which he noted books loaned to family, parishioners, and fellow clergy. These two records, along with several shorter documents presented in the volume, illuminate Edwards' own mental universe while also providing a remarkable window into the wider intellectual and print cultures of the eighteenth-century British Atlantic. An extensive critical introduction places Edwards' book lists in the contexts that shaped his reading agenda, and the result is the most comprehensive treatment yet of his reading and of the fascinating peculiarities of his time and place.

  • Germaine De Stael and Benjamin Constant - A Dual Biography

    When they first met in 1794, shortly after the Reign of Terror, Germaine de Stael and Benjamin Constant were both in their twenties, both married, and both outsiders. She was already celebrated and a published writer, whereas he, though ambitious, was unknown. This compelling dual biography tells the extraordinary story of their union and disunion, set against a European background of momentous events and dramatic social and cultural change. Renee Winegarten offers new perspectives on each of the protagonists, revealing their rare qualities and their all-too-human failings as well as the complex nature of their debt to one another. Their passionate and productive relationship endured on and off for seventeen years. Winegarten traces their story largely through their own words in letters and autobiographical writings, and illuminates the deep intellectual and visceral bond they shared despite disparate personalities and gifts. Exploring their relationships with Napoleon and the Bourbons, their different responses to the momentous upheavals of postrevolutionary France, their support of individual liberty with order, and more, the book concludes with an appreciation of de Staels and Constants singular contributions to a new literature and to the history of liberty.

  • The Recording Angel - Explorations in Phonography (Expanded Edition)

    First published in 1987 and now considered a classic, The Recording Angel charts the ways in which the phonograph and its cousins have transformed our culture. In a new Afterword, Evan Eisenberg shows how digital technology, file trading, and other recent developments are accelerating--or reversing--these trends. Influential and provocative, The Recording Angel is required reading for anyone who cares about the effect recording has had--and will have--on our experience of music.

  • London 6 - Westminster

    This essential guide opens up the treasures of London's most alluring quarter. At its core are Westminster Abbey, Parliament, and the palatial Government buildings of Whitehall, together with the great band of Royal Parks stretching westward toward Kensington. It also includes London's West End (Covent Garden, Soho, Mayfair, and St. James's) and the less well-known Belgravia and Pimlico.

    For each area there is a detailed gazetteer and brief introduction. A general introduction provides a historical and artistic overview. Numerous maps and plans, over 100 new color photographs, full indexes, and an illustrated glossary help to make this book invaluable as both reference work and guide.

    This is the fifth of six Pevsner Architectural Guides volumes on London available in cloth.

  • The Unknown Battle of Midway - The Destruction of the American Torpedo Squadrons

    The Battle of Midway is considered the greatest U.S. naval victory, but behind the luster is the devastation of the American torpedo squadrons. Of the 51 planes sent to attack Japanese carriers only 7 returned, and of the 127 aircrew only 29 survived. Not a single torpedo hit its target.
    A story of avoidable mistakes and flawed planning, The Unknown Battle of Midway reveals the enormous failures that led to the destruction of four torpedo squadrons but were omitted from official naval reports: the planes that ran out of gas, the torpedoes that didn't work, the pilots who had never dropped torpedoes, and the breakdown of the attack plan. Alvin Kernan, who was present at the battle, has written a troubling but persuasive analysis of these and other little-publicized aspects of this great battle. The standard navy tactics for carrier warfare are revealed in tragic contrast to the actual conduct of the battle and the after-action reports of the ships and squadrons involved.

  • The Dynamics of Global Dominance - European Overseas Empires 1415-1980

    For centuries Europeans ruled vast portions of the world, as inhabitants of west European countries sailed to distant continents and took possession of territories whose societies and economies they set out to change. How and why did these farflung empires form, persist, and finally fall? David Abernethy addresses these questions in this magisterial survey of the rise and decline of European overseas empires.

    Abernethy identifies broad patterns across time and space, interweaving them with fascinating details of cross-cultural encounters. He argues that relatively autonomous profit-making, religious, and governmental institutions enabled west European countries to launch triple assaults on other societies. Indigenous people also played a role in their eventual subjugation by inviting Europeans to intervene in their power struggles. Abernethy finds that imperial decline was often the unanticipated result of wars among major powers. Postwar crises over colonies' unmet expectations empowered movements that eventually took territories as diverse as the thirteen British North American colonies, Spain's South American possessions, India, the Dutch East Indies, Vietnam, and the Gold Coast to independence.

    In advancing a theory of imperialism that includes European and non-European actors, and in analyzing economic, social, and cultural as well as political dimensions of empire, Abernethy helps account for Europe's long occupation of global center stage. He also sheds light on key features of today's postcolonial world and the legacies of empire, concluding with an insightful approach to the moral evaluation of colonialism.

  • One of Many - Immigration, The US and the World

    William Cecil, Lord Burghley (1520-1598) was Elizabeth I's closest adviser and, as this revealing and provocative biography shows, the driving force behind the Queen's reign for four decades. Cecil, the steadfast rock of Elizabeth's government, had a deep and personal impact on the development of the English state. A committed Protestant, he guided the domestic and foreign affairs of the nation with the confidence of his religious conviction. Believing himself to be the divinely-instigated protector of his monarch, he felt able to disobey her direct commands. He was uncompromising, obsessive, supremely self-assured - a cunning politician as well as a consummate servant. This comprehensive biography gives proper weight to Cecil's formative years, his subtle navigation of the reigns of Edward VI and Mary I, his lifelong enmity with Mary Queen of Scots, and his obsession with family dynasty. It also provides a fresh account of Elizabeth I and her reign, uncovering limitations and concerns about invasion, succession and conspiracy. Intimate, authoritative, and enormously readable, this book will redefine our understanding of the Elizabethan period.

  • The Bassoon - Yale Musical Instrument Series

    An authoritative account of the 500-year history of the bassoon, with new research findings and dozens of rare illustrations

    This welcome volume encompasses the entire history of the bassoon, from its origins five centuries ago to its place in twenty-first-century music. James Kopp draws on new archival research and many years' experience playing the instrument to provide an up-to-date and lively portrait of today's bassoon and its intriguing predecessors. He discusses the bassoon's makers, its players, its repertory, its myths, and its audiences, all in unprecedented detail.

    The bassoon was invented in Italy in response to the need for a bass-register double-reed woodwind suitable for processionals and marching. Composers were quick to exploit its agility and unique timbre. Later, during the reign of Louis XIV, the instrument underwent a major redesign, giving voice to its tenor register. In the early 1800s new scientific precepts propelled a wave of invention and design modifications. In the twentieth century, the multiplicity of competing bassoon designs narrowed to a German (or Heckel) type and a French type, the latter now nearly extinct. The author examines the acoustical consequences of these various redesigns. He also offers new coverage of the bassoon's social history, including its roles in the military and church and its global use during the European Colonial period. Separate historical chapters devoted to contrabassoons and smaller bassoons complete the volume.

  • Churchill′s Promised Land - Zionism and Statecraft

    A comprehensive examination of Churchill's complex political, diplomatic, and intellectual response to Zionism

    This book is the first to explore fully the role that Zionism played in the political thought of Winston Churchill. Michael Makovsky traces the development of Churchill's positions toward Zionism from the period leading up to the First World War through his final years as prime minister in the 1950s. Setting Churchill's attitudes toward Zionism within the context of his overall worldview as well as within the context of twentieth-century British diplomacy, Makovsky offers a unique contribution to our understanding of Churchill.

    Moving chronologically, the book looks at Churchill's career within the context of several major themes: his own worldview and political strategies, his understanding of British imperial interests, the moral impact of the Holocaust, his commitment to ideals of civilization, and his historical sentimentalism. While Churchill was largely sympathetic to the Jews and to the Zionist impulse, he was not without inconsistencies in his views and policies over the years. Makovsky's book illuminates key aspects of Middle Eastern history; Zionist history; and British political, imperial, and diplomatic history; and further helps us understand one of the pivotal figures of the twentieth century.

  • Performing Music in the Age of Recording

    Listeners have enjoyed classical music recordings for more than a century, yet important issues about recorded performances have been little explored. What is the relationship between performance and recording? How are modern audiences affected by the trends set in motion by the recording era? What is the impact of recordings on the lives of musicians? In this wide-ranging book, Robert Philip extends the scope of his earlier pioneering book, Early Recordings and Musical Style: Changing Tastes in Instrumental Performance 1900-1950. Philip here considers the interaction between music-making and recording throughout the entire twentieth century.
    The author compares the lives of musicians and audiences in the years before recordings with those of today. He examines such diverse and sometimes contentious topics as changing attitudes toward freedom of expression, the authority of recordings made by or approved by composers, the globalization of performing styles, and the rise of the period instrument movement. Philip concludes with a thought-provoking discussion of the future of classical music performance.

  • Matisse: Radical Invention 1913-1917

    The works that Henri Matisse (1869-1954) executed between late 1913 and 1917 are among his most demanding, experimental, and enigmatic. Often sharply composed, heavily reworked, and dominated by the colours black and gray, these compositions are rigorously abstracted and purged of nearly all descriptive detail. Although they have typically been treated as unrelated to one another, as aberrations within the artist's oeuvre, or as singular responses to Cubism or World War I, 'Matisse: Radical Invention, 1913-1917' reveals the deep connections among them and their critical role in an ambitious, cohesive project that took the act of creation itself as its main focus. This book represents the first sustained examination of Matisse's output from this important period, revealing fascinating information about his working method, experimental techniques, and compositional choices uncovered through extensive new historical, technical, and scientific research. The lavishly illustrated volume is published to accompany a major exhibition consisting of approximately 125 paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints. It features in-depth studies of individual works such as 'Bathers by a River' and 'The Moroccans', which Matisse himself counted as among the most pivotal of his career, and facilitates a greater understanding of the artist's innovative process and radical stylistic evolution.

  • Marcel Duchamp: Etant Donnes

    In his early thirties, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) convinced everyone that he had abandoned making art in favour of playing chess. But from 1946 to 1966, he was secretly at work in his studio on West 14th Street in New York City. There he produced his final masterpiece: 'Etant donnes: 1[degrees] la chute d'eau, 2[degrees] le gaz d'eclairage', comprised of a battered wood door through which one views a prone, nude female, holding aloft an antique gas lamp against a landscape of trees, waterfall, and sky. Unveiled as a permanent installation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in July 1969, the year after Duchamp's death, it startled the art world with its explicit eroticism and voyeurism, as well as its trompe l'oeil realism. Since its public debut, 'Etant donnes' has been recognized as one of the most important and enigmatic works of the 20th century. Published on the fortieth anniversary of 'Etant donnes' original installation and to accompany the first major exhibition on the artwork and its related studies, this richly illustrated book presents a wealth of new research and documents that draw upon previously unpublished works of art and materials. The catalogue also examines the critical and artistic reception of 'Etant donnes', as evidenced by the subsequent work of Les Levine, Hannah Wilke, Robert Gober, Marcel Dzama, Ray Johnson, and other artists who have engaged with Duchamp's provocative and challenging tableau-construction.

  • State Of The Axe - Guitar Masters in Photographs and Words

    In this appealing book, acclaimed photographer Ralph Gibson offers more than sixty intimate black-and-white portraits of guitar masters playing their instruments. Focusing his expert lens on musicians who have lent their unmistakable voices to virtually every musical genre--jazz, funk, rock, acoustic, blues, fusion, classical, and experimental--Gibson reveals in each photograph the intense relationship of the player with his beloved "axe." The musicians in turn offer individual meditations on the guitar and insights into the passion they share for it.

    State of the Axe features guitarists across several generations, from early jazz greats to hip modern rockers, as they play their widely varied guitars, including traditional six-strings, double necks, ten-strings, and fretless models. Gibson's images capture the enduring appeal of the instrument and the intense, often rapturous expressions of those who pick, strum, amp, bottleneck, and bow the axe. Fusing his own passions for photography and music, Gibson generates a rhythm of words and images that creates a compelling view of the "state of the axe" today.

    Among the featured artists:

    Adrian Belew

    Nels Cline

    Jim Hall

    Mary Halvorson

    Allan Holdsworth

    Bill Frisell

    John McGlaughlin

    Lou Reed

    John Scofield

    Mike Stern

    Andy Summers

    James Blood Ulmer

  • Max Neuhaus

    In 1977, Max Neuhaus turned a triangle of pedestrian space between 45th and 46th Streets in Times Square into an island of harmonic sound. The rich textures of that sound continue today, emanating from beneath the sidewalk grating, to anonymously reach an individual's ears as if one has stumbled upon a secret. Known as Times Square, the celebrated installation was restored in 2002 with support from Dia Art Foundation, which further commissioned a site-specific piece, Time Piece Beacon, from Neuhaus in 2006 for its museum in Beacon, New York. This stunning book - the only volume in print dedicated solely to the work of Neuhaus - takes these two projects as a point of departure from which to consider the singular impact this artist has had in establishing sound as a medium in contemporary art. An interview with Neuhaus is complemented with essays by multidisciplinary scholars who investigate and situate his work within a historical context.

  • The Pentateuch - An Introduction to the First Five Books of the Bible

    Available for the first time in paperback, the most comprehensive and up-to-date look at the first five books of the Bible--Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy--where they came from, and how they came to be.

  • Anna Freud - A Biography 2e

    This edition of Elisabeth Young-Bruehl's definitive biography of pioneering child analyst Anna Freud includes--among other new features--a major retrospective introduction by the author.

    Praise for the Second Edition:

    "Young-Bruehl's description of one of the most complex but brilliant lights in psychoanalytic history has stood as a beacon to students of psychoanalytic history. It is the best most carefully crafted biography of any psychoanalyst and it illuminates the entire tradition with a clarity that only the exploration of the life of the daughter of the founder of the movement could possibly provide. It is a beautifully written insightful and remarkably edifying piece of work. The best has just got better."-- Peter Fonagy, Freud Memorial Professor of Psychoanalysis, University College London

    Praise for the First Edition:

    "A gem of biographical writing. . . ."--Ron Grossman, Chicago Tribune

    "Lucid, erudite, briskly authoritative, Elisabeth Young-Bruehl . . . has given us the insight into character that makes biography an art."--James Atlas

    Elisabeth Young-Bruehl is a faculty member at the Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research and a practicing psychoanalyst in Manhattan. She lives in New York and Toronto.

  • The Works of Jonathan Edwards V20 - The ′Miscellanies′ 833-1152

    Throughout his adult life Jonathan Edwards kept a series of personal theological notebooks on a wide variety of miscellaneous subjects. This volume includes the notebook entries written during the eventful and tumultuous years 1740-1751, when Edwards was plagued by a series of bitter controversies with his Northampton congregation that culminated in his dismissal. This was also the period during which he witnessed, documented, and pondered the surprising revivals of the Great Awakening, as well as their precipitous decline.

  • Superheroes - Fashion and Fantasy

    From Wonder Womans satin stars and golden bracelets to Batmans brooding cape and mask, the style of superheroes dress has influenced both street wear and high fashion. This richly illustrated book explores how radical couture, avant-garde sportswear, and state-of-the-art military garments - as seen through the lens of the superhero - can be metaphors for sex, power, and politics. Beginning with the origins of the superhero costume, this volume looks at how designers have been influenced by iconographic components such as the cape, mask, boots, and unitard. Costumes, such as those worn by Batman and Catwoman, are examined as reflections of sexual and physical prowess, while others, most notably those of Superman and Captain America, are analyzed as political propaganda. Superheroes also explores superpowers and their manifestations in literal, symbolic, or metaphorical aspects: Flashs speed, Iron Mans invulnerability, Hulks strength, and Spidermans agility are presented in their fantastical evocations. Featured designers include Pierre Cardin, John Galliano, Azzedine Alaia, Giorgio Armani, Hussein Chalayan, Alexander McQueen, Nicolas Ghesquiere, Jean Paul Gaultier, Comme des Garcons, and Walter van Beirendonck.

  • Ordering the City: Land Use, Policing, and the Restoration of Urban America

    This timely and important book highlights the multiple, often overlooked, and frequently misunderstood connections between land use and development policies and policing practices. In order to do so, the book draws upon multiple literatures - especially law, history, economics, sociology and psychology - as well as concrete case studies to better explore how these policy arenas, generally treated as completely unrelated, intersect and conflict. Nicole Stelle Garnett identifies different types of urban 'disorder', some that may be precursors to serious crime and social deviancy; others that may be benign or even contribute positively to urban vitality. The book's unique approach - to analyze city policies through the lens of order and disorder - provides a clearer understanding, generally, of how cities work (and why they sometimes do not), and specifically, of what disorder is and how it affects city life.

  • Sabiduras and Other Texts - Writings by Gego

    A fascinating group of previously unpublished texts by the Latin American artist Gego, focusing on her exploration of line, aesthetics, and the role of art in society

    The German-born Venezuelan artist Gego (1912-1994) was renowned for her abstract drawings, prints, threedimensional works, hanging net pieces, and wire constructions. In 1999, a folder was found in a storage trunk that had belonged to Gego, with the word Sabiduras (loosely translated as "Words of Wisdom") written on the cover, containing previously unknown texts, word poems, and notes by the artist. Subsequently, additional short texts by the artist were discovered in the archives of the Gego Foundation.


    This important book assembles all of these writings together for the first time, providing an unprecedented look into Gego's philosophies of art and religion, her creative thought process, and her vast knowledge. In these texts, Gego was engaged with the line as an essential element in her research and creations; the aesthetics of transparency; art as enjoyment and pleasure for the artist and for the public; and the importance of education and training for everyone.


    The texts in this book are published in both English and Spanish (and in some cases German, which was Gego's native language) and are preceded by introductory notes. Reproductions of some of the original texts, plans for unfulfilled projects, and previously unpublished photographs are also featured. Sabiduras and Other Texts will undoubtedly motivate students, scholars, and anyone interested in the art of Latin America to learn more about Gego's contributions to modern art.

  • The Spanish Frontier in North America - The Brief Edition

    Presents the story of Spain's three-hundred-year tenure on the continent. From the first Spanish-Indian contact through Spain's gradual retreat, this title offers an assessment of the impact of each civilization upon the other.

  • Ancient Churches of Ethiopia

    The kings of Aksum formally became Christian during the second quarter of the fourth century, making Ethiopia the second country in the world (after Armenia) officially to adopt the new faith. This landmark book is the first to integrate historical, archaeological, and art-historical evidence to provide a comprehensive account of Ethiopian Christian civilization and its churches - both built and rock-hewn - from the Aksumite period to the thirteenth century. David W. Phillipson, a foremost authority on Ethiopia's archaeology, situates these churches within the development of Ethiopian society, illuminating the exceptional continuity of the country's Christian civilization. He offers a fresh view of the processes which gave rise to this unique African culture as well as the most detailed treatment of the rock-hewn churches at Lalibela World Heritage Site ever published. Abundantly illustrated, filled with original insights, and incorporating new chronological findings, this book will be of enormous interest to a wide international circle of students, scholars, and travellers.

  • Joseph Brodsky: A Literary Life

    The work of Joseph Brodsky (19401996), one of Russias great modern poets, has been the subject of much study and debate. His life, too, is the stuff of legend, from his survival of the siege of Leningrad in early childhood to his expulsion from the Soviet Union and his achievements as a Nobel Prize winner and Americas poet laureate. In this penetrating biography, Brodskys life and work are illuminated by his great friend, the late poet and literary scholar Lev Loseff. Drawing on a wide range of source materials, some previously unpublished, and extensive interviews with writers and critics, Loseff carefully reconstructs Brodskys personal history while offering deft and sensitive commentary on the philosophical, religious, and mythological sources that influenced the poets work. Published to great acclaim in Russia and now available in English for the first time, this is literary biography of the first order, and sets the groundwork for any books on Brodsky that might follow.

  • Treasures of a Lost Art: Italian Manuscript Painting of the Middle Ages and Renaissance

    A presentation from a fine private collection of Italian manuscripts. Comparable only to the legendary Cini Collection in Venice, it was formed by Robert Lehman to complement his father's holdings of early Italian panel paintings. Included are works by the major schools of illumination in southern Italy, Umbria, Tuscany, Emilia, Lombardy and the Veneto. Also represented are works by three of the principal artists in the history of Italian painting: Duccio di Buoninsegna, Stefano da Verona and Cosimo Tura.

  • Blessed and Beautiful - Picturing the Saints

    This book offers a powerful and searching meditation on the lives of the saints and the images of them painted by Renaissance artists in Italy. Robert Kiely, a distinguished scholar of modernist literature and a historian and critic of exceptional sensibility, has a keen eye and uncanny ability to capture details of significance and to prompt the reader to look again and to see with fresh eyes that the lives of saints and the Renaissance depictions of them are anything but dull, uniform, or narrowly orthodox. His beautifully written and thoughtful book treats saints seriously as human religious figures (not icons of perfection), brought to life by great Italian paintings in dialogue with scripture, legend, and poetry. Wise, learned, and readable, and offering a rare combination of insight into religion, literature, and art, this ravishingly illustrated and vividly written volume should be by your side whenever you pick up a classic text, look at a Renaissance painting, or spend a few moments in private meditation or prayer.

  • Images and Identity in Fifteenth-Century Florence

    An exploration of ways of looking in Renaissance Florence, where works of art were part of a complex process of social exchange

    Renaissance Florence, of endless fascination for the beauty of its art and architecture, is no less intriguing for its dynamic political, economic, and social life. In this book Patricia Lee Rubin crosses the boundaries of all these areas to arrive at an original and comprehensive view of the place of images in Florentine society. The author asks an array of questions: Why were works of art made? Who were the artists who made them, and who commissioned them? How did they look, and how were they looked at? She demonstrates that the answers to such questions illuminate the contexts in which works of art were created, and how they were valued and viewed. Rubin seeks out the meeting places of meaning in churches, in palaces, in piazzas--places of exchange where identities were taken on and transformed, often with the mediation of images. She concentrates on questions of vision and visuality, on "seeing and being seen." With a blend of exceptional illustrations; close analyses of sacred and secular paintings by artists including Fra Angelico, Fra Filippo Lippi, Filippino Lippi, and Botticelli; and wide-ranging bibliographic essays, the book shines new light on fifteenth-century Florence, a special place that made beauty one of its defining features.

  • Ancient Christian Martyrdom - Diverse Practices, Theologies and Traditions

    The importance of martyrdom for the spread of Christianity in the first centuries of the Common Era is a question of enduring interest. In this innovative new study, Candida Moss offers a radically new history of martyrdom in the first and second centuries that challenges traditional understandings of the spread of Christianity and rethinks the nature of Christian martyrdom itself. Martyrdom, Moss shows, was not a single idea, theology, or practice: there were diverse perspectives and understandings of what it meant to die for Christ.

    Beginning with an overview of ancient Greek, Roman, and Jewish ideas about death, Moss demonstrates that there were many cultural contexts within which early Christian views of martyrdom were very much at home. She then shows how distinctive and diverging theologies of martyrdom emerged in different ancient congregations. In the process she reexamines the authenticity of early Christian stories about martyrs and calls into question the dominant scholarly narrative about the spread of martyrdom in the ancient world.

  • Othello

    One of the most powerful dramas ever written for the stage, Othello is a story of revenge, illusion, passion, mistrust, jealousy, and murder. If in Iago Shakespeare created the most compelling villain in Western literature, in Othello and Desdemona he gave us our most tragic and unforgettable lovers.

  • Aubrey Beardsley - A Catalogue Raisonné - 2 Volume Box Set

    A comprehensive presentation of the provocative, modernist graphic works of Britain's creator of Art Nouveau

    This is the first book to bring together the recorded works of the English artist Aubrey Beardsley. Despite his early death from tuberculosis in 1898, at the age of 25, these amount to nearly 1100 completed works of art (plus many related sketches) as well as more than 100 sketches in his letters and the books he owned, and this book includes over 50 that have never previously been published.

    In his brief career Beardsley made a defining contribution to Art Nouveau in Britain and abroad. He also influenced the early history of modern art, attracting the attention of the young Picasso, for example. His distinctive and innovatory graphic style, combined with highly provocative, often sexual subject matter, outraged critics and led to a period of intense notoriety. Beardsley's drawings span the grotesque, the delicately beautiful, the subtly erotic, and the frankly bawdy, and challenged the moral norms of Victorian society. They enthralled artists and art lovers the world over and continue to enthral today.
    Linda Gertner Zatlin's text presents Beardsley's drawings with a full record of their making, provenance, exhibition history and references in the art historical literature. This material record is accompanied by often extensive discussions of their themes, motifs and symbolism, as well as their critical reception. Unprecedented in its scope and thoroughness, this study presents Beardsley's work and explores its meanings more comprehensively than any previous work on him; it is likely to remain definitive. This superbly illustrated two volume catalogue, beautifully presented as a boxed set, is both an essential reference for specialists and an accessible and enchanting delight for Beardsley enthusiasts.

  • Sex and Sensuality in the Ancient World

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  • Old Masters at the Art Institute of Chicago

    This issue of Museum Studies focuses on the Art Institute of Chicago's impressive collection of Old Master paintings, works on paper, textiles, tapestries, and sculptures. With an introduction by Larry J. Feinberg on the growth and evolution of the museum's Old Master collection, the book includes five fascinating and richly illustrated essays written by museum curators and scholars. They examine recent acquisitions and present new discoveries and scholarship on a range of works--including a recently rediscovered Nativity by Fra Bartolommeo; a late-15th-century Hispano-Flemish sculpture of Saint Michael and the Devil; a series of reattributed drawings by 17th-century artists such as Guido Reni and Guercino; a pair of early-18th-century tapestries designed by the French artist Charles LeBrun; and a stunning group of works by Charles-Antoine Coypel, Jean-Baptiste Perronneau, and Maurice Quentin de La Tour, the preeminent pastellists of 18th-century France.

  • Eva Hesse: Studiowork

    Throughout her career, Eva Hesse (1936-1970) produced a significant number of small, experimental works alongside her large-scale sculpture. These so-called 'test-pieces' were made in a wide range of materials, including latex, wire-mesh, sculp-metal, wax, and cheesecloth. Rather than considering them simply technical explorations, the art historian Briony Fer renames these small objects studiowork and argues that they put in question conventional notions of what sculpture is. The book contains a comprehensive catalogue of the studiowork, including many new works that have never before been seen in public. Although previously these small works were considered peripheral to the major sculptures, this fascinating new study argues that they force us to ask fundamental questions, not just about what an artwork is, but about the work that art does in our culture.

  • The Jewel House - Elizabeth London and the Scientific Revolution

    Not just a few elite scientists, but Londoners from all walks of life--lawyers, prisoners, midwives, merchants--participated in the scientific community of Elizabethan times

    Bestselling author Deborah Harkness (A Discovery of Witches, Shadow of Night) explores the streets, shops, back alleys, and gardens of Elizabethan London, where a boisterous and diverse group of men and women shared a keen interest in the study of nature. These assorted merchants, gardeners, barber-surgeons, midwives, instrument makers, mathematics teachers, engineers, alchemists, and other experimenters, she contends, formed a patchwork scientific community whose practices set the stage for the Scientific Revolution. While Francis Bacon has been widely regarded as the father of modern science, scores of his London contemporaries also deserve a share in this distinction. It was their collaborative, yet often contentious, ethos that helped to develop the ideals of modern scientific research.

    The book examines six particularly fascinating episodes of scientific inquiry and dispute in sixteenth-century London, bringing to life the individuals involved and the challenges they faced. These men and women experimented and invented, argued and competed, waged wars in the press, and struggled to understand the complexities of the natural world. Together their stories illuminate the blind alleys and surprising twists and turns taken as medieval philosophy gave way to the empirical, experimental culture that became a hallmark of the Scientific Revolution.

  • The Religion and Science Debate - Why Does It Continue?

    Six acclaimed scholars--including a biologist, a sociologist, a historian, a philosopher, and a physicist--examine the evolution debate.

    Eighty-one years after America witnessed the Scopes trial over the teaching of evolution in public schools, the debate between science and religion continues. In this book scholars from a variety of disciplines--sociology, history, science, and theology--provide new insights into the contemporary dialogue as well as some perspective suggestions for delineating the responsibilities of both the scientific and religious spheres.

    Why does the tension between science and religion continue? How have those tensions changed during the past one hundred years? How have those tensions impacted the public debate about so-called "intelligent design" as a scientific alternative to evolution? With wit and wisdom the authors address the conflict from its philosophical roots to its manifestations within American culture. In doing so, they take an important step toward creating a society that reconciles scientific inquiry with the human spirit. This book, which marks the one hundredth anniversary of The Terry Lecture Series, offers a unique perspective for anyone interested in the debate between science and religion in America.

  • Shopping in the Renaissance - Consumer Cultures in Italy 1400-1600

    Shopping was an important in the Renaissance as it is today. This fascinating and original book breaks new ground in the area of Renaissance material culture, focusing on the marketplace and such related topics as middle-class to courtly consumption, the provision of foodstuffs, and the acquisition of antiquities and holy relics. The book investigates how men and women of different social classes went to the streets, squares, and shops to buy goods they needed and wanted on a daily - or a once-in-a-lifetime - basis, during the Renaissance period. Evelyn Welch draws on wide-ranging sources to expose the fears, anxieties, and social possibilities of the Renaissance marketplace and to show the impact of these attitudes on developing urban spaces. She considers transient forms of sales such as fairs, auctions, and lotteries as well as consumers themselves. Finally, she explores antiquities and indulgences, both of which posed dramatic challenges to contemporary notions of market value and to the concept of commodification itself.

  • An Entirely Synthetic Fish - How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World

    An award-winning journalist, aquatic ecologist, and lifelong fisherman tells for the first time the surprising story of the rainbow trout, a revered icon for some and an all-too-common vexation for others

    Anders Halverson provides an exhaustively researched and grippingly rendered account of the rainbow trout and why it has become the most commonly stocked and controversial freshwater fish in the United States. Discovered in the remote waters of northern California, rainbow trout have been artificially propagated and distributed for more than 130 years by government officials eager to present Americans with an opportunity to get back to nature by going fishing. Proudly dubbed "an entirely synthetic fish" by fisheries managers, the rainbow trout has been introduced into every state and province in the United States and Canada and to every continent except Antarctica, often with devastating effects on the native fauna. Halverson examines the paradoxes and reveals a range of characters, from nineteenth-century boosters who believed rainbows could be the saviors of democracy to twenty-first-century biologists who now seek to eradicate them from waters around the globe. Ultimately, the story of the rainbow trout is the story of our relationship with the natural world--how it has changed and how it startlingly has not.

  • Paul McCarthy - Cantral Symmetrical Rotation Movement: Three Installations, Two Films

    This is the first publication to explore the role of mirrors, spinning, and "neurotic" architecture--a feeling of psychological breakdown--in the work of one of America's most important contemporary artists, Paul McCarthy (b. 1945). The book is published in conjunction with a major exhibition at the Whitney, for which McCarthy is creating two new installations to appear alongside his Bang Bang Room (1992) and two recently rediscovered film loops (1966, 1971).

    Each work involves a room structure that the viewer can step into and experience--often becoming disoriented as either the floor or entire structure spins, or as walls fold inward and outward. By comparing McCarthy's use of rotational movement and visual effects to that of other artists of the 1960s and

    1970s, the author seeks a new understanding of this bold innovator. An interview with McCarthy himself offers an unprecedented discussion of the influences on his art--including experimental filmmakers Stan Brakhage, Stan Vanderbeek, and Bruce Conner. The book not only raises new points but also recovers information and images from films once lost.

  • Essex

    Essex, one the largest counties of England, stretches from the suburban fringes of East London to the fishing and sailing ports of Harwich and Maldon and the famous seaside resorts of Clacton, Frinton, and Southend. Its buildings encompass rich Roman survivals, powerful Norman architecture, and the remains of major Tudor and Jacobean country houses. Essex is first and foremost a county famed for its timber buildings, from the eleventh-century church at Greensted to the early and mighty barns at Cressing Temple, and a wealth of timber-framed medieval houses. Later periods have also made their contribution, from Georgian town houses to Victorian and Edwardian industrial and civic buildings, and from important exemplars of early Modern Movement architecture to the major monument of High Tech at Stansted Airport.

  • Doonesbury and the Art of G.B. Trudeau

    Best known for his wry and incisive takes on American life and politics through the comic strip Doonesbury, Garry Trudeau is among the worlds most widely read cartoonists. Trudeau began shaping Doonesbury as an undergraduate contributor to the Yale Daily News. Today, the strip is syndicated to a daily readership of nearly 100 million. Trudeaus work has been anthologized before, but this is the first book to assess the art of the comic strip and the ways that Trudeaus iconic style has evolved over the past four decades. Brian Walker, an expert on the history of comics, sheds light on Trudeaus early influences as well as on his creative process, from research to pencil layouts to finished artwork. In addition to revealing how Doonesbury is crafted each week, the book also examines Trudeaus magazine illustrations, animation drawings, posters, and product designs, as well as some rare and previously unpublished works. Walkers historical text is complemented by insightful commentary by Trudeau and his collaborators, Don Carleton, George Corsillo, and David Stanford, making this book appealing not only to the many Doonesbury fans but also to those looking for an approach to the work of a master comic strip artist.

  • Science and Personality

    The following volume contains the substance of a series of three lectures delivered at Yale University in March 1928, and repeated in the United Congregational Church at Bridgeport, Connecticut, on the Dwight H. Terry Foundation. Its general purpose is the consideration of religion in the light of science and philosophy, and although the main science chosen for discussion has been that of psychology (also in its applied form of psychotherapy), the attempt has been made to preserve a due perspective by not omitting a consideration of the physical and biological sciences in their more general, or philosophical, aspects. The book represents a somewhat fuller treatment of the subject than was possible in the lectures, and may be regarded as a sequel and completion of the author's previous book, Mind and Personality, since it is an attempt to deal more thoroughly with the problem of personality in its relation to science and to the general concept of 'value.' Although much of the discussion is abstract and philosophical, it is based upon scientific evidence gained by close and prolonged observation, in hospital and consulting room, of disturbances of human character and conduct.

  • Biblical Hebrew (3 CD Audio)

    This revised edition of the best-selling Biblical Hebrew is thoroughly updated and augmented for a new generation of students. Designed for use in a two-term course, the book's fifty-five lessons are constructed around Biblical verses or segments and arranged in order of increasing complexity. At the successful completion of the course, students will be well equipped to tackle prose passages on their own. Biblical Hebrew is part of a comprehensive learning programme that also includes three entirely new audio CDs and a companion volume, The Supplement. The CDs present the alphabet and vowels, readings, catchy songs to assist with memorising grammar concepts, Psalms performed as songs in a variety of styles, and vocabulary lists. The Supplement offers abundant reinforcement and review activities along with additional detail about topics introduced in the text.

  • Buriki - Japanese Tin Toys from the Global Age of the American Automobile

    Tin toys have been made in Japan for more than 100 years, but during World War II their production - and international sales - ended. Almost as soon as the war was over, ingenious manufacturers began to make model Jeeps out of recycled food cans. With the resumption of international trade in 1948, exports of more sophisticated metal toys soared. At the same time, the postwar boom in the United States led to an increasingly automobile-based society - the perfect inspiration for Japan's gifted toy designers. As leading marques competed to market ever more seductively styled autos to U.S. consumers, Japanese toy manufacturers followed styling trends closely, retooling often to create miniature versions of the latest models; airplanes, spaceships, and other vehicles were also popular. The Tanaka collection is a treasure-trove of more than 500 immaculate model vehicles, enthusiastically collected over the last 50 years. Buriki offers a lively tour of its highlights, evoking the heady, expansive spirit of the 1950s in both the U.S. and Japan. Its 60 cars, along with prime examples of other modes of transportation, will delight young and old with the quality of their detailing and bright colour schemes.

  • James II

    James II (1633-1701) lacked the charisma of his father, Charles I, but shared his tendency to dismiss the views of others when they differed from his own. Failing to understand his subjects, James was also misunderstood by them. In this highly-regarded biography, John Miller reassesses James II and his reign, drawing on a wide array of primary sources from France, Italy, and Ireland as well as England. Miller argues that the king had many laudable attributes--he was brave, loyal, honorable, and hard-working, and he was at least as benevolent toward his people as his father had been. Yet James's conversion to Catholicism fueled the distrust of his Protestant subjects who placed the worst possible construction on his actions and statements. Although James came to see the securing of religious freedom for Catholics in the wider context of freedom for all religious minorities, his people naturally doubted the sincerity of his commitment to toleration.

    The book explores James's relations with the state and society, focusing on the political, diplomatic, and religious issues that shaped his reign. Miller discusses the human failings, the gulf of understanding between the king and his subjects, and the sheer bad luck that led to James's downfall. He also considers the reasons for James's lack of interest in recovering his kingdom after his flight to France in 1688. This revised edition of the book includes a substantial new foreword assessing recent work on the reign.

    "This is a first-class essay in historical biography. . . . It must displace all previous lives of James II."--J. P. Kenyon, Observer

  • Fundamentals of Chinese Characters

    Fundamentals of Chinese Characters focuses on the connections between the shapes and meanings of basic Chinese characters, enabling students to learn to recognize and write Chinese characters before they learn to speak Chinese.

    Presenting fundamental knowledge of Chinese characters according to their intrinsic regularity rather than in the sequence often used in teaching spoken Chinese, this book enables teachers to offer students a course on Chinese characters alongside a Chinese language course at the elementary level.

    With interactive exercises, rhymes for all the characters covered in the book, and illustrations for all the basic characters, this book makes learning Chinese characters easy and fun.

  • Liberty to the Downtrodden

    Thomas L. Kane (1822-1883), a crusader for antislavery, women's rights and the downtrodden, rose to prominence in his day as the most ardent and persuasive defender of Mormons' religious liberty. Though not a Mormon, Kane sought to defend the much-reviled group from the 'Holy War' waged against them by evangelical America. His courageous personal intervention averted a potentially catastrophic bloody conflict between federal troops and Mormon settlers in the now nearly forgotten Utah War of 1857-58. Drawing on extensive, newly available archives, this book is the first to tell the full story of Kane's extraordinary life. The book illuminates his powerful Philadelphia family, his personal life and eccentricities, his reform achievements, his place in Mormon history, and his career as a Civil War general. Further, the book revises previous understandings of nineteenth-century reform, showing how Kane and like minded others fused Democratic Party ideology, anti-evangelicalism, and romanticism.

  • Lost Land of the Dodo: An Ecological History of Mauritius, Reunion, & Rodrigues

    A fascinating new perspective on the extinction of the ill-fated dodo and many other native species on the Mascarene Islands

    Uninhabited by humans, the Mascarene Islands of the Indian Ocean were once home to an extraordinary range of birds and reptiles: giant tortoises, parrots, skinks, geckos, burrowing boas, flightless rails and herons, and, most famously, dodos. But the discovery of the three isolated islands in the 1500s, and their colonization in the 1600s, led to dramatic ecological changes. The dodo became extinct on its home island of Mauritius within several decades, and over the next 150 years most native vertebrates suffered the same fate. This fascinating book provides the first full ecological history of the Mascarene Islands as well as the specific story of each extinct vertebrate, accompanied by Julian Hume's superb color illustrations.

  • Vietnam - A Natural History

    A milestone book that provides the first guide to Vietnam's spectacular flora and fauna and the diverse natural areas in which they live

    A country uncommonly rich in plants, animals, and natural habitats, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam shelters a significant portion of the world's biological diversity, including rare and unique organisms and an unusual mixture of tropical and temperate species. This book is the first comprehensive account of Vietnam's natural history in English. Illustrated with maps, photographs, and thirty-five original watercolor illustrations, the book offers a complete tour of the country's plants and animals along with a full discussion of the factors shaping their evolution and distribution.
    Separate chapters focus on northern, central, and southern Vietnam, regions that encompass tropics, subtropics, mountains, lowlands, wetland and river regions, delta and coastal areas, and offshore islands. The authors provide detailed descriptions of key natural areas to visit, where a traveler might explore limestone caves or glimpse some of the country's twenty-seven monkey and ape species and more than 850 bird species. The book also explores the long history of humans in the country, including the impact of the Vietnam-American War on plants and animals, and describes current efforts to conserve Vietnam's complex, fragile, and widely threatened biodiversity.

  • Fife

    Fife's most famous buildings include Dunfermline Abbey, with its sturdy Norman nave; St Andrews cathedral, the focus of the old University town on the North Sea coast; the foursquare post-Reformation kirk at Burntisland; the palace of Falkland, where James V became Britain's first patron of Renaissance architecture on the grand scale; and the little royal burghs along the coastal fringe, each with its harbour and its strings of vernacular houses presided over by the kirk and tollbooth. Cupar, at the centre of Fife's long peninsula, is the seat of local government and one of the most charming and prosperous of Scottish towns. Less well known are Fife's tower houses like Scotstarvit, the old seaboard castles of St Andrews and Ravenscraig, the picturesque Balgonie Castle and the thoroughly domesticated Kellie Castle. Of Fife's churches one of the most beautiful is Dairsie; and three centuries of inventive design in burial monuments come to an unexpected climax in a work by Charles Rennie Mackintosh in the MacDuff cemetery, East Wemyss.

  • The Serbs - History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia

    'The Serbs' was published in hardcover in 1997, and paperbacked in 1998. It was reissued as a NB paperback in 2000, and reprinted regularly since then. There is a lot to catch-up on in this second edition. It covers the Kosovo War, and the overthrow of Milosevic, with close-up accounts of his trial at the Hague, and subsequent death. It looks at the assassination of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindic in 2003, and its consequences. It deals with Montenegro's plebiscite in favour of independence in May 2006, and subsequent dissolution of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro, and re-emergence of Serbia as an independent state, under its own name, later that year. It also covers the unilateral proclamation of independence by Kosovo in February 2008, its recognition by most western countries and its opposition by Russia, China and Spain. And it provides an inside account of the identification and arrest of Radovan Karadzic in July 2008 and indictment on charges of genocide at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, which is ongoing. Ratko Mladic, the 'butcher of Serbia' of course remains in hiding.

  • The Encylopedia of Historic & Endangered Livestock & Poultry Breeds

    The hardy, multipurpose Dominique chickens that came to the New World with the Pilgrims and later traveled in pioneer saddlebags to help settle the West were once too numerous to count; by 1990 a mere 500 hens survived. This is but a single example of the diminishing diversity of farm animals: half of once-common livestock breeds are endangered, others are already extinct.

    The need to preserve farm animal diversity is increasingly urgent, says the author of this definitive book on endangered breeds of livestock and poultry. Farmyard animals may hold critical keys for our survival, Jan Dohner warns, and with each extinction, genetic traits of potentially vital importance to our agricultural future or to medical progress are forever lost.

    This comprehensive book features:
    - complete information on the history, characteristics, qualities, and traits of 138 endangered livestock breeds (goats, sheep, swine, cattle, horses, other equines) and 53 poultry breeds (chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese)
    - where these breeds may be seen today
    - the degree of rarity of each breed in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada
    - information on feral livestock populations
    - 160 color photographs and over 80 black and white photos and historical illustrations

  • Still Life And Trade In The Dutch Golden Age

    Seventeenth-century Dutch paintings of the laid table are rich with products of the trade that made the country's fortunes during this period - yet they are traditionally interpreted as moralizing against excess. This is the first book to unpack the complex histories of these commodities in order to explore the contradictory implications in these extraordinary pictures. The vast scope of the Dutch trade network carries this study to the far corners of the earth: from domestically sourced cheese, herring and beer, to grain, lemons and wine from the rest of Europe, pepper, porcelain and tea imported by the Dutch East India Company, and the West India Company's salt, tobacco, sugar and even slaves. Drawing from a wide array of sources, from period medical treatises to the then-equivalent of the daily news and the scholarship of historians then and now, the book illuminates a wealth of allusions within a genre supposedly devoid of narrative. Anthropological in its approach to art as a cultural system, this study makes a distinctive interdisciplinary contribution not only to its field of art history but to the history of foods, economic history, post-colonial discourse on the meetings between Europe and its many Others in the early modern period, and most of all, the profound intersection of all these concerns in the visual culture of the age. As striking pictorial expressions of a significant stage in the development of capitalist consumer culture, these paintings ultimately reveal much more than meets the eye. Their traditional moralizing interpretation is challenged by the 'trade secrets' uncovered in this account. Serving up the fruits of global commerce on glowing silver platters comfortably removed from the exploitation that fuelled the Dutch Republic's phenomenal rise to prosperity, they pose food for thought for today's society as well.

  • Building a New Europe - Portraits of Modern Architects, Essays by George Nelson 1935-36

    Fascinating profiles of the leading architects of the 1930s during a crucial period in the evolution of modernism

    Architect, designer, and architectural critic, George Nelson (1908-1986) was a young and impressionable architect when he wrote a series of articles in 1935 and 1936 that eloquently introduced astonishing buildings and fascinating personalities from across the Atlantic to wider American audiences. Building a New Europe presents this important collection of writings together for the first time. The subjects of Nelson's essays include figures both major (Mies van Der Rohe and Le Corbusier) and minor (Helweg-Moeller and Ivar Tengbom). All of these architects would soon be affected by World War II--they would be put out of work or seek new careers abroad. Nelson's essays spark fascinating questions about the canon of modernism: how would circumstances in the pre-war years cause some architects to rise and others to fall? Accompanied by a comprehensive introduction and a wide selection of archival photographs, many never before published, this unique study is a significant contribution to the history of modern architecture.

  • Making Renaissance Art - Renaissance Art Reconsidered

    This book explores key themes in the making of Renaissance painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints: the use of specific techniques and materials, theory and practice, change and continuity in artistic procedures, conventions and values. It also reconsiders the importance of mathematical perspective, the assimilation of the antique revival, and the illusion of life.
    Embracing the full significance of Renaissance art requires understanding how it was made. As manifestations of technical expertise and tradition as much as innovation, artworks of this period reveal highly complex creative processes--allowing us an inside view on the vexed issue of the notion of a renaissance.

  • Franz Schubert - The Complete Songs

    This three-volume boxed set is the definitive work on Franz Schubert's vocal music with piano. A richly illustrated encyclopedia, these substantial volumes contain more than seven hundred song commentaries with parallel text and translations (by Richard Wigmore), detailed annotations on the songs' poetic sources, and biographies of one hundred and twenty poets, as well as general articles on accompaniment, tonality, transcriptions, singers, and more. Written by Graham Johnson--celebrated accompanist, author, and the first pianist ever to record all of Schubert's songs and part-songs--this sumptuous work is a must for performers, scholars, and all lovers of Schubert lieder.

  • Emerald City - An Enviromental History of Seattle

    An exploration of the environmental history of Seattle and what it tells us about making cities that are both scenic and just for all

    At the foot of the snow-capped Cascade Mountains on the forested shores of Puget Sound, Seattle is set in a location of spectacular natural beauty. Boosters of the city have long capitalized on this splendor, recently likening it to the fairytale capital of L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz, the Emerald City. But just as Dorothy, Toto, and their traveling companions discover a darker reality upon entering the green gates of the imaginary Emerald City, those who look more closely at Seattle's landscape will find that it reveals a history marked by environmental degradation and urban inequality. This book explores the role of nature in the development of the city of Seattle from the earliest days of its settlement to the present. Combining environmental history, urban history, and human geography, Matthew Klingle shows how attempts to reshape nature in and around Seattle have often ended not only in ecological disaster but also social inequality. The price of Seattle's centuries of growth and progress has been paid by its wildlife, including the famous Pacific salmon, and its poorest residents. Klingle proposes a bold new way of understanding the interdependence between nature and culture, and he argues for what he calls an "ethic of place." Using Seattle as a compelling case study, he offers important insights for every city seeking to live in harmony with its natural landscape.

  • Art of the Samurai: Japanese Arms and Armor, 1156-1868

    Samurai arms and equipment are widely recognized as masterpieces in steel, silk, and lacquer. This extensively illustrated volume is published in conjunction with the first comprehensive exhibition devoted to the arts of the samurai. It includes the finest examples of swords - the spirit of the samurai - as well as sword mountings and fittings, armour and helmets, saddles, banners, and paintings. The objects in the catalogue, drawn entirely from public and private collections in Japan, feature more than 100 officially designated national treasures and important cultural properties. Dating from the 5th to the 19th century, these majestic works offer a complete picture of samurai culture and its unique blend of the martial and the refined. Many of the greatest Japanese blade makers are represented in this volume, from the earliest 'koto' (old sword) masters such as Yasuie (12th century) and Tomomitsu (14th century) to the Edo-period smiths Nagasone Kotetsu and Kiyomaro. These blades, cherished as much for their beauty as for their cutting effectiveness, were equipped with elaborate hilts and scabbards prized for their exquistive craftsmanship and materials, including silk, rayskin, gold, lacquer and alloys unique to Japan, such as 'shakudo' and 'shibuichi'. Japanese armour is also fully surveyed, from the rarest iron armour of the Kofun period (5th century) to the inventive ceremonial helmets made towards the end of the age of the samurai.

  • Alexander Calder: The Paris Years, 1926-1933

    In 1926, Alexander Calder (1898-1976) moved from New York to Paris and began to use time and motion as 'materials' for animating line and space. Calder's years in Paris - an understudied part of the artist's career - is the focus of this marvellous publication. A team of international scholars discusses Calder's many innovations of this period, chief among them his abstract, motorized, and mobile works. They analyze the extended cast of Calder's animated Circus, made in Paris between 1926 and 1931, and include previously unpublished photographs by Brassai and Kertesz of Calder and this beloved performative sculpture. The essays critically explore the intellectual, cultural, and artistic milieu of Paris in the late 1920s and early 1930s and the contexts of Calder's friendships with Miro, Mondrian, Duchamp, and Man Ray, among others. What emerges in this fascinating book is a nuanced and detailed understanding of how Calder's distinctive career first took flight.

  • The Portrait Now

    Howgate and Nairne, director of the National Portrait Gallery, team up in The Portrait Now, an informative and exciting international gathering of more than 80 portraits by contemporary artists. Diverse in media, style, and intent, the works include Alessandro Raho's realistic oil portrait of Dame Judi Dench and Eric Fischl's expressive double portrait of Joan Didion and her late husband, John Gregory Dunne, as well as paintings by such signature portraitists as Alex Katz, Elizabeth Peyton, Francesco Clemente, and Chuck Close and photographs by Malick Sidib\'e9, Zhang Huan, and Pinar Yola\'e7an

  • Geoarchaeology - The Earth-Science Approach to Archaeological Interpretation 2e

    An indispensable book for all professionals and students interested in the field of geoarchaeology, including those with limited earth-science experience, this new edition of Geoarchaeology builds on the success and innovation of the first edition and includes updates, new concepts and examples, an enhanced bibliography, and many new illustrations. The second edition begins by considering the history and theory of geoarchaeology. Rapp and Hill then move to discussions of soils and environmental interpretations; initial context and site formation; methods of discovery and spatial analyses; estimating time; paleoenvironments, landscapes, and the human past; identifying, analyzing, and sourcing raw materials; and construction, destruction, and conservation of sites and materials.
    "[This book] covers a wide range of topics . . . with clarity and balance. . . . [The] chapters are all well written and have concise introductory discussions that are not too detailed and not too brief. . . . Beautifully produced."--Michael Waters, Geoarchaeology: An International Journal (on the first edition)

  • Birmingham - Pevsner Architectural Guides

    This is a detailed, authoritative, and easy-to-use guide to the architectural wealth of England's second city, the "workshop of the world." Birmingham's major buildings include its splendid English Baroque cathedral, pioneering Neo-Roman town hall, and still controversial Central Library of the 1970s. Streets of rich and varied Victorian and Edwardian architecture bear witness to an earlier era when Birmingham's civic initiatives were the admiration of the country. More recently, the city has been rejuvenated with architecture on a giant scale, including the iconoclastic Selfridges and the canalside precinct of Brindleyplace, where Modernism and Classical Revival are excitingly juxtaposed.

    The guide also explores a variety of outer districts and suburbs, among them the famous Jewellery Quarter, the stucco villas of Edgbaston, and Cadbury's celebrated Garden Suburb at Bournville. A connecting theme is provided by the local Arts and Crafts school, which flourished well into the twentieth century.

  • Sun, Wind and Rain - the Art of David Cox

    Born in Birmingham, England, in 1783, David Cox was destined to become a major figure in the linked worlds of landscape painting and watercolor painting in the first half of the nineteenth century. Remarkably, no significant study of the artist has been undertaken in more than a century. This beautifully illustrated volume focuses much-needed attention on Cox, filling in the details of his biography and illuminating his contributions to British landscape painting. Cox's widely-known Sun, Wind, and Rain, painted in 1845, is emblematic of his concern with the representation of light and atmosphere and weather. He was unparalleled in his ability to capture the effects of wind and weather. Scott Wilcox's chapter in this book investigates Cox's artistic identity and his legacy. Other chapters address such topics as Birmingham's cultural milieu; myths about Cox's life; the papers he chose; his painting in oils; and the fakes, forgeries, and misattributions that have challenged attempts to identify his oeuvre with certainty.

  • Becoming Venetian - Immigrants and the Arts in Early Modern Venice

    Few, if any, early modern European cities boasted a population as racially, ethnically and religiously diverse as Renaissance Venice, from German merchants living in the Fondaco dei Tedeschi to the Jewish inhabitants of the Ghetto. This innovative and fascinating book focuses on the wealthy elite of that immigrant population. From monumental palaces to pictorial cycles, Blake de Maria examines the artistic patronage commissioned by and associated with rich immigrant merchants who relocated to Venice with the aim of becoming Venetian cittadini, or citizens. Situated between the patriciate and popular orders, cittadini occupied the middle-tier of Venice's tripartite social hierarchy. Unlike the nobility, the citizenry was not a closed caste, and foreign individuals not fortunate enough to be born in Venice could become naturalized citizens provided they met certain requirements. As newcomers to the city, immigrant merchant families had to acquire the material commodities necessary for everyday life. Housing had to be procured, botteghe opened and income earned. The need to establish an appropriate spiritual identity proved equally pressing. De Maria investigates important aspects of the artistic, commercial and familial activities of naturalized citizen families. Much of the documentation concerning their commercial interests, real estate development, household management, chapel decoration and confraternity affiliations has not previously been published, allowing this study to expand both the context and the interpretation of Venetian painting and architecture of the highest calibre, including the commissions to Titian, Tintoretto and Veronese. De Maria addresses, moreover, issues beyond the boundaries of art-historical analysis and considers the communal functions of this merchant clan, their social identity as naturalized citizens, their contributions to the fabric of early modern Venice and their complex relationship with Venice's native population. The result is an extremely important study, rich in pioneering new material and full of human interest, that sheds light on a significant, hitherto little-known sector in Venetian artistic patronage.

  • The Victorians and the Prehistoric - Tracks to a Lost World

    As the Victorians excavated the earth to create canals and railways in the early part of the nineteenth century, geological discoveries brought to light new narratives of the prehistoric, ideas that resounded in British society, art, and literature of the period. This engaging and generously illustrated book explores the Victorian fascination with all things prehistoric.

    Michael Freeman shows how men and women were both energized and unsettled by the realization that the formation of the earth over hundreds of millions of years and Darwin's theories about the origins of life contradicted what they had read in the Bible. He describes the rock and fossil collecting craze that emerged, the sources of inspiration and imagery discovered by writers and artists, and the new importance of geologists and paleontologists. He also discusses the cathedral-like museums that sprang up in cities and towns, shrines to all that was progressive in the age but still clothed in the trappings of traditional ideas.

  • Modernism in American Silver 20th-Century Design

    A lavishly illustrated catalogue that is the first to explore the role of modernism in 20th- century American silver design

    From teaspoons to cocktail shakers and unique objects made for New York World's Fairs, this stunning book examines the influence of modernism upon industrially produced silverware made in the United States from 1925 to 2000. Featuring the Dallas Museum of Art's Jewel Stern American Silver Collection-- which comprises over four hundred extraordinary works in the modern idiom--as well as other objects in the Museum's collection, and selected pieces on loan, Modernism in American Silver is the first book to study the full scope of progressive design in American silver of the twentieth century.


    The book not only focuses on the works of such widely known designers as Michael Graves, Richard Meier, Tommi Parzinger, Elsa Peretti, Eliel Saarinen, Belle Kogan, and Lella and Massimo Vigelli, it also reveals the role of others largely unrecognized, among them Donald H. Colflesh, Kurt Eric Christoffersen, Helen Hughes Dulany, Robert J. King, and Elsa Tennhardt, who were instrumental in shaping silverware for a New Age.


    For collectors, scholars, designers, students, and museum visitors interested in silver and design, this book is a beautiful and essential resource.

  • The Myth of American Exceptionalism

    The idea that the United States is destined to spread its unique gifts of democracy and capitalism to other countries is dangerous for Americans and for the rest of the world, warns Godfrey Hodgson in this provocative book. Hodgson, a shrewd and highly respected British commentator, argues that America is not as exceptional as it would like to think; its blindness to its own history has bred a complacent nationalism and a disastrous foreign policy that has isolated and alienated it from the global community. Tracing the development of America's high self-regard from the early days of the republic to the present era, Hodgson demonstrates how its exceptionalism has been systematically exaggerated and, in recent decades, corrupted. While there have been distinct and original elements in America's history and political philosophy, notes Hodgson, these have always been more heavily influenced by European thought and experience than Americans have been willing to acknowledge. A stimulating and timely assessment of how America's belief in its exceptional destiny has led it astray, this book is mandatory reading for its citizens, admirers, and detractors.

  • City - Urbanism and its End

    A new understanding of the modern city, its challenges, and why old ideas about urban renewal won't work

    How did neighborhood groceries, parish halls, factories, and even saloons contribute more to urban vitality than did the fiscal might of postwar urban renewal? With a novelist's eye for telling detail, Douglas Rae depicts the features that contributed most to city life in the early "urbanist" decades of the twentieth century. Rae's subject is New Haven, Connecticut, but the lessons he draws apply to many American cities. City: Urbanism and Its End beginswith a richly textured portrait of New Haven in the early twentieth century, a period of centralized manufacturing, civic vitality, and mixed-use neighborhoods. As social and economic conditions changed, the city confronted its end of urbanism first during the Depression, and then very aggressively during the mayoral reign of Richard C. Lee (1954-70), when New Haven led the nation in urban renewal spending. But government spending has repeatedly failed to restore urban vitality. Rae argues that strategies for the urban future should focus on nurturing the unplanned civic engagements that make mixed-use city life so appealing and so civilized. Cities need not reach their old peaks of population, or look like thriving suburbs, to be once again splendid places for human beings to live and work.

  • The Robert Shaw Reader

    Robert Shaw is considered to be the most influential choral conductor in American history. This is the first collection of his letters and notes about music ever published--at another time, it is the book Shaw would have written himself.
    The letters are an invigorating mix of music history and analysis, philosophy, inspiration, and practical advice. Shaw examines technique, but only as a means to an end--he moves beyond that, delving into the essence of what music is and what it has to say to us. The heart of the book is composed of Shaw's previously unpublished notes on fifteen major choral works, ranging from Bach's B Minor Mass to Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms.
    Often inspiring and sometime hilarious, these writings reveal the full breadth of Shaw's knowledge, intensity, and humor.

  • Proverbs 1-9

    In Proverbs 1-9, Bible scholar Michael V. Fox translates and explains the meaning of the first nine chapters of this profound, timeless book, and examines their place in the intellectual history of ancient Israel. This thorough study of Proverbs includes a survey of the collections of ancient Near Eastern wisdom literature, as well as innovative and insightful comments. In addition to the translation and commentary proper, Fox includes several extended thematic essays on Proverbs 1-9, covering such themes as the origins of personified wisdom, what wisdom is, and where wisdom can be heard, plus an appendix of textual notes. The format of the commentary makes it accessible to the general reader and also provides materials of special interest to scholars. This is the first of a two-volume commentary that accords Proverbs the depth of study it deserves.

  • The Arts Of Intimacy - Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Making of Castilian Culture

    This splendidly illustrated book is a history of medieval Castile from the 11th to 14th centuries, told from a largely cultural standpoint. Whilst the political narrative of these centuries may emphasise war and intolerance - the inexorable forward march of the reconquista, the authors argue that the cultural record tells a very different story. They emphasise the concept of hybridisation, and show how interaction rather than antagonism more often informed cultural transactions between Christians, Muslims and Jews in the great cities of the region, focusing on Toledo, Seville and Cordoba. The extraordinary architecture of the region receives probably the most attention, but none of the visual arts miss out, and there are also extensive discussions and translations of the poetry and written culture of the three communities. A beautiful testament to a unique artistic culture, and an engaging presentation of the growing argument for a surpringly mixed cultural world.

  • Francois Duquesnoy and the Greek Ideal

    This book is the first in English devoted to Francois Duquesnoy, a central figure in seventeenth-century European sculpture, a rival to Bernini and a leading light in an artistic milieu that included Poussin and Rubens. Estelle Lingo reconstructs Duquesnoy's pursuit in Rome of a modern artistic practice 'in the Greek manner'. Reconstruction of Duquesnoy's Greek ideal enables Lingo to offer new interpretations of his exquisite marble and bronze sculptures. Moreover, she demonstrates that the archaeological and poetic vision of Greek art developed by Duquesnoy and his circle formed the basis of Johann Joachim Winckelmann's influential "Reflections on the Imitation of Greek Works in Painting and Sculpture" - thus overturning the long-held assumption that no meaningful distinction was made between ancient Greek and Roman art prior to Winckelmann's work in the eighteenth century. Examining in detail how Duquesnoy developed and employed his 'Greek manner', Lingo brings to light the extent of his contributions to European culture and aesthetics, and to the rise of Neoclassicism.

  • The Language of Adam

    The Bank of England symbolizes the economic strength, influence, and potency of Britain. Founded in 1694, its world-famous buildings were built and rebuilt four times by different architects, most notably Sir John Soane. The Bank's three-and-aquarter-acre complex has included elegant public banking halls and private offices, courtyards and gardens, warehouses and vaults, residential apartments and guards' barracks. This lavishly illustrated book examines for the first time the entire architectural history of the Bank from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries.
    Drawing on a variety of perspectives, the book relates the history of the Bank of England to current debates on English economic, social, and urban history, including issues of national identity, mercantile politics, and the commercialization of culture. The book also shows how the building itself has expressed various historical tensions among the Bank's inhabitants and publics: its directors and detractors, its clerks and clientele, its tourists, and even its mob attackers.

  • The Clarinet

    The clarinet has a long and rich history as a solo, orchestral, and chamber musical instrument. In this broad-ranging account Eric Hoeprich, a performer, teacher, and expert on historical clarinets, explores its development, repertoire, and performance history.

    Looking at the antecedents of the clarinet, as well as such related instruments as the chalumeau, basset horn, alto clarinet, and bass clarinet, Hoeprich explains the use and development of the instrument in the Baroque age. The period from the late 1700s to Beethoven's early years is shown to have fostered ever wider distribution and use of the instrument, and a repertoire of increasing richness. The first half of the nineteenth century, a golden age for the clarinet, brought innovation in construction and great virtuosity in performance, while the following century and a half produced a surge in new works from many composers. The author also devotes a chapter to the role of the clarinet in bands, folk music, and jazz.

  • Collecting Modern - Design at the Philadelphia Museum of Art Since 1876

    The Philadelphia Museum of Art was founded in 1876, after its home city hosted the Centennial, with the primary goal of acquiring important examples of contemporary design and decorative arts. Collecting Modern explores for the first time the development and significance of this extraordinary collection, making unprecedented use of the Museum's archival resources, much of which has never been published. This overview reveals changing attitudes toward collecting over time, as Philadelphia (historically a conservative city) and its flagship museum were confronted with the dramatic aesthetic shifts heralded by modernism.

    From being the largest institutional collector of Tiffany glass in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, to coaxing Florence Knoll Bassett out of retirement in 2005 to design her own exhibition, the Museum has made a unique contribution to the history of design through its collections and programs. Providing a thoughtful analysis of the Museum's history as a steward of contemporary decorative arts, this beautiful publication is a vital reference for anyone interested in the history of museums, decorative arts, and design.

  • Law and the Contradictions of the Disability Rights Movement

    The passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990 was hailed as revolutionary legislation, but in the ensuing years restrictive Supreme Court decisions have prompted accusations that the Court has betrayed the disability rights movement. The ADA can lay claim to notable successes, yet people with disabilities continue to be unemployed at extremely high rates. In this timely book, Samuel Bagenstos examines the history of the movement and discusses the various, often-conflicting projects of diverse participants. He argues that while the courts deserve some criticism, some may also be fairly aimed at the choices made by prominent disability rights activists as they crafted and argued for the ADA. The author concludes with an assessment of the limits of anti-discrimination law in integrating and empowering people with disabilities, and he suggests new policy directions to make these goals a reality.

  • Action/Abstraction - Pollock, de Kooning and American Art 1940-1976

    The abstract paintings of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Barnett Newman, Lee Krasner, Clyfford Still, Helen Frankenthaler and others revolutionized the art world in the 1940s and 1950s and continue to inspire passionate arguments to this day. What were these artists trying to achieve? Who were the critical voices of the time that rallied public interest in Abstract Expressionism and sparked rancorous debate? Drawing on recent critical, historical and biographical work, this lavishly illustrated book offers a sharp new focus on a pivotal art movement. It also presents an extensive commentary on the two most influential critics of postwar American art - Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg - whose powerful views shaped perceptions of Abstract Expressionism and other contemporary art movements. In one essay, Norman Kleeblatt traces the influence of Abstract Expressionism into the mid-1970s and examines its connection to subsequent art styles. Other essays range from the literary and intellectual culture of New York during that period and an analysis of sculpture and representation to a discussion of Jewish issues in relation to postwar American Art. In addition, the book features a magisterial essay by eminent critic Irving Sandler and a copiously illustrated cultural time line by Maurice Berger.

  • A Little History of The World.

    In 1935, with a doctorate in art history and no prospect of a job, the 26-year-old Ernst Gombrich was invited to attempt a history of the world for younger readers. Amazingly, he completed the task in an intense six weeks, and Eine kurze Weltgeschichte fur junge Leser was published in Vienna to immediate success, and is now available in twenty-five languages across the world. Toward the end of his long life, Gombrich embarked upon a revision and, at last, an English translation. A Little History of the World presents his lively and involving history to English-language readers for the first time. Superbly designed and freshly illustrated, this is a book to be savoured and collected. In forty concise chapters, Gombrich tells the story of man from the stone age to the atomic bomb. In between emerges a colourful picture of wars and conquests, grand works of art, and the spread and limitations of science. This is a text dominated not by dates and facts, but by the sweep of mankind's experience across the centuries, a guide to humanity's achievements and an acute witness to its frailties. The product of a generous and humane sensibility, this timeless account makes intelligible the full span of human history.

  • Wearing Propaganda - Textiles in Japan, Britain and the United States 1931-1945

    Protest fashion from the Vietnam War years is widely familiar, but today few are aware that dramatic fashion and textile designs served as patriotic propaganda for the Japanese, British, and Americans during the Asia-Pacific War (1931-1945). This fabulously illustrated book presents hundreds of examples of how fashion was employed by those on all sides of the conflict to boost morale and fan patriotism.

    From a kimono lined with images of U.S. planes blowing up to a British scarf emblazoned with hopeful anti-rationing slogans, Wearing Propaganda documents the development of the role of fashion as propaganda first in Japan and soon thereafter in Britain and the United States. The book discusses traditional and contemporary Japanese styles and what they revealed about Japanese domestic attitudes to war, and it shows how these attitudes echoed or contrasted with British and American fashions that were virulently anti-Japanese in some instances, humorously upbeat about wartime deprivations in others. With insights into style and design, fashion history, material culture, and the social history of Japan, the United States, and Britain, this book offers unexpected riches for every reader.

  • Datebooks 1964/65 3V Set

    Sunday, June 21, 1964 "Studio--To date have again done mainly drawings. Coming along. Sometimes I feel they're good, often I get discouraged. Staying at studio gets a little easier + more pleasant. I usually take break + come home. Tom stays."---Eva Hesse In 1964--65, Eva Hesse lived with her husband, sculptor Tom Doyle, in Kettwig-on-the-Ruhr, Germany, at the invitation of a European art collector. During this time, as she did throughout most of her life, Hesse kept diaries and made extensive notations in datebook calendars. These two datebooks, published for the first time as facsimile editions, are accompanied by a third volume that includes an essay on their significance in the artist's career as well as full transcriptions and annotations. The 1964/65 datebooks impart astonishingly rich personal details about the artist's life: whom she met and where she traveled, which books she read, and which films and exhibitions she saw and what impression they made on her. Hesse's notations also reveal invaluable insights into the German art scene of the mid-1960s, her transition from a painter to a sculptor and her often conflicted artistic ambitions, the stresses of her marriage, and the difficulties of returning to Germany, the country that in 1938 she fled with her family to escape Nazi persecution.

  • The Kirov Murder and Soviet History

    Drawing on hundreds of newly available, top-secret KGB and party Central Committee documents, historian Matthew E. Lenoe reexamines the 1934 assassination of Leningrad party chief Sergei Kirov. Joseph Stalin used the killing as the pretext to unleash the Great Terror that decimated the Communist elite in 1937-1938; these previously unavailable documents raise new questions about whether Stalin himself ordered the murder, a subject of speculation since 1938. The book includes translations of 125 documents from the various investigations of the Kirov murder, allowing readers to reach their own conclusions about Stalin's involvement in the assassination.

  • Fallen Giants - A History of Himalayan Mountineering from the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes

    The first successful ascent of Mount Everest in 1953 by Sir Edmund Hillary and his Sherpa teammate Tenzing Norgay is a familiar saga, but less well known are the tales of many other adventurers who also came to test their skills and courage against the world's highest and most dangerous mountains. In this lively and generously illustrated book, historians Maurice Isserman and Stewart Weaver present the first comprehensive history of Himalayan mountaineering in fifty years. They offer detailed, original accounts of the most significant climbs since the 1890s, and they compellingly evoke the social and cultural worlds that gave rise to those expeditions. The book recounts the adventures of such figures as Martin Conway, who led the first authentic Himalayan climbing expedition in 1892; Fanny Bullock Workman, the pioneer explorer of the Karakoram range; George Mallory, the romantic martyr of Mount Everest fame; Charlie Houston, who led American expeditions to K2 in the 1930s and 1950s; Ang Tharkay, the legendary Sherpa, and many others. Throughout, the authors discuss the effects of political and social change on the world of mountaineering, and they offer a penetrating analysis of a culture that once emphasized teamwork and fellowship among climbers, but now has been eclipsed by a scramble for individual fame and glory.

  • The Archaeology of Athens

    In this definitive book, prominent archaeologist John M. Camp presents an up-to-date survey of the monuments of ancient Athens and Attica to create a complete archaeological tour of the area. Camp's lavishly illustrated work will appeal not only to scholars and students of Greek civilization but also to visitors exploring the ancient sites.
    "A masterful interdisciplinary compendium. . . . No volume has so successfully mined the riches of literature and history in pursuit of archeological evidence."--Publishers Weekly
    "Those seeking a straightforward, up-to-date, and wonderfully well-illustrated account of the monumental history of Athens will find themselves well served for several years to come."--Robin Osborne, Times Literary Supplement
    "One of the few must-have books for every scholar and student, every library and every individual concerned with archaeology. . . . An invaluable guide to further explorations for many visitors, students, and scholars."--Linda Jones Roccos, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
    "This up-to-date book on archaeological Athens and Attica will fit in perfectly with courses dealing with ancient Greece in general and with classical Greek art and architecture in particular."--R. Ross Holloway, Brown University

  • Overdose - How Excessive Government Regulation Stifles Pharmaceutical Innovation

    An analysis of how we regulate the pharmaceutical industry: are we protecting patients or blocking the development of useful new drugs?

    This book is the first to offer a comprehensive examination of the pharmaceutical industry by following the tortuous course of a new drug as it progresses from early development to final delivery. Richard A. Epstein looks closely at the regulatory framework that surrounds all aspects of making pharmaceutical products today, and he assesses which current legal and regulatory practices make sense and which have gone awry.

    While critics of pharmaceutical companies call for ever more stringent controls on virtually every aspect of drug development and approval, Epstein cautions that the effect of such an approach will be to stifle pharmaceutical innovation and slow the delivery of beneficial treatments to the patients who need them. The author considers an array of challenges that confront the industry--conflicts of interest among government, academe, and the drug companies; intellectual property rights that govern patents; FDA regulation; pricing disputes; marketing practices; and liability issues, including those brought to light in the recent VIOXX case. Epstein argues that to ensure the continuing creativity, efficiency, and success of the pharmaceutical industry, the best system will feature strong property rights and clearly enforceable contracts, with minimal regulatory and judicial interference.

  • God & Philosophy 2e

    In this classic work, the eminent Catholic philosopher Etienne Gilson deals with one of the most important and perplexing metaphysical problems: the relation between our notion of God and demonstrations of his existence. Gilson examines Greek, Christian, and modern philosophy as well as the thinking that has grown out of our age of science in this fundamental analysis of the problem of God.

    "[I] commend to another generation of seekers and students this deeply earnest and yet wistfully gentle little essay on the most important (and often, at least nowadays, the most neglected) of all metaphysical--and existential--questions. . . . The historical sweep is breathtaking, the one-liners arresting, and the style, both intellectual and literary, altogether engaging." --Jaroslav Pelikan, from the foreword

    "We have come to expect from the pen of M. Gilson not only an accurate exposition of the thought of the great philosophers, ancient and modern, but what is of much more importance and of greater interest, a keen and sympathetic insight into the reasons for that thought. The present volume does not fail to fulfill our expectations. It should be read by every Christian thinker." --Ralph O. Dates, America

  • The Death of the Messiah From Gethsemane to the Grave V 1 - A Commentary on the Passion Narratives in the Four Gospels

    No further information has been provided for this title.

  • The Works of Jonathan Edwards Volume 2 - Religious Affections

    This volume contains Edwards' most mature and persistent attempt to judge the validity of the religious development in eighteenth-century America known as the Great Awakening. In developing criteria for such judgment he attacked at the same time one of the fundamental questions facing all religion: how to distinguish genuine from spurious piety? The Awakening created much bitter controversy; on the one side stood the emotionalists and enthusiasts, and on the other the rationalists, for whom religion was essentially a matter of morality or good conduct and the acceptance of properly formulated doctrine. Edwards, with great analytical skill and enormous biblical learning, showed that both sides were in the wrong. He attacked both a 'lifeless morality' as too pale as to be the essence of religion, and he rejected the excesses of a purely emotional religion more concerned for sensational effects than for the inner transformation of the self, which was, for him, the centre of genuine Christianity.

  • Gospel According to Luke X-XXIV

    "The Gospel According To Luke X-XXIV" is Volume 28A in the Anchor Bible series of new book-by-book translations of the Old and New Testaments and Apocrypha. This is the conclusion of Joseph A. Fitzmyer's two-volume study of Luke.

    Included here is Fitzmyer's work on chapter 10, in which Jesus continues his journey to Jerusalem, through chapter 24, his Resurrection and appearances. The translation relies on the commentator's familiarity with the Greek and Semitic languages, while the exegesis commands a thorough knowledge of the vast cultural, technical, and linguistic information he has gathered from an international selection of Lucan literature. Each of the fifteen chapters here is studied and discussed in respect to the Gospel as a whole, Acts, and the Old Testament. The two indices refer to both volumes on Luke.

    In "joining the spirit to the letter" and scholarship to faith, Joseph A. Fitzmyer has produced a worthy successor to his "The Gospel According To Luke I-IX," which "Theological Studies" described as "extraordinarily learned and rich...a benchmark in Lucan studies."

  • The Collectible Moment - Photographs in the Norton Simon Museum

    Before the late 1960s, few museums or collectors acquired photographs or considered the medium as an art form. The moment arrived, however, when photography's profile ascended and the medium began to gain widespread acceptance in the art world as an art form engaged with issues that were central to contemporary art. This was precisely the moment of greatest growth for the collection presented here. This catalogue publishes for the first time the 548 photographs in the Norton Simon Museum of Art collection, more than 90 per cent of which were acquired during that fascinating moment of transition in the history of photography, 1969 to 1974.

    In The Collectible Moment Therese Mulligan outlines the character, quality, and importance of the Norton Simon collection, and Gloria Williams Sander explores the history of the Museum's photography department in the context of the local art organizations in general and community of photographers specifically. First-person recollections by a number of important figures in the world of photography provide immediate and vivid accounts of the period and the photo artists of this important historical moment.

  • Alighiero E Boetti

    Alighiero e Boetti (1940-1994) has emerged as one of the most significant figures of postwar European art whose practice is having an unfolding impact on younger artists. His powerful influence can be attributed to the material diversity of his work, its conceptual ingenuity and his political sensibility. His work, though usually associated with the Italian Arte Povera group and Conceptual Art, never quite fit into these contexts. Boetti ceased making Arte Povera-type objects in 1969 after a few years of association with the group, and his later choice of materials (embroidery, calligraphy, mosaic and kilims) put a gulf between his work and that of most artists of the 1970s and 1980s. Boetti had an idiosyncratic style of working, and he often collaborated with or commissioned others to execute his ideas, including his celebrated maps of the world, colourfully embroidered by women in Afghanistan and Pakistan. He tended to create several divergent bodies of work at once in series that he continued throughout his life. 'Alighiero e Boetti' is the first monograph covering the whole career of this crucial artist to be published in English. Rather than present a linear account of the artist's creative practice, the book contains linked chapters that expound the key subjects of Boetti's art, and position this work in relation to that of his European and American contemporaries.

  • Galapagos: The Islands That Changed the World

    The first complete guide to the dramatic environment, the wild inhabitants, and the human history of the enchanting Galapagos

    Rocky, fragile, beautiful, strange--the Galapagos archipelago is unlike any other place on earth. Its geology, its unique flora and fauna, and its striking role in human history intersect in surprising and dynamic ways. This book is the most wide-ranging and beautifully illustrated book available on the famous islands. Not since Darwin's Naturalist's Voyage has a book combined so much scientific and historic information with firsthand accounts that bring the Galapagos to life.
    Galapagos: The Islands That Changed the World describes how tragedy and murderous pirates curtailed settlement of the islands and how the islands' pristine nature, spectacular geology, and defining isolation inspired Darwin's ideas about evolution. The book explores the diverse land and marine habitats that shelter Galapagos species and considers the islands' importance today as a frontier for science and a refuge for true wilderness. The book's extensive gazetteer provides details about endemic plants and animals as well as travel advice about visitors' sites, diving, photography, when to go, and what to take. Vividly illustrated throughout, this guide is an indispensable reference for natural history enthusiasts, armchair travelers, and island visitors alike.

  • The New Psychology of Love

    Love ... What is it? Can we define it? What is its role in our lives? What causes love, and what dooms it? No single theory adequately answers all our questions about the nature of love, yet there are many theories that can contribute to our understanding of it. This fascinating book presents the full range of psychological theories on love - biological, taxonomical, implicit, cultural - updated with the latest research in the field. Robert Sternberg and Karin Weis have here gathered more than a dozen expert contributors to address questions about defining love, the evidence for competing theories, and practical implications. Taken together, these essays offer a comprehensive and engaging comparison of contemporary data and theories. As a follow up to The Psychology of Love, which was published in 1988 and edited by Robert Sternberg and Michael Barnes, this new collection engages with the many changes in the study of love in recent years. New theories are introduced as are modifications to existing theories. Focusing not on a single point of view but on the entire range of current theories, The New Psychology of Love provides todays definitive account of the nature of love.

  • Bisexuality in the Ancient World 2e

    In this readable and thought-provoking history of bisexuality in the classical age, Eva Cantarella draws on the full range of sources--from legal texts, inscriptions, and medical documents to poetry and philosophical literature--to reconstruct and compare the bisexual cultures of Athens and Rome.
    Reviews of the earlier edition:
    "Cantarella presents the ancient evidence in a straightforward fashion, draws insightful comparisons between heterosexuality and homosexuality, and elucidates the larger cultural context of erotic experience. With its wide scope the book speaks to the classicist, the layman with an interest in antiquity, the student of sexuality, and even to the unabashed seeker of piquant anecdotes."
    --John F. Makowski, Classical Journal
    "An important study that is destined to take its place next to the classic works of Foucault and Pomeroy."--Alan Mendelson, History: Reviews of New Books
    "Offers a valuable, close-in reassessment of intricate evidence, freshly researched, readable, and open-minded."--Alan Sinfield, Gay Times
    "This is a book I recommend for all students of sexology."--Milton Diamond, Journal of Psychology & Human Sexuality
    "Easily the best book on the topic."--John Buckler, Historian

  • The Memory of Judgement - Making Law and History in the Trails of the Holocaust

    This powerful book offers the first detailed examination of the law's response to the crimes of the Holocaust. In vivid prose it offers a fascinating study of five exemplary proceedings--the Nuremberg trial of the major Nazi war criminals, the Israeli trials of Adolf Eichmann and John Demjanjuk, the French trial of Klaus Barbie, and the Canadian trial of Holocaust denier Ernst Zundel. These trials, the book argues, were "show trials" in the broadest sense: they aimed to do justice both to the defendants and to the history and memory of the Holocaust.

    With insight Lawrence Douglas explores how prosecutors and jurors struggled to submit unprecedented crimes to legal judgment, and in so doing, to reconcile the interests of justice and pedagogy. Against the attacks of such critics as Hannah Arendt, Douglas defends the Nuremberg and Eichmann trials as imaginative, if flawed, responses to extreme crimes. By contrast, he shows how the Demjanjuk and Zundel trials turned into disasters of didactic legality, obfuscating the very history they were intended to illuminate.

    In their successes and shortcomings, Douglas contends, these proceedings changed our understandings of both the Holocaust and the legal process--revealing the value and limits of the criminal trial as a didactic tool.

  • Fashion Victims - Dress at the Court of Louis XVI and Marie-Antionette

    A thoughtful, lavishly illustrated, and highly readable account of the fabulous French fashion world in the pre-Revolutionary period

    This engrossing book chronicles one of the most exciting, controversial, and extravagant periods in the history of fashion: the reign of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette in 18th-century France. Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell offers a carefully researched glimpse into the turbulent era's sophisticated and largely female-dominated fashion industry, which produced courtly finery as well as promoted a thriving secondhand clothing market outside the royal circle. She discusses in depth the exceptionally imaginative and uninhibited styles of the period immediately before the French Revolution, and also explores fashion's surprising influence on the course of the Revolution itself. The absorbing narrative demonstrates fashion's crucial role as a visible and versatile medium for social commentary, and shows the glittering surface of 18th-century high society as well as its seedy underbelly.

    Fashion Victims presents a compelling anthology of trends, manners, and personalities from the era, accompanied by gorgeous fashion plates, portraits, and photographs of rare surviving garments. Drawing upon documentary evidence, previously unpublished archival sources, and new information about aristocrats, politicians, and celebrities, this book is an unmatched study of French fashion in the late 18th century, providing astonishing insight, a gripping story, and stylish inspiration.

  • Lementations 2 e revised

    The poetry found in the Book of Lamentations is an eloquent expression of one man's, and one nation's, despair. The poet is deep in mourning as a result of the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in the sixth century b.c.e. He looks to Israel's own sins to explain the catastrophe, and yet he recites poignant examples of Israel's suffering in wondering aloud if God has abandoned his people altogether. Thus his lament is both a confession and a prayer for hope in spite of the horrible defeat.

    Lamentations is traditionally thought to have been written by the prophet Jeremiah; today the question is whether one man wrote it or many. In his Introduction, Delbert Hillers gives the evidence against Jeremiah's authorship and suggests that the poems should be treated as an intelligible unity, most likely written by an eyewitness to the events described.

    The Book of Lamentations has been taken up through history both as poetry and as an expression of boundless grief. It has become part of the Jewish and Christian liturgies, as well as a source of comfort far beyond the time in which it was written. This commentary fills in the book's literary and historical background, and we emerge with a fresh respect for the artistry with which it was composed. The poetry itself demands this respect, with a translation here that carries the emotion and heartbreak of the original Hebrew.

    This new edition by Delbert R. Hillers is a thorough revision of his earlier Anchor Bible commentary, incorporating new literary theories and textual discoveries connected with the very latest Dead Sea Scrolls scholarship.

  • Straight Talk about Cosmetic Surgery

    The public's recent exuberance toward cosmetic surgery has spurred an unprecedented demand for appearance-changing procedures. But how can an average consumer discern the hype from solid truth? Which of the many treatments available can fulfill the promise of a more youthful look, or more beautiful skin, or a more pleasing body shape? Which procedures don't work at all? In this up-to-the-minute guide, Dr. Arthur Perry, a practising plastic surgeon for more than two decades, examines in close detail each of today's surgical and nonsurgical procedures. In everyday language, aided by more than a hundred illustrations, he assesses the benefits and potential complications of legitimate treatments. He also identifies and frankly discusses ineffective treatments. Dr. Perry's empowering book guides you through the seductive and somewhat slick world of cosmetic surgery. He offers criteria for selecting good doctors and facilities. In short, he has written an essential book for anyone who is contemplating cosmetic surgery or other skin-care procedures. It includes expert advice on: facial rejuvenation including lifts, wrinkle fillers, and peels; body contouring from liposuction and tummy tucks to breast implants, reductions, and lifts; botox and laser treatments; and, avoiding fraud and procedures that don't work.

  • Pioneers of Contemporary Glass - Highlights from the Barbara and Dennis BuBois Collection

    From small objects to large-scale sculptures, glass is an art form of captivating beauty, fragility, and diversity. This book features outstanding contemporary works in glass from the Barbara and Dennis DuBois Collection in Dallas, Texas. The catalogue examines the pioneering contributions of such international master artists as Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova, Harvey Littleton, William Morris, Tom Patti, Marc Peiser, Lino Tagliapietra, Oiva Toikka, Frantisek Vizner, and Toots Zynsky. In addition to colour reproductions of their works, the book includes an introductory essay by Cindi Strauss and individual entries by Strauss, Rebecca Elliot, and Susie Silbert that place the highlighted 25 works in context, explaining the importance of each artist's contribution to the field as well as the object's aesthetic and technical innovations. The book also includes an interview between Strauss and the collectors Barbara and Dennis DuBois.

  • You Can′t Steal a Gift - Dizzy, Clark, Milt & Nat

    In this wise, stimulating, and deeply personal book, an eminent jazz chronicler writes of his encounters with four great black musicians: Dizzy Gillespie, Clark Terry, Milt Hinton, and Nat "King" Cole. Equal parts memoir, oral history, and commentary, each of the main chapters is a minibiography, weaving together conversations Gene Lees had with the musicians and their families, friends, and associates over a period of several decades.

    Lees begins the book with an essay that tells of his introduction to the world of jazz and his reaction to racism in the United States when he emigrated from Canada in 1955. The underlying theme in his book is the impact racism had on the four musicians' lives and careers and their determination to overcome it. As Lees writes, "No white person can even begin to understand the black experience in the United States. . . . All [of the four jazz makers] are men who had every reason to embrace bitterness--and didn't."

  • Exhibiting Fashion - Before and After 1971

    With the dramatic increase in popularity of fashion exhibitions over the past decade, this groundbreaking book provides a timely look at the evolution of the practice, taking as its anchor the seminal 1971 Victoria and Albert Museum exhibition Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton, revealing it to be symptomatic of a shift in museological attitudes. The authors' combined experience of more than forty years, one in architecture and exhibition design and the other in fashion history and curating, informs their detailed account of the exhibition. Accompanied by photographs of Beaton's museum work published here for the first time, their narrative establishes a perspective from which to view working practices today.

    Research into international exhibitions from the early 20th century to the present results in some 150 stunning illustrations, including previously unpublished exhibition photographs and out-of-print documents. Through this research and the testimony of curators, exhibition designers, and mannequin manufacturers, the authors discover striking continuity in the development of the fundamental equation of mannequin, dress, and mise-en-scene. A comprehensive chronology from 1971 illustrates the exponential rise in exhibitions of Western dress on an international scale.


  • William the Conqueror

    Fifteen years in the making, a landmark reinterpretation of the life of a pivotal figure in British and European history

    In this magisterial addition to the Yale English Monarchs series, David Bates combines biography and a multidisciplinary approach to examine the life of a major figure in British and European history. Using a framework derived from studies of early medieval kingship, he assesses each phase of William's life to establish why so many trusted William to invade England in 1066 and the consequences of this on the history of the so-called Norman Conquest after the Battle of Hastings and for generations to come.

    A leading historian of the period, Bates is notable for having worked extensively in the archives of northern France and discovered many eleventh- and twelfth-century charters largely unnoticed by English-language scholars. Taking an innovative approach, he argues for a move away from old perceptions and controversies associated with William's life and the Norman Conquest. This deeply researched volume is the scholarly biography for our generation.

  • Balanced Discourses - A Bilingual Edition

    Written by the Han philosopher Xu Gan (A.D. 170-217), Balanced Discourses is an inquiry into the causes of political breakdown. It provides a unique contemporary account of the social, intellectual, and cosmological factors that Xu Gan identified as having precipitated the demise of the Han order. This edition of Zhonglun (or Balanced Discourses) contains the original Chinese text with annotations and, on facing pages, an English translation also accompanied by annotations.

    This collection of essays spans a range of topics, from Confucian cultivation to calendrical calculation. Xu's perspectives are of not only historical but also philosophical interest, for they reveal his belief in a special correlative bond that should exist between names and actualities and his understanding of what happens when that bond is broken. The translator, John Makeham, argues in his introduction that the essays display the same quality of balance that Xu Gan sees as essential to social and political equilibrium.

  • Viewing Renaissance Art

    This book focuses on the values, priorities, and motives of patrons and the purposes and functions of art works produced north and south of the Alps and in post-Byzantine Crete. It begins by considering the social range and character of Renaissance patronage and ends with a study of Hans Holbein the Younger and the reform of religious images in Basle and England.
    Viewing Renaissance Art considers a wide range of audiences and patrons from the rulers of France to the poorest confraternities in Florence. The overriding premise is that art was not a neutral matter of stylistic taste but an aspect of material production in which values were invested--whether religious, cultural, social, or political.

  • The Art Of Ecology - Writings of G. Evelyn Hutchinson

    During the twentieth century, ecology evolved from a collection of natural history facts to a rigorous, analytical discipline with a rich body of theory. No single person is more responsible for this change than G. Evelyn Hutchinson. This collection of selected writings showcases Hutchinsons dynamic and wide-ranging mind as well as his keen wit. Original essays by scientists and historians underscore the continuing relevance of Hutchinsons ideas.

  • The Art Of Japanese Craft - 1875 to the Present

    From Japan's first forays onto the international stage of world's fairs in the late 19th century to the dynamic creativity of the 1920 and 1930s, from the heady post-World War II period to the present day, Japanese crafts have exhibited a rich diversity of media and techniques. One of the first illustrated surveys in English of modern-era Japanese crafts--including ceramics, lacquerware, metalcraft, and wood--this elegant book, with 70 color illustrations, is an invaluable guide for the collector and scholar.

    Focusing on an important collection of Japanese crafts destined for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the text discusses the artists and ideas that shaped and defined the aesthetic of 20th-century Japan, noting that this nation--which so deeply appreciates and fosters its crafts traditions--hails its artists as "living national treasures." The book also includes artists' biographies and reproductions of their signatures and marks.

  • Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600-1840 4e

    This authoritative and now classic work of reference on the history of British architecture contains biographical information on some 2,000 architects who practiced in England, Scotland, and Wales from the time of Inigo Jones (1573-1652) to that of William Burn (1789-1870) and Sir Charles Barry (1795-1860). This new edition is the fourth of what began in 1954 as A Biographical Dictionary of English Architects 1600-1840. It now includes 62 newly identified architects and about 700 additional building entries.

    The dictionary lists every building of importance whose architect can be identified, together with such details as dates of erection and demolition, style, and references to illustrations and published descriptions. Besides a concise biography of each architect, the book gives, whenever possible, a brief assessment of the quality of the architect's work. All architectural books published by British architects of the period are listed by author name.

  • Extreme Beauty - The Body Transformed

    Over time and across cultures, extraordinary manipulations of the body have occurred in a continuing evolution of the concept of beauty. Fashion can be seen as the practice of some of the most extreme strategies to conform to shifting concepts of the physical ideal. Various zones of the body--the neck, the shoulders, the bust, the waist, the hips, and the feet--have been constricted, padded, truncated, or extended through subtle visual adjustments of proportion, less subtle prosthesis, and, often, deliberate physical deformation.

    This stunning book shows that an undeniable if uncanny beauty abides in the bundled cylindricality of a geisha tottering on raised geta or clogs; the tea-tray supporting bustle of an 1880s French visiting dress; the double-door expanse of eighteenth-century panniered court gowns; the bound feet and caged nails of aristocratic Manchu women; the neck-extending chokers of the Masai, of Edwardian beauties, and of John Galliano's designs for Dior; or the waist suppression of the sixteenth-century iron corsets and the cinches of early-nineteenth-century dandies. The photographs of fashion are augmented by paintings, prints, and drawings, including caricatures by Gilray, Cruikshank, Daumier, and Vernet.

  • Oceans of Wine - Madeira and the Organization of the Atlantic World 1640-1815

    This innovative book examines how, between 1640 and 1815, the Portuguese Madeira wine trade shaped the Atlantic world and American society. David Hancock painstakingly reconstructs the lives of producers, distributors, and consumers, as well as the economic and social structures created by globalizing commerce, to reveal an intricate interplay between individuals and market forces. Wine lovers and Madeira enthusiasts will enjoy 'Oceans of Wine', as will historians interested in food, colonial trade, and the history of the Atlantic region. Using voluminous archives pertaining to wine, many of them previously unexamined, Hancock offers a dramatic new perspective on the economic and social development of the Atlantic world by challenging traditional interpretations that have identified states and empires as the driving force behind trade. He demonstrates convincingly just how decentralized the early modern commercial system was, as well as how self-organized, a system that emerged from the actions of market participants working across imperial lines. The networks they formed began as commercial structures and expanded into social and political systems that were conduits not only for wine but also for ideas about reform, revolution, and independence.

  • Fourth R - Conflicts Over Religion in America′s Public Schools

    A timely and engaging story of two centuries of controversy--and sometimes violence--over prayer in America's public schools

    Contrary to popular belief, God has certainly not been kicked out of the public schools. What is banned is state-sponsored prayer, not the religious speech of the students themselves. But as news stories, political speeches, and lawsuits amply demonstrate, this approach has by no means resolved the long-standing debate over religion in public education. While some people challenge the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, with its reference to "one nation under God," others view school shootings and the terrorism of 9/11 as evidence that organized prayer must once again become part of the official school day.

    In this lively book, Joan DelFattore traces the evolution of school-prayer battles from the early 1800s, when children were beaten or expelled for refusing to read the King James Bible, to current disputes over prayer at public-school football games. Underlying these events, she shows, is a struggle to balance two of the most fundamental tenets of Americanism: majority rule and individual rights. Her highly readable book explores the enduring tension between people of good will who wish the schools to promote majoritarian beliefs, and equally well-meaning (and often religious) people who deplore any governmental influence in religious matters.

  • Brought To Light - Photography and the Invisible, 1840-1900

    A fascinating look at photography's impact on science and popular culture

    Brought to Light invites readers to step back to a time when photography, X-rays, and movies were new, when forays into the world beneath the skin or the realm beyond our everyday vision captivated scientists and the public alike. In this book, accounts of scientific experimentation blend with stories of showmanship to reveal how developments in 19th-century technology could enlighten as well as frighten and amaze. Through a series of 200 vintage images--produced by photographers, scientists, and amateur inventors--this book ultimately traces the rise of popular science.

    The images demonstrate early experiments with microscopes, telescopes, electricity and magnetism, motion studies, X-rays and radiation, and spirit photography. We learn how these pictures circulated among the public, whether through the press, world's fairs, or theaters. What started out as scientific progress, however, often took on the trappings of magic and superstition, as photography was enlisted to offer visual evidence of clairvoyance, spirits, and other occult influences.

    With beautifully reproduced plates and engaging narratives, this book embodies the aesthetic pleasures and excitement of the tale it tells.

  • The Structure of Religious Experience

    John Macmurray, one of the most brilliant of the younger English philosophers, sets forth his conception of a religion which he believes can save the world from chaos. He regards religion as having its springs in the relations between human individuals, and thinks that a religion that is not concerned with inherent social questions is no religion at all, or rather, it is a religion that has been falsified and that has lost the clue to its own meaning. According to his view, every aspect of progress, every scientific advance, the achievement of every artist and every mystic is to be tested not against a supernatural world but in the practical world of human society. It is only in this way that the efficacy of religion and its high usefulness to mankind will be able to continue in its historical importance and perhaps even create a world of peace and well-being. "Professor Macmurray is a marvelous thinker. No one excels him in the English-speaking world. . . . This book is so important every intelligent person should read it."-Boston Transcript

  • Genesis

    Genesis is Volume I in the Anchor Bible series of new book-by-book translations of the Old and New Testaments and Apocrypha. Ephraim Avigdor Speiser was University Professor and Chairman of the Department of Oriental Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Using authoritative evidence from archaeology, linguistics, and comparative religion, the author presents some startling conclusions about the first book of the Bible. He proves, for example, that the famous opening phrase, "In the beginning," is not true to the meaning of the first word, that the designation "Torah" for the Pentateuch is a misnomer, that the best-known stories of Genesis are grounded in pagan mythology. Speiser is an iconoclast in the tradition of Abraham; he exposes the false in order to help achieve truth. As he says in his introduction, he "is not motivated by mere pedantry...but by the hope that each new insight may bring us that much closer to the secret of the Bible's universal and enduring appeal."

  • Allies for Armageddon - The Relentless Rise of Christian Zionism

    Guided by a literal reading of the prophetic sections of the Bible, Christian Zionists are convinced that the world is hurtling toward a final Battle of Armageddon. They believe that the war in the Middle East is God's will for the region. In this timely book, Victoria Clark first explores the four hundred year history of this powerful political ideology, laying to rest the idea that Christian Zionism is a passing craze or the province of a lunatic fringe. Then Clark surveys the contemporary Christian Zionist scene in Israel and in the U.S., where the influence of the religious fundamentalists has never been greater. Clark engages with Christian Zionism directly, interviewing leaders, attending events, and travelling with Christian Zionists in the Holy Land. She also investigates the Christian Zionist presence in Israel. She finds that the view through the Christian Zionist lens is dangerously simple: President Bush's War on Terror is a mythic battle between good and evil, and Syria and Iran represent the powers of darkness. Such views are far from rare: an estimated fifteen to twenty million Americans share them. Almost one in three Americans believes Israel was given to the Jews by God as a prelude to the Battle of Armageddon and Jesus' Second Coming. Clark concludes with an assessment of Christian Zionists' impact on American foreign policy in the Middle East and on America's relationships with European allies since the attacks of 9/11.

  • The Bible in English: Its History And Influence

    The greatest of the earlier translators of the Bible into English, William Tyndale, died in 1536 as a martyr for his work. Immediately after him, however, translations proliferated: the Bible has now been translated into English from its original Greek and Hebrew more than three thousand times. This major book tells the extraordinary story of the Bible in England from approximately the fourth century, and its later translation into English in Britain and America to the present day. Eminent Biblical scholar David Daniell charts the profound impact successive versions of the Bible have had on the people and communities that read them. He explains the work of major translators, the history of influential translations including Coverdale's, the Geneva Bibles and the King James Bible, and how greatly Americans have contributed in the late twentieth century, especially after the American Revised Standard Version. Encompassing centuries of change, this eloquent book reveals how the endeavour of translating the Bible into English has changed religious practice, the arts, society and even the English language itself.

  • The Moral Economy: Why Good Incentives Are No Substitute for Good Citizens

    Why do policies and business practices that ignore the moral and generous side of human nature often fail?

    Should the idea of economic man--the amoral and self-interested Homo economicus--determine how we expect people to respond to monetary rewards, punishments, and other incentives? Samuel Bowles answers with a resounding "no." Policies that follow from this paradigm, he shows, may "crowd out" ethical and generous motives and thus backfire.

    But incentives per se are not really the culprit. Bowles shows that crowding out occurs when the message conveyed by fines and rewards is that self-interest is expected, that the employer thinks the workforce is lazy, or that the citizen cannot otherwise be trusted to contribute to the public good. Using historical and recent case studies as well as behavioral experiments, Bowles shows how well-designed incentives can crowd in the civic motives on which good governance depends.

  • The Drawings of Bronzino

    Drawings by the great Italian Mannerist painter and poet Agnolo Bronzino (1503-1572) are extremely rare. This important and beautiful publication brings together for the first time nearly all of the sixty drawings attributed to this leading draftsman of the 16th century. Each drawing is illustrated in colour, discussed in detail, and shown with many comparative photographs. Bronzino's technical virtuosity as a draftsman and his mastery of anatomy and perspective are vividly apparent in each stroke of the chalk, pen, or brush. The younger generations of Florentine artists particularly admired Bronzino for his technical virtuosity as a painter, and Giorgio Vasari praised him for his powers as a 'disegnatore' (designer and draftsman).

  • Chinese Sculpture - The Culture & Civilization of China Series

    The most up-to-date and detailed exploration of China's magnificent sculptural heritage

    Sculpture is becoming known as one of China's great arts. Neolithic figurines, rows upon rows of underground terra-cotta statues, exquisite bronzes, Buddhas carved in cave walls--all these are part of a vast sculptural heritage. This gorgeous book, written by a team of eminent international scholars, is the first to offer a comprehensive history of Chinese sculpture. Spanning some seven thousand years, Chinese Sculpture explores a beautiful and diverse world of objects, many of which have come to light in recent decades.

    The authors analyze and present, mostly in color, more than five hundred examples of Chinese sculpture, dividing China's rich and complex sculptural legacy into two parts--secular (tomb and mortuary art) and religious (Buddhist, Confucianist, and Daoist art). Throughout, the authors highlight the inventiveness, purposes, and brilliant execution of Chinese sculpture and comment on how the country's culture nurtured the practical and intellectual choices that shaped its sculptural traditions over the millennia.

  • Churches in Early Medieval Ireland - Architecture, Ritual and Memory

    This is the first book devoted to churches in Ireland from the arrival of Christianity in the fifth century to the early stages of the Romanesque around 1100, including those built to house treasures of the golden age of Irish art such as the Book of Kells and the Ardagh chalice. Carragain's comprehensive survey of the surviving examples forms the basis for a far-reaching analysis of why these buildings looked as they did, and what they meant in the context of early Irish society. The most immediately striking feature of these buildings is their simplicity: virtually all are rectangular in plan with a single doorway in the west wall. This was not because of ignorance of architecture elsewhere in Europe, but the result of an imperative to perpetuate a building form, derived largely from Romano-British and biblical exemplars, that had become associated with the saints who had christianized Ireland and founded its great ecclesiastical centres. These churches were associative relics: permanent stone versions of wooden churches built by the founders, embodying memories about these saints and legitimising the authority of their successors. It was primarily through rituals that these ideas were conveyed to the general population. In this book, the Irish architectural context of early medieval rituals is analysed for the first time. It also includes the most detailed analysis to date of the layout of the most important Irish ecclesiastical complexes, including Armagh, Clonmacnoise and Glendalough. At each of these sites there were ten or more churches, along with other monuments such as round towers and high crosses. O Carragain argues that some of these monumental schemes were intended to recall distant sacred topographies, especially Jerusalem and Rome. He also identifies a clear political and ideological context for the first Romanesque churches in Ireland and shows that, to a considerable extent, the Irish Romanesque represents the perpetuation of a long-established architectural tradition.

  • The Lightning Field

    Walter De Maria's Lightning Field (1977) is one of the twentieth century's most significant works of art. Situated in a remote area of desert in southwestern New Mexico, it comprises 400 polished, stainless-steel poles (spaced 220 feet apart) installed in a grid measuring one mile by one kilometer. A sculpture to be explored on foot, The Lightning Field is intended to be experienced over an extended period of time. Critic Kenneth Baker visited The Lightning Field numerous times over the course of the past 30 years in order to write this text. Inspired and challenged by this remarkable artwork, Baker speculates on the course of our contemporary human condition. But, rather than building on ideas in narrative sequence, he deploys quotation to effect multiple perspectives and points of view. Baker's citations and elegantly crafted prose are arrayed - in a metaphorical parallel to De Maria's choreographing of the vast landscape of the American Southwest - to create a compelling text.

  • The Growth of the Law

    Judge Cardozo develops further in this book the theory of law expressed in The Nature of Judicial Process. Having dealt with the question, "How do I decide a case?" he now asks, "How should I decide it?"
    "The present work glows with the same passionate sincerity that marks his judicial utterances . . . facility of expression, breadth of imagination, and lucidity of thought."--Columbia Law Review

  • Dutch Seventeenth-Century Genre Painting - In Stylistic and Thematic Evolution

    A lavishly illustrated study of the charming genre paintings of Vermeer and his contemporaries

    The appealing genre paintings of great seventeenth-century Dutch artists--Vermeer, Steen, de Hooch, Dou, and others--have long enjoyed tremendous popularity. this comprehensive book explores the evolution of genre painting throughout the Dutch Golden Age, beginning in the early 1600's and continuing through the opening years of the next century. Wayne Franits, a well-known scholar of Dutch genre painting, offers a wealth of information about these works as well as about seventeenth-century Dutch culture, its predilections, and its prejudices.

    The author approaches genre paintings from a variety of perspectives, examining their reception among contemporary audiences and setting the works in political, cultural, and economic context. The works emerge as distinctly conventional images, Franits shows, as genre artists continually replicated specific styles, motifs, and a surprisingly restricted number of themes over the course of several generations. With hundreds of illustrations and a full representation of major artists and cities where genre painting flourished, this book will delight students, scholars, and general readers alike.

  • A Biographical Disctionary of Sculptors in Britian 1660-1851

    This remarkable dictionary provides information on the work of over 3,000 sculptors working in Britain between 1660 and 1851. It is a substantially expanded edition of Gunnis's 'Dictionary of British Sculptors', the primary source for information on church monuments, portrait busts, carved fireplaces and more since publication in 1951. The editorial team, and invited experts in the field, have drawn on a mass of archival and scholarly material, including Gunnis's own extensive unpublished archive, to rewrite all the major lives of the sculptors, and to add over 1,000 new ones,. Each entry provides a brief biography of the sculptor, where possible, followed by a list of his or her known works. Each work is identified by date and location, past or present, and provenance, materials, exhibitions, known preparatory sketches and models, and bibliographical references are also recorded.

  • Encountering Genius - Jean-Antoine Houdon′s Sculpted Portraits of Benjamin Franklin

    Benjamin Franklin caused a sensation when he arrived in Paris in December 1776 seeking support for America's struggle for independence: nobles vied to entertain him, and artists scrambled to portray him. Although several artists produced sculpted busts of the visiting diplomat, perhaps the best-known image of Franklin was conceived in 1778 by Jean-Antoine Houdon, who would become the leading portrait sculptor of the period. Encountering Genius investigates the making of Houdon's marble bust of Franklin--perhaps the finest version realized--shedding new light on this enduring portrait (now in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Drawing upon dramatic and visually compelling new technical research, this publication's three essays analyze the materials and processes used in creating Houdon's sculpture, contextualize the iconic portrait, and compare the four most important versions of Houdon's sculpture side-by-side.

  • Thomas Jones 1742-1803 - An Artist Rediscovered

    Although Thomas Jones was a talented Welsh landscape artist and a pupil of Richard Wilson, there has been little published about his life and work. This comprehensive catalogue offers groundbreaking essays by leading Jones scholars and presents over 150 paintings from throughout the artist's career, many of which have never been published before. It provides for the first time a full view of this important artist and his appealing works and is the catalogue for a major exhibition in Wales and England celebrating the bicentenary of Thomas Jones's death.

  • Inventing a Nation - Washington, Adams, Jefferson

    Gore Vidal's uniquely irreverent take on America's founding fathers will enliven all future discussion of the enduring power of their nation-building ideas

    Gore Vidal, one of the master stylists of American literature and one of the most acute observers of American life and history, turns his immense literary and historiographic talent to a portrait of the formidable trio of George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson. In Inventing a Nation, Vidal transports the reader into the minds, the living rooms (and bedrooms), the convention halls, and the salons of Washington, Jefferson, Adams, and others. We come to know these men, through Vidal's splendid and percipient prose, in ways we have not up to now--their opinions of each other, their worries about money, their concerns about creating a viable democracy. Vidal brings them to life at the key moments of decision in the birthing of our nation. He also illuminates the force and weight of the documents they wrote, the speeches they delivered, and the institutions of government by which we still live. More than two centuries later, America is still largely governed by the ideas championed by this triumvirate.

  • Another City - Urban Life and Urban Spaces in the New American Republic

    In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, burgeoning American cities like New Orleans and Philadelphia seemed increasingly chaotic. Noise, odours, and a feverish level of activity on the streets threatened to overwhelm the senses. Growing populations placed new demands on every aspect of the urban landscape, from streets, parks and schools, to asylums, cemeteries, markets and waterfronts. In this unique exploration of the early history of urban architecture and design, leading architectural historian Dell Upton reveals the fascinating confluence of sociological, cultural, and psychological factors that shaped American cities in the antebellum years. Through contemporary travel accounts, diaries, and correspondence, as well as maps, architectural drawings, paintings, and prints - many previously unpublished - Upton investigates not only how buildings were designed, streets were laid out, and urban space was put to use, but also why. He offers original insights into the way cities were imagined, and an extensive selection of illustrations to recreate the various features of urban landscape in the nineteenth century.

  • The Raven King - Matthias Corvinus and the Fate of His Lost Library

    Seizing the Hungarian throne at the age of fifteen, Matthias Corvinus, 'the Raven King', was an effervescent presence on the fifteenth-century stage. A successful warrior and munificent art patron, he sought to leave as symbols of his strategic and humanist ambitions a strong, unified country, splendid palaces, and the most magnificent library in Christendom. But Hungary, invaded by the Ottoman Empire after Matthias' death in 1490, yielded its treasures and the exquisite library, witness to a golden cultural age, was dispersed across Europe. The quest to recover this collection of sumptuously illuminated manuscripts provoked and tantalised generations of princes, cardinals, collectors and scholars, and imbued Hungarians with the mythical conviction that the restoration of the lost library would seal their country's rebirth. In this thrilling and absorbing account, drawing on a wealth of original sources in several languages, Marcus Tanner charts the odyssey of the Raven King and his magnificent bequest, uncovering the remarkable story of a life and library almost lost to history.

  • The Retreat of the Elephants - An Environmental History of China

    A landmark account of China's environmental history--by an internationally pre-eminent China specialist


    This is the first environmental history of China during the three thousand years for which there are written records. It is also a treasure trove of literary, political, aesthetic, scientific, and religious sources, which allow the reader direct access to the views and feelings of the Chinese people toward their environment and their landscape.
    Elvin chronicles the spread of the Chinese style of farming that eliminated the habitat of the elephants that populated the country alongside much of its original wildlife; the destruction of most of the forests; the impact of war on the environmental transformation of the landscape; and the re-engineering of the countryside through water-control systems, some of gigantic size. He documents the histories of three contrasting localities within China to show how ecological dynamics defined the lives of the inhabitants. And he shows that China in the eighteenth century, on the eve of the modern era, was probably more environmentally degraded than northwestern Europe around this time.

    Indispensable for its new perspective on long-term Chinese history and its explanation of the roots of China's present-day environmental crisis, this book opens a door into the Chinese past.

  • Frameworks of Modern Art - Art of the Twentieth Century V 1

    This generously illustrated volume, the first in the Art of the Twentieth Century series, introduces and explores a range of contemporary issues and debates about art and its place in the wider culture today.

    The opening chapter discusses key concepts such as modernity, modernism, autonomy, spectatorship, and globalization. Four case studies follow, each devoted to a specific work of art across the span of the century: Marcel Duchamp's Bottlerack, Barnett Newman's Eve, Ana Mendieta's Silueta series, and Yarla by the Australian Aboriginal Yuendumu community. These works have been selected not only for their intrinsic interest but also for the way in which they open up wider questions of meaning and interpretation that are central to understanding twentieth-century art.

  • Walther Rathenau - The Limits of Success

    This deeply informed biography of Walther Rathenau (1867-1922) tells of a man who - both thoroughly German and unabashedly Jewish - rose to leadership in the German War-Ministry Department during the First World War, and later to the exalted position of foreign minister in the early days of the Weimar Republic. His achievement was unprecedented - no Jew in Germany had ever attained such high political rank. But Rathenau's success was marked by tragedy: within months he was assassinated by right-wing extremists seeking to destroy the newly formed Republic. Drawing on Rathenau's papers and on a depth of knowledge of both modern German and German-Jewish history, Shulamit Volkov creates a finely drawn portrait of this complex man who struggled with his Jewish identity and who treasured his 'otherness'. Volkov also places Rathenau in the dual context of Weimar Germany and of Berlin's financial and intellectual elite. Above all, she illuminates the complex social and psychological milieu of German Jewry in the period before Hitler's rise to power.

  • The Radical Camera - New York′s Photo League, 1936-1951

    Artists in 'the Photo League', active from 1936 to 1951, were known for capturing sharply revealing, compelling moments from everyday life. Their focus centred on New York City and its vibrant streets - a newsboy at work, a brass band on a bustling corner, a crowded beach at Coney Island. Though beautiful, the images harbour strong social commentary on issues of class, child labour and opportunity. 'The Radical Camera' explores the fascinating blend of aesthetics and social activism at the heart of the Photo League, tracing the group's left-leaning roots and idealism to the worker-photography movement in Europe. Influenced by mentors Lewis Hine, Berenice Abbott, and Paul Strand, artists in 'The Photo League' worked within a unique complex comprising a school, a darkroom, a gallery and a salon, in which photography was discussed as both a means for social change and an art form. The influence of 'the Photo League' artists on modern photography was enormous, ushering in the New York School. Presenting 150 works of the members of 'the Photo League' alongside complementary essays that offer new interpretations of the League's work, ideas, and pedagogy, this beautifully illustrated book features artists including Margaret Bourke-White, Sid Grossman, Morris Engel, Lisette Model, Ruth Orkin, Walter Rosenblum, Aaron Siskind, W. Eugene Smith and Weegee, among many others.

  • MCSE Designing a Windows® 2000 Directory Services Infrastructure For Dummies®

    Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599-1641) is among the greatest portrait painters of all time. The 1990s opened and closed with major exhibitions devoted to his work, and now the long-awaited catalogue raisonne of his painted oeuvre is complete.

    A native of Antwerp, Van Dyck also lived and worked for long periods in Italy and England, where his brief, productive life ended. He is best known for his work at the court of Charles I. His full-length portraits of aristocrats in the Caroline court and in Genoa, Antwerp, Brussels, and The Hague influenced the history of Western portraiture into the twentieth century in the work of John Singer Sargent. Handsomely designed and illustrated, the volume includes a reproduction of every known authentic painting by the artist as well as the provenance and the significant facts and literature on each. This catalogue raisonne is, fittingly, the collaborative work of an international team devoted to the study of this major international artist.

  • A Worldly Art - The Dutch Republic 1585-1718

    Newly independent in 1585, the increasingly prosperous and politically powerful Dutch Republic experienced a tremendous rise in the production of artwork that was unparalleled in quantity, variety, and beauty. Now back in print, this classic book (originally published in 1996) examines the countrys rich artistic culture in the seventeenth century, providing a full account of Dutch artists and patrons; artistic themes and techniques; and the political and social world in which artists worked. Distinguished art historian Mariet Westermann examines the worldly art of this time in the context of the unique society that produced it, analyzing artists choices and demonstrating how their pictures tell particular stories about the Dutch Republic, its people, and its past. More than 100 colour illustrations complement this engaging discussion of an extraordinary moment in the history of art.

  • George III - America′s Last King

    The first full new study of George III in thirty years

    The sixty-year reign of George III (1760-1820) witnessed and participated in some of the most critical events of modern world history: the ending of the Seven Years' War with France, the American War of Independence, the French Revolutionary Wars, the campaign against Napoleon Bonaparte and battle of Waterloo in 1815, and Union with Ireland in 1801. Despite the pathos of the last years of the mad, blind, and neglected monarch, it is a life full of importance and interest.

    Jeremy Black's biography deals comprehensively with the politics, the wars, and the domestic issues, and harnesses the richest range of unpublished sources in Britain, Germany, and the United States. But, using George III's own prolific correspondence, it also interrogates the man himself, his strong religious faith, and his powerful sense of moral duty to his family and to his nation. Black considers the king's scientific, cultural, and intellectual interests as no other biographer has done, and explores how he was viewed by his contemporaries. Identifying George as the last British ruler of the Thirteen Colonies, Black reveals his strong personal engagement in the struggle for America and argues that George himself, his intentions and policies, were key to the conflict.

  • Sacred Spain - Art and Belief in the Spanish World

    The art of Spain and Spanish America during the seventeenth century is overwhelmingly religious - it was intended to arouse wonder, devotion, and identification. Its forms and meanings are inextricably linked to the beliefs and religious practices of the people for whom it was made. In this groundbreaking book, scholars of art and religion look at new ways to understand the reception and use of these images in ritual and practice. As a result, the book argues for a fundamental reappraisal of the cultural role of the Church based on an analysis of the specific devotional and ritual contexts of Spanish art. Handsomely illustrated essays discuss paintings, polychrome sculptures, metalwork, and books. They call attention to the paradoxical nature of the most characteristic visual forms of Spanish Catholicism: material richness and external display as expressions of internal spirituality, strict doctrinal orthodoxy accompanied by artistic expression of surprising unconventionality, the calculated social projection of new devotional themes and the divergence of popular religious practices from officially prescribed ones.

  • Young Men and the Sea - Yankee Seafarers in the Age of Sail

    Two centuries of American maritime history, in which the Atlantic Ocean remained the great frontier.

    Two centuries of American maritime history, in which the Atlantic Ocean remained the great frontier Westward expansion has been the great narrative of the first two centuries of American history, but as historian Daniel Vickers demonstrates here, the horizon extended in all directions. For those who lived along the Atlantic coast, it was the East--and the Atlantic Ocean--that beckoned. While historical and fictional accounts have tended to stress the exceptional circumstances or psychological compulsions that drove men to sea, this book shows how normal a part of life seafaring was for those living near a coast before the mid-nineteenth century.

    Drawing on records of several thousand seamen and their voyages from Salem, Massachusetts, Young Men and the Sea offersa social history of seafaring in the colonial and early national period. In what sort of families were sailors raised? When did they go to sea? What were their chances of death? Whom did they marry, and how did their wives operate households in their absence? Answering these and many other questions, this book is destined to become a classic of American social and maritime history.

  • Picasso Looks at Degas

    The great Spanish painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) exhibited a lifelong fascination--some might say "obsession"--with the work and personality of French artist Edgar Degas (1834-1917). In this groundbreaking study, noted Degas scholar Richard Kendall and Picasso expert Elizabeth Cowling present well-documented instances of Picasso's direct responses to Degas's work, as well as more conceptual and challenging affinities between their oeuvres. Richly illustrated essays explore the artists' parallel interests in modern urban life, ballet dancers, activities such as bathing and combing the hair, photography, and the challenges of sculpture. The book also provides the first extended analysis of Picasso's engagement with Degas's art in his final years, when he acquired several of the French artist's brothel monotypes and reworked some of them in his own prints. Offering many fresh ideas and a significant amount of new material about two of the most popular and influential artists of the modern era, this handsome book promises to make a lasting contribution to the literature on both artists.

  • The Model As Muse: Embodying Fashion

    'Model as Muse' explores fashion's reciprocal relationship to iconic beauties that represent the evolution and changing face of the feminine ideal. Featuring a brief historical overview of the phenomenon of the supermodel, the book begins in the early twentieth century and continues to the present day. Dorian Leigh and Lisa Fonssagrives in the 1940s are joined in the 1950s by Dovima, Sunny Harnett, and Suzy Parker. They are followed by Jean Shrimpton and Twiggy in the early 1960s and Lauren Hutton in the 1970s. The 1980s witnessed such enduring personalities as Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Linda Evangelista, while the 1990s brought on Kate Moss, whose edgy, street-inflected style has inspired not only fashion designers, editors, stylists, and photographers, but artists such as Chuck Close and Lucien Freud. With an emphasis on styles from the 1950s onward, the book features designs from the great ready-to-wear and couture houses - Madame Gres, Christian Dior, and Balenciaga in the 1950s; Rudi Gernreich, Yves Saint Laurent, and Cardin in the 1960s; Giorgio di Sant'Angelo and Halston in the 1970s; Christian Lacroix, Versace, Comme des Garcons, and Calvin Klein in the 1980s; and, Marc Jacobs, John Galliano, and Alexander McQueen in the 1990s.

  • Reformations - Early Modern Europe, 1450-1660

    A lively, expansive history of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations and the momentous changes they set in motion

    This fast-paced survey of Western civilization's transition from the Middle Ages to modernity brings that tumultuous period vividly to life. Carlos Eire, popular professor and gifted writer, chronicles the two-hundred-year era of the Renaissance and Reformation with particular attention to issues that persist as concerns in the present day. Eire connects the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in new and profound ways, and he demonstrates convincingly that this crucial turning point in history not only affected people long gone, but continues to shape our world and define who we are today.

    The book focuses on the vast changes that took place in Western civilization between 1450 and 1650, from Gutenberg's printing press and the subsequent revolution in the spread of ideas to the close of the Thirty Years' War. Eire devotes equal attention to the various Protestant traditions and churches as well as to Catholicism, skepticism, and secularism, and he takes into account the expansion of European culture and religion into other lands, particularly the Americas and Asia. He also underscores how changes in religion transformed the Western secular world. A book created with students and nonspecialists in mind, Reformations is an inspiring, provocative volume for any reader who is curious about the role of ideas and beliefs in history.

  • Taking Measures Across the American Landscape

    Only in the past century have Americans been able to see their country from the air, to view its majestic natural and manmade topography and muse how it came to look the way it does. Landscape architect James Corner and aerial photographer Alex MacLean now present breathtaking photographs, exquisite map-drawings, and thoughtful essays that record their flights across the continental United States and express their growing understanding of the way the American landscape has been forged by various cultures in the past and what the possibilities are for its future design.

    The book traces the influence on the American landscape of the Anasazi and the Hopi in the southwest, the French along the Mississippi, the British in the east, the pioneer Americans across the plains, and the technological society across much of modern-day America. It investigates the ways in which landscape representation--particularly aerial vision--not only reflects a given reality but also constitutes a way of seeing and acting in the world. It discusses the many meanings of measure--from practical (such as solar furnaces in California) to poetic (such as raised tablets in Illinois that once formed the structure of an ancient city). And it suggests alternative possibilities for planning and taking future measures in our environment, building upon examples that range from the rectilinear survey landscape to the great transportation networks and such technological innovations as windmill fields, pivot-irrigation systems, and radio-telescope installations.

  • American Gulag - Inside U.S. Immigration Prisons

    This book is the first to explore English family portraiture in the 18th century, a varied category ranging from small-scale conversation pieces to grandiose, full-length images. Kate Retford probes this much-loved genre to trace the values and meanings behind these compositions.
    While early images by artists such as Arthur Devis depicted sitters stiffly posed, later in the century scenes of affection and intimacy were created by portraitists like Thomas Gainsborough and Joshua Reynolds. In the country-house collections, portraits first emphasized ancestry and inherited virtue, but later emphasized the domestic merits of the family. The Art of Domestic Life contributes a wealth of visual evidence to the history of the family. It offers important insights into both the innovations and traditions in family portraiture of this period, drawing on in-depth research into paintings, the lives of the sitters depicted, and the domestic spaces in which portraits were hung.Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art

  • Paracelsus - Medicine, Magic and Mission at the End of Time

    Theophrastus von Hohenheim (1493-1541), better known as Paracelsus, was a physician, natural magician, radical activist of the early Reformation, and commentator on the social and religious issues of his day. This elegantly written book is the defining account of the man known as "Paracelsus the Great."

    Drawing on the whole range of relevant manuscript and printed sources, Charles Webster considers Paracelsus's life and works, explores his advocacy for total reform of the clerical, legal, and medical professions, and describes his precise expectations for the Christian church of the future, focusing on his affinity with the spiritualist Anabaptists. The author concludes with the apocalyptic speculations of Paracelsus, who vividly portrayed the sense of endtime crisis that constituted one of the defining characteristics of his era.

  • Asymmetric Organic Synthesis with Enzymes

    This bountiful book is a comprehensive guide to the thousands of films, DVDs, and videocassettes featuring operas and opera singers from 1896 to the present. From ABC Television to Franco Zeffirelli, the encyclopedia is a storehouse of fascinating information for film and opera aficionados and casual browsers alike. Find answers to such questions as:

    * What were the first operas filmed?

    * Why did they make silent films of operas?

    * Why was a pseudo-opera written for Citizen Kane?

    * What was the title of Maria Callas's only film?
    Organized alphabetically with more than 1,900 fully cross-referenced entries, the book casts a wide net that covers not only expected topics--operas, operettas, zarzuelas, composers, singers, conductors, writers, and film directors--but also the unexpected and offbeat--animated opera, first operas on film, puppet opera films, silent films about opera, and many other lesser-known topics. Encyclopedia of Opera on Screen illuminates the many intersections between opera and film as never before.

  • Children′s World - Growing Up in Russia, 1890-1991

    A pioneering history of the experiences of children during Russia's most disrupted century

    How a country views its children reveals a great deal about that country. This landmark history of childhood in twentieth-century Russia presents an enthralling and detailed picture of a society where childhood was celebrated everywhere but children's real needs were often neglected by the state. Catriona Kelly, one of the foremost cultural historians of modern Russia, explores every aspect of children's lives, including the stresses and joys of ordinary family life, friendships, sports and games, first love, clothing, and schools. She examines the experiences of children in institutions, orphanages, and Stalin's camps, as well as the impact on their lives of such historical tragedies as revolution, civil and world war, and political purges. Based on unprecedented research in archives, hundreds of interviews, and the study of a huge range of newspapers, books, and pamphlets, the book has an immediacy which is startling. Over 100 illustrations sharpen the focus still more. Kelly weaves together information about the relationships between children and adults, prevailing ideas about childhood, and the actual experiences of children to create an unforgettable account of the intimate workings of Russian and Soviet society.

  • Berkshire - Building of England Series

    Nikolaus Pevsner described Berkshire as 'half home county, half West Country'. This revised and comprehensive guide follows its historic boundaries, including the large area transferred to Oxfordshire in the 1970s. The variety of architecture is, in consequence, broad and remarkable. Berkshire's houses range from intriguing early timber-framed dwellings to the splendors of Windsor Castle, at once England's greatest fortress and finest royal palace, through Georgian, Victorian and Arts-and-Crafts mansions of exceptional diversity and richness. Besides its numerous medieval churches, the county is a wonderful hunting ground for the Gothic Revival, including works by famous names such as Butterfield and G.E. Street. Its market towns retain much of their Georgian charm, while the prosperity of recent years has brought new waves of confident and innovative architecture. Each city, town or village is treated in a detailed gazetter. A general introduction provides a historical and artistic overview. Also included are plentiful maps and plans, over 100 new colour photographs, full indexes and an illustrated glossary. The result is both an indispensable reference work and an invaluable guide.

  • Romare Bearden, American Modernist

    Romare Bearden (1911-1988) was a modernist artist renowned for his experimental and socially conscious works. Bearden is best known for his paintings and collages but also made significant contributions to the fields of printmaking, theatrical design, film, and other visual formats. While acknowledging the artist's place in African-American art history, where he has received his primary recognition, the fourteen essays collected in this volume seek to establish Bearden's role within the broader framework of American modernism in political, social, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts.

    These essays, written by distinguished scholars, track Bearden's cultural concerns and artistic evolution, from his early political cartoons to his important relationships with preeminent practitioners in the fields of literature, music, theater, and dance. His universal themes are viewed through multiple lenses, distinguishing him as a major figure of culturally and socially engaged modernism in the 20th century.

  • Cornwall - The Buildings of England Series

    Cornwall was the first volume in the Buildings of England series, published in 1951. This extensively revised edition brings much new research to bear on the history of the county's buildings, beginning with its rich prehistoric remains and early Christian structures and monuments including numerous Celtic crosses and holy wells. The high towers of the village churches, manor houses such as Cotehele, and the distinctive white-walled cottages in the villages and fishing towns contribute to Cornwall's unique, picturesque landscape. Cornwall is home to major country houses, including the spectacular castle of St Michael's Mount, as well as the greatest English cathedral of the Victorian age at Truro. The architectural legacy of industry is also of considerable importance, from the net houses of the fishing industry to the tapering engine-house chimneys of the tin mines.

  • Buckinghamshire

    This completely new edition reveals a county of contrasts. The semi-rural suburbia of outer-Outer London, with its important early Modern Movement houses, is counterbalanced by magnificent mansions and parks, like idyllic Stowe and the Rothschilds' extravaganza at Waddesdon. The Saxon Church at Wing, the exquisite seventeenth-century Winslow Hall, and Slough's twentieth-century factories all contribute to Buckinghamshire's rich inheritance. In this new edition, the unspoilt centres of small towns, like Amersham and Buckingham, are revisited and Milton Keynes, Britain's last and most ambitious New Town, is explained and explored. The rich diversity of rural buildings, built of stone, brick, timber, and even earth, is investigated with scholarship and discrimination. This accessible and comprehensive guide is prefaced by an illuminating introduction and has many excellent illustrations, plans and maps.

  • Making Indian Law - The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory

    In 1941, after decades of struggling to hold on to the remainder of their aboriginal home, the Hualapai Indians finally took their case to the Supreme Court--and won. The Hualapai case was the culminating event in a legal and intellectual revolution that transformed Indian law and ushered in a new way of writing Indian history that provided legal grounds for native land claims. But Making Indian Law is about more than a legal decision. It's the story of Hualapai activists, and eventually sympathetic lawyers, who challenged both the Santa Fe Railroad and the U.S. government to a courtroom showdown over the meaning of Indian property rights--and the Indian past.
    At the heart of the Hualapai campaign to save the reservation was documenting the history of Hualapai land use. Making Indian Law showcases the central role that the Hualapai and their lawyers played in formulating new understandings of native people, their property, and their past. To this day, the impact of the Hualapai decision is felt wherever and whenever indigenous land claims are litigated throughout the world.

  • How Democratic is the American Constitution? 2e

    In this provocative book, one of our most eminent political scientists poses the question, "Why should Americans uphold their constitution?" The vast majority of Americans venerate the Constitution and the democratic principles it embodies, but many also worry that the United States has fallen behind other nations on crucial issues, including economic equality, racial integration, and women's rights. Robert Dahl explores this vital tension between the Americans' belief in the legitimacy of their constitution and their belief in the principles of democracy.

    Dahl starts with the assumption that the legitimacy of the American Constitution derives solely fromits utility as an instrument of democratic governance. Dahl demonstrates that, due to the context in which it was conceived, our constitution came to incorporate significant antidemocratic elements. Because the Framers of the Constitution had no relevant example of a democratic political system on which to model the American government, many defining aspects of our political system were implemented as a result of short-sightedness or last-minute compromise. Dahl highlights those elements of the American system that are most unusual and potentially antidemocratic: the federal system, the bicameral legislature, judicial review, presidentialism, and the electoral college system.

    The political system that emerged from the world's first great democratic experiment is unique--no other well-established democracy has copied it. How does the American constitutional system function in comparison to other democratic systems? How could our political system be altered to achieve more democratic ends? To what extent did the Framers of the Constitution build features into our political system that militate against significant democratic reform?
    Refusing to accept the status of the American Constitution as a sacred text, Dahl challenges us all to think critically about the origins of our political system and to consider the opportunities for creating a more democratic society.

  • The Great Partition - The Making of India and Pakistan

    The Partition of India in 1947 promised its people both political and religious freedom--through the liberation of India from British rule, and the creation of the Muslim state of Pakistan. Instead, the geographical divide brought displacement and death, and it benefited the few at the expense of the very many. Thousands of women were raped, at least one million people were killed, and ten to fifteen million were forced to leave their homes as refugees. One of the first events of decolonization in the twentieth century, Partition was also one of the most bloody.

    In this book Yasmin Khan examines the context, execution, and aftermath of Partition, weaving together local politics and ordinary lives with the larger political forces at play. She exposes the widespread obliviousness to what Partition would entail in practice and how it would affect the populace. Drawing together fresh information from an array of sources, Khan underscores the catastrophic human cost and shows why the repercussions of Partition resound even now, some sixty years later. The book is an intelligent and timely analysis of Partition, the haste and recklessness with which it was completed, and the damaging legacy left in its wake.

  • Esther

    Esther, the biblical book named after the beautiful Jewish woman chosen by the Persian King Xerxes to be queen, is a story of love, political intrigue, and religious faithfulness. Carey A. Moore combines his treatment of scholarly issues with an engaging explanation of the popular Jewish festival of Purim.
    One of three biblical books named after women (Esther, Ruth, Judith), Esther reads like a novel, with its fast-paced, action-packed story. Drawing on ancient tales of court intrigue and midrashic sources, the author captivates the reader with the story of Queen Esther, her uncle Mordecai, King Xerxes, and the the royal court's villain, Haman. The story not only entertains, it also explains the origins of the Jewish festival of Purim.
    Moore deftly deals with the scholarly issues peculiar to this book without sacrificing his sensitivity to its literary quality. The uncertainty that Esther should be included in sacred Scripture stems from its apparent lack of religious elements, its absence at Qumran, and its questionable historicity. Moore takes up these issues, carefully explaining and weighing prevailing scholarly theories before registering his own conclusions on the origin, date, and purpose of the book of Esther.

  • Clothing Art: The Visual Culture of Fashion 1600-1914

    An entirely new way of looking at the history of fashion through the eyes of artists

    There have always been important links between art and clothing. Artists have documented the ever-evolving trends in fashion, popularized certain styles of dress, and at times even designed fashions. This is the first book to explore in depth the fascinating points of contact between art and clothing, and in doing so it constructs a new and innovative history of dress in which the artist plays a central role.

    Aileen Ribeiro provides an illuminating account of the relationship between artists and clothing from the 17th century, when a more complex and sophisticated attitude to dress first appeared, to the early 20th century, when the boundaries between art and fashion became more fluid: haute couture could be seen as art, and art used textiles and clothes in highly imaginative ways. Her narrative encompasses such themes as the ways in which clothing has helped to define the nation state; how masquerade and dressing up were key subjects in art and life; and how, while many artists found increasing inspiration in high fashion, others became involved in designing "artistic" and reform dress. Sumptuously illustrated, Clothing Art also delves into the ways in which artists represent the clothes they depict in their work, approaches which range from photographic detail, through varying degrees of imaginative reality, to generalized drapery.

  • Nobody′s Property - Art, Land, Space, 2000-2010

    This generously illustrated volume surveys a new chapter in the history of environmental art, one in which space, geopolitics, human relations, urbanism, and utopian dreamwork play as important a role as, if not more than, raw earth. Discussed are nine case studies by seven artists and two artist teams - Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, Francis Alys, Yael Bartana, Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, Emre Huner, Andrea Geyer, Matthew Day Jackson, Lucy Raven, and Santiago Sierra. While some of these artists explore historical and symbolic configurations of space, others parse the social, legal, and economic conditions of specific land-sites, including the Navajo Nation, the island of Vieques, the border town of Juarez, and the cities of Tongling, Jerusalem, and Beirut. By no means confined to the displacement of matter, these artists employ a wide range of media, such as performance, animation, assemblage, and photography. An intriguing introductory text offers a historical context for the works in Nobodys Property and provides a broad overview of the projects involved. Also included are an essay on the relationship between historical land art and new media technologies; the transcript of a roundtable discussion; and essays by various contributors on the featured works of art.

  • Jewish Life in Small-Town America - A History

    In this book, Lee Shai Weissbach offers the first comprehensive portrait of small-town Jewish life in America. Exploring the history of communities of 100 to 1000 Jews, the book focuses on the years from the mid-nineteenth century to World War II. Weissbach examines the dynamics of 490 communities across the United States and reveals that smaller Jewish centers were not simply miniature versions of larger communities but were instead alternative kinds of communities in many respects.
    The book investigates topics ranging from migration patterns to occupational choices, from Jewish education and marriage strategies to congregational organization. The story of smaller Jewish communities attests to the richness and complexity of American Jewish history and also serves to remind us of the diversity of small-town society in times past.

  • Elephants on the Edge - What Animals Teach Us about Humanity

    Drawing on accounts from India to Africa and California to Tennessee, and on research in neuroscience, psychology, and animal behaviour, G. A. Bradshaw explores the minds, emotions, and lives of elephants. Wars, starvation, mass culls, poaching, and habitat loss have reduced elephant numbers from more than ten million to a few hundred thousand, leaving orphans bereft of the elders who would normally mentor them. As a consequence, traumatized elephants have become aggressive against people, other animals, and even one another; their behaviour is comparable to that of humans who have experienced genocide, other types of violence, and social collapse. By exploring the elephant mind and experience in the wild and in captivity, Bradshaw bears witness to the breakdown of ancient elephant cultures. All is not lost. People are working to save elephants by rescuing orphaned infants and rehabilitating adult zoo and circus elephants, using the same principles psychologists apply in treating humans who have survived trauma. Bradshaw urges us to support these and other models of elephant recovery and to solve pressing social and environmental crises affecting all animals, human or not.

  • Hubbub - Filth, Noise and Stench in England 1600-1770

    Modern city-dwellers suffer their share of unpleasant experiences - traffic jams, noisy neighbours, pollution, food scares - but urban nuisances of the past existed on a different scale entirely, as this book explains in vivid detail. Focusing on offences to the eyes, ears, noses, taste buds, and skin of inhabitants of England's pre-Industrial Revolution cities, Hubbub transports us to a world in which residents were scarred by smallpox, refuse rotted in the streets, pigs and dogs roamed free, and food hygiene consisted of little more than spit and polish. Through the stories of a large cast of characters from varied walks of life, the book compares what daily life was like in different cities across England from 1600 to 1770. Using a vast array of sources, from novels to records of urban administration to diaries, Emily Cockayne populates her book with anecdotes from the quirky lives of the famous and the obscure - all of whom confronted urban nuisances and physical ailments. Each chapter addresses an unpleasant aspect of city life (noise, violence, mouldy food, smelly streets, poor air quality), and the volume is enhanced with a rich array of illustrations. Awakening both our senses and our imaginations, Cockayne creates a nuanced portrait of early modern English city life, unparalleled in breadth and unforgettable in detail.

  • Policing Stalin′s Socialism - Repression and Social Order in the Soviet Union 1924-1953

    'Policing Stalin's Socialism' is one of the first books to emphasize the importance of social order repression by Stalin's Soviet regime in contrast to the traditional emphasis of historians on political repression. Based on extensive examination of new archival materials, David Shearer finds that most repression during the Stalinist dictatorship of the 1930s was against marginal social groups such as petty criminals, deviant youth, sectarians, and the unemployed and unproductive. It was because Soviet leaders regarded social disorder as more of a danger to the state than political opposition that they instituted a new form of class war to defend themselves against this perceived threat. Despite the combined work of the political and civil police the efforts to cleanse society failed; this failure set the stage for the massive purges that decimated the country in the late 1930s.

  • Burdock

    In Burdock, Janet Malcolm, who has been called "the most morally illuminating literary journalist in the country," illuminates through photography her fascination with the natural world

    Over the course of three summers in New England, Malcolm gathered leaves of the burdock plant, a "large rank weed" with medicinal properties "that grows along roadsides and in waste places and around derelict buildings." Influenced by Richard Avedon's unsparing portraits of famous people, Malcolm is drawn to "uncelebrated leaves" on which "life has left its mark," through the ravages of time, weather, insects, or blight. In her introduction, Malcolm reminds us that writers like Chekhov and Hawthorne have used burdock "to denote ruin and desolation." And yet, for Malcolm, Burdock is an homage to the botanical illustrators who recognized "the gorgeousness of the particulars of the things that are alive in the world."

    "Burdock consists of a series of large color photographs portraying a single, unusual kind of leaf in various stages of growth and decay. As such, it is a work of botanical and indeed philosophical interest as well as an art book. Like all of Malcolm's work, this project entails looking with a steely but sympathetic and extremely intelligent eye at the world around her, zeroing in on the oddities that others might miss and using them as clues through which she solves the larger mystery."--Wendy Lesser

    Malcolm's leaves will be shown at the Lori Bookstein Fine Arts Gallery in New York, September 9-October 11, 2008.

    "Looking at natural forms close up is an exercise in awe."--Janet Malcolm

  • Painting the Word - Christian Pictures & their Meanings

    Christianity is another country, says John Drury, and we need to familiarize ourselves with it in order to understand the universal meaning of its art. In this beautifully written book, Drury, an Anglican priest and theologian, looks at religious paintings through the ages and presents them to us in a fresh way--as works filled with passion, stories, and meaning. They become the poetry of such eternal human concerns as birth, death, sacrifice, love, and moral goodness and failure.

    Drury points out the religious meanings in paintings that range from works by Piero della Francesca to those by Velazquez. In each case he views the whole picture--its composition, color, drawing, figures, and even architecture--and shows how it creates a religious image that addresses the spectator as a spiritual human being. Drury also provides a historical context for the works, comparing our perception with the perceptions of, for example, the medieval monarch or the Renaissance merchant who first commissioned the work. He examines how these pictures are able to speak to audiences across time and space, and in the process he allows us to respond to them at a more imaginative, empathetic level.

  • Playing With Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage

    Human heads on animal bodies, people in fanciful landscapes, faces that are deftly morphed into common household objects - these are among the Victorian experiments in photo collage seen and explained in this marvelous book. With sharp wit and dramatic shifts of scale, these images flouted the serious conventions of photography in the 1860s and 1870s. Often made by women for albums, they reveal the educated minds and accomplished hands of their makers, taking on the new theory of evolution, addressing the changing role of photography, and challenging the strict conventions of aristocratic society. Although these photo collages may seem wonderfully odd to us now, the authors argue that they are actually perfectly in keeping with the Victorian sensibility that embraced juxtaposition and variety. This delightful book, the first to examine comprehensively the little-known phenomenon of Victorian photo collage, presents imagery that has rarely - and, in many cases, never - been displayed or reproduced. Illuminating text provides a history of Victorian photo collage albums, identifies the common motifs found in them, and demonstrates the distinctly modern character of the medium, which paved the way for the future avant-garde potential of both photography and collage.

  • Ancient Greece - From Prehistoric to Hellenistic Times, Second Edition

    In this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C.E.. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. Now in its second edition, this classic work features new maps and illustrations, a new introduction, and updates throughout.

  • The Town House in Georgian London

    This book takes a fresh look at a familiar building type - the town house in eighteenth-century London - and investigates the circumstances in which individuals made decisions about living in London, and particularly about their West End house. It uncovers what occupants of town houses thought about their property, why and how they chose or built it, paid for it, used it, decorated it and sold or bequeathed it, and what uses it had for them beyond simply accommodation. For the first time, this book takes as a starting point the houseowner, occupant or architect's client, and through extensive and original use of anecdotal evidence, opens up a wealth of unforeseen values, uses and connections attaching to the house. It offers a serious analysis of clients wants and needs, and describes the house's function within and impact upon people's lives, concerns and aspirations. Stewart shows how the use of the house comprised much more than how life was lived in it on a day-to-day basis, or even how it served special occasions, and included how it functioned in the context of family relations, financial, legal and property transactions, and the market, as well as in the construction of personal identity. At the same time as exploring private perceptions and expectations, Stewart reveals the negative press attention the town house received in its own time. The house unsettled many eighteenth-century observers, and Stewart analyses an unprecedented range of evidence, to demonstrate how the house was associated with notions of transience, changeability, imperfection, luxury, and selfishness, which resulted in its characterization as inconsequential, inconstant, insubstantial, intemperate and ultimately emasculate. By stepping away from conventional tales of economics, materials, or style, and into the previously unexplored world of the houseowner, the book offers an entirely original reading of a familiar building.

  • Fashion at the Edge - Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness

    Recent experimental fashion has a dark side, a preoccupation with representations of death, trauma, alienation, and decay. This intriguing book looks closely at this strand of fashion design in the 1990s, exploring what its disturbing themes tell us about consumer culture and contemporary anxieties. Caroline Evans analyzes the work of experimental designers, the images of fashion photographers, and the spectacular fashion shows that developed in the final decade of the twentieth century to arrive at a new understanding of fashion's dark side and what it signifies.
    Fashion at the Edge considers a range of cutting-edge contemporary fashion in unprecedented depth and detail, including the work of such current designers as John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, Hussein Chalayan, and Viktor & Rolf. Contrasting images by photographers like Steven Meisel, Nick Knight, and Juergen Teller are also reviewed. Drawing on diverse perspectives from Marx to Walter Benjamin, Evans shows that fashion stands at the very center of the contemporary, and that it voices some of Western culture's deepest concerns.

  • Frankenstein′s Footsteps - Science, Genetics & Popular Culture

    Mary Shelley's Frankestein, a tale crafted two centuries ago 'to awaken thrilling horror', is a story that speaks to deep fears and desires that lie at the heart of our responses to biological progress. Tracing the history of the development of biological science and how it has been received and understood by the public over two centuries, Turney's intriguing book argues that the Frankenstein story governs much of today's debate about the onrushing new age of biotechnology. 'a serious and fascinating contribution to cultural history' Mary Warnock, Times Higher Education Supplement 'This is a fascinating book, interweaving accounts of literature and popular culture with accounts of the growth of modern biology.' John Polkinghorne, University of Cambridge. 'This is an important book - elegantly written - as it helps us to understand public attitudes to biological research.' Lewwis Wolpert, Times 'Combining the research skills of an historian with the writing skills of a fine journalist, Turney offers a penetrating history that sheds light on contemporary anxieties of the biotechnological age.' Dorothy Nelkin, New York University ' ... a large and compelling subject, of surpassing interest at the present time and likely to remain so for many years to come.' James Secord, University of Cambridge Winner of the British Medical Association Book Prize, 1999. Jon Turney, formerly science editor of the Times Higher Education Supplement, is now senior lecturer in science communication in the department of science and technology studies at University College London.

  • A Creative Artist′s Guide to the Art of Law

    The essential guide to intellectual property law for all media producers--students and teachers, amateurs and professionals

    In today's complex media environment, aspiring filmmakers and new media artists are as vulnerable as swimmers in shark-infested waters. This user-friendly guide supplies creative artists with the essential legal concepts needed to swim safely with lawyers, agents, executives, and other experts in intellectual property and business law.

    How do I copyright my screenplay? How can I clear rights for my film project? What can I do to avoid legal trouble when I produce my mockumentary? How do I ascertain whether a vintage novel is in the public domain? Is the trademark I've invented for my production company available? What about copyright and trademark rights overseas? If I upload my film to YouTube, do I give up any rights?

    Bill Seiter and Ellen Seiter answer these questions and countless others while also demystifying the fundamental principles of intellectual property. Clear and thorough, this plain-spoken and practical guide is essential for anyone seeking to navigate the rapidly changing media environment of today.

  • The Deadly Dinner Party - and Other Medical Detective Stories

    Picking up where Berton Roueche's 'The Medical Detectives' left off, 'The Deadly Dinner Party' presents fifteen edge-of-your-seat medical detective stories written by a practicing physician. Award-winning author Jonathan Edlow, M.D., shows the doctor as detective and the epidemiologist as elite sleuth in stories that are as gripping as the best thrillers. In these stories a notorious stomach bug turns a suburban dinner party into a disaster that almost claims its host; a diminutive woman routinely eats more than her football-playing boyfriend but continually loses weight; a young executive is diagnosed with lung cancer, yet the tumors seem to wax and wane inexplicably. Written for the lay person who wishes to better grasp how doctors decipher the myriad clues and puzzling symptoms they often encounter, each story presents a very different case where doctors must work to find the accurate diagnosis before it is too late. Edlow uses his unique ability to relate complex medical concepts in a writing style that is clear, engaging and easily understandable. The resulting stories both entertain us and teach us much about medicine, its history and the subtle interactions among pathogens, humans, and the environment.

  • Locating Renaissance Art - Renaissance Art Reconsidered

    Renaissance art history is traditionally identified with Italian centers of production, and Florence in particular. Instead, this book explores the dynamic interchange between European artistic centers and artists and the trade in works of art. It also considers the impact of differing locations on art and artists and some of the economic, political, and cultural factors crucial to the emergence of an artistic center.
    During c.1420-1520, no city or court could succeed in isolation and so artists operated within a network of interests and local and international identities. The case studies presented in this book portray the Renaissance as an exciting international phenomenon, with cities and courts inextricably bound together in a web of economic and political interests.

  • Hannibal - A Hellenistic Life

    If history is written by the victors, can we really know Hannibal, whose portrait we see through the eyes of his Roman conquerors?

    Hannibal lived a life of incredible feats of daring and survival, massive military engagements, and ultimate defeat. A citizen of Carthage and military commander in Punic Spain, he famously marched his war elephants and huge army over the Alps into Rome's own heartland to fight the Second Punic War. Yet the Romans were the ultimate victors. They eventually captured and destroyed Carthage, and thus it was they who wrote the legend of Hannibal: a brilliant and worthy enemy whose defeat represented military glory for Rome.

    In this groundbreaking biography Eve MacDonald expands the memory of Hannibal beyond his military feats and tactics. She considers him in the wider context of the society and vibrant culture of Carthage which shaped him and his family, employing archaeological findings and documentary sources not only from Rome but also the wider Mediterranean world of the third century B.C. MacDonald also analyzes Hannibal's legend over the millennia, exploring how statuary, Jacobean tragedy, opera, nineteenth-century fiction, and other depictions illuminate the character of one of the most fascinating military personalities in all of history.

  • Gospel According to Luke I-IX

    In this first of two volumes on the Gospel According to Luke, Joseph A. Fitzmyer provides an exhaustive introduction, a definitive new translation, and extensive notes and commentary on Luke's Gospel. Fitzmyer brings to the task his mastery of ancient and modern languages, his encyclopedic knowledge of the sources, and his intimate acquaintance with the questions and issues occasioned by the third Synoptic Gospel.

    Luke's unique literary and linguistic features, its relation to the other Gospels and the book of Acts, and its distinctive theological slant are discussed in detail by the author. The Jesus of Luke's Gospel speaks to the Greco-Roman world of first-century Christians, giving the followers of Jesus a reason for remaining faithful. Fitzmyer's exposition of this Gospel helps modern-day Christians hear the Good News afresh.

  • Habakkuk

    The book of Habakkuk (one of the twelve Minor Prophets) is an intensely personal testimony played out against a highly political backdrop. Writing as his land and his fellow Israelites were being invaded and plundered by the Chaldeans, Habakkuk questions God's actions with a passion equal to Job's. Habakkuk wonders, how can a God who is just and compassionate allow his people to be slaughtered? In trying to punish the Israelites and right the wrongs of his people, why did God choose the savage, infinitely more wicked Chaldeans as his instrument? The puzzles Habakkuk contemplates will stir the hearts and minds of anyone who has ever wrestled with the evils of existence. Francis I. Andersen, a well-known authority on the Minor Prophets and acclaimed for his pioneering work in the study of biblical Hebrew, examines Habakkuk both as a work of sophisticated theological inquiry and as an artistic creation. The result is a book that illuminates the nuances of the text and brings to life the culture and values of the ancient Israelites through a compelling portrait of one the Bible's most fascinating and most elusive prophets.

  • Lee Lozano - Drawings

    Lee Lozano (1930-1999) brought a potent voice to the 1960s New York art scene. Equipped with an extraordinary intellectual reach and demonstrating an unusually expressive and mature sexuality, Lozano's art--which includes paintings, drawings, and conceptual works--is as fresh today as it was more than 40 years ago.
    This handsome book presents selections of the artist's early narrative and figurative drawings dating from 1960 to '64. It is the first publication focusing on Lozano's drawings, and all of the featured works are previously unpublished. Her drawings can be exacting, demanding, and formally refined, such as her sexually charged depictions of tools, or freer gestural drawings using graphite with splashes of crayon color. Lozano also created text pieces that are part diary and part social chronicle. Conceived as a sort of artist's sketchbook, the publication is completed by selections from the artist's own diaries, which reveal her incredible wit, anger, intelligence, and struggles.
    Lee Lozano: Drawings leaves no doubt of how prescient her work has proven to be and why she is an artist who is attracting a great deal of attention today.

  • Two Lives - Gertrude and Alice

    Unlocking the truth of the mystifying relationship between Gertrude Stein, brilliant and affable, and her brooding companion, Alice B. Toklas

    "How had the pair of elderly Jewish lesbians survived the Nazis?" Janet Malcolm asks at the beginning of this extraordinary work of literary biography and investigative journalism. The pair, of course, is Gertrude Stein, the modernist master "whose charm was as conspicuous as her fatness" and "thin, plain, tense, sour" Alice B. Toklas, the "worker bee" who ministered to Stein's needs throughout their forty-year expatriate "marriage." As Malcolm pursues the truth of the couple's charmed life in a village in Vichy France, her subject becomes the larger question of biographical truth. "The instability of human knowledge is one of our few certainties," she writes.

    The portrait of the legendary couple that emerges from this work is unexpectedly charged. The two world wars Stein and Toklas lived through together are paralleled by the private war that went on between them. This war, as Malcolm learned, sometimes flared into bitter combat.

    Two Lives is also a work of literary criticism. "Even the most hermetic of [Stein's] writings are works of submerged autobiography," Malcolm writes. "The key of 'I' will not unlock the door to their meaning--you need a crowbar for that--but will sometimes admit you to a kind of anteroom of suggestion." Whether unpacking the accessible Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, in which Stein "solves the koan of autobiography," or wrestling with The Making of Americans, a masterwork of "magisterial disorder," Malcolm is stunningly perceptive.

    Praise for the author:

    "[Janet Malcolm] is among the most intellectually provocative of authors . . .able to turn epiphanies of perception into explosions of insight."--David Lehman, Boston Globe

    "Not since Virginia Woolf has anyone thought so trenchantly about the strange art of biography."--Christopher Benfey

  • Lina Bo Bardi

    One of the most important architects of the twentieth century, Lina Bo Bardi (1914-1992) was remarkably prolific and intriguingly idiosyncratic. A participant in the efforts to reshape Italian culture in her youth, Bo Bardi immigrated to Brazil in 1946, where her practice evolved within the social and cultural realities of her adopted country. While she continued to work with industrial materials, she added simple building techniques and naturalistic forms to her designs, striving to create large, multiuse spaces that promoted public life.

    Lina Bo Bardi is the first comprehensive study of the architect's life and work. Author Zeuler Lima, the leading authority on Bo Bardi, presents her activities on two continents, examining how ethical and social considerations influenced her intellectual engagement with modern architecture and providing an indispensable guide to her writings and her experimental, iconic designs.

  • The Emperor′s Private Paradise - Treasures from the Forbidden City

    For centuries, China's Forbidden City has captured the world's imagination. Parts of the Forbidden City have been open to the public since 1925, and nearly 8 million tourists flock there annually. Yet the elegant, intimate Qianlong Garden - itself within a mini-Forbidden City inside the Forbidden City - has remained sequestered from public view. Dating from the eighteenth century, the Qianlong Garden was built as a retirement retreat for its namesake emperor, a visionary patron of the arts who designed his garden to reflect a perfect union of art, architecture, and nature. Now undergoing restoration as a result of a groundbreaking international collaboration, it is intended to be fully open to visitors in 2019. Well in advance of this opening date, The Emperors Private Paradise gives an in-depth analysis of the garden - the most refined and elegant of imperial Chinese gardens, and containing some of the most extravagant imperial interiors still existing. This volume also interprets the many artworks commissioned for the garden by the emperor as expressions of ancient cultural values and new perspectives. Essays offering an overview of the history of Chinese gardens and the extraordinary reign of the Qianlong emperor complement and contextualize the importance of the Qianlong Garden and its artworks. This lavishly illustrated volume is published to accompany an unprecedented exhibition of ninety objects from the Qianlong Garden, many of them never seen before and including superlative examples of Qing murals, paintings, wall coverings, furniture, architectural elements, and jades. By illuminating this little-known yet architecturally significant area of the Forbidden City, this volume represents a major contribution to the fields of Chinese art, history, architecture, and gardens.

  • Belarus - The Last European Dictatorship

    This book is the first in English to explore both Belarus's complicated road to nationhood and to examine in detail its politics and economics since 1991, the nation's first year of true independence. Andrew Wilson focuses particular attention on Aliaksandr Lukashenka's surprising longevity as president, despite human rights abuses and involvement in yet another rigged election in December 2010.

    Wilson looks at Belarusian history as a series of false starts in the medieval and pre-modern periods, and at the many rival versions of Belarusian identity, culminating with the Soviet Belarusian project and the establishment of Belarus's current borders during World War II. He also addresses Belarus's on-off relationship with Russia, its simultaneous attempts to play a game of balance in the no-man's-land between Russia and the West, and how, paradoxically, Belarus is at last becoming a true nation under the rule of Europe's "last dictator."

  • Arts of Ancient Vietnam - From River Plain to Open Sea

    Once a strategic trading post that channelled the flow of riches and ideas among countries situated along the South China Sea and places as far away as India and Rome, Vietnam has a fascinating history and an artistic heritage to match it. This lavishly produced catalogue will help introduce English-speaking audiences to Vietnam's amazing body of artwork, ranging from the first millennium B.C. to the 18th century. The authors begin by discussing, for example, the elegant burial jars, iron axes, bronze artefacts, and jewellery of the early Sa Huynh culture; the bronze ritual drums of the Dong Son; and, the jewelled gold pieces, excavated from the walled center of Oc Eo in the kingdom of Fu Nan. New scholarship investigates the trade in gold and Chinese ceramics between Cham and the Philippine kingdom of Butuan. The final section is devoted to art from Hoi An, once a major international port. Of note are the ceramic wares produced in northern and central Vietnam from the 16th to 18th centuries.

  • Art for All - British Posters for Transport

    In 1908 London Underground began a comprehensive publicity programme that became one of the most successful, adventurous and best-sustained promotional operations ever attempted. The posters commissioned not only encouraged travel on the capital's burgeoning public transport system; they also helped to foster a civic identity for metropolitan London. The four national rail lines created in 1923, inspired by this example, created their own campaigns. This richly illustrated volume celebrates the designs, highlighting works that are among the triumphs of twentieth-century poster art. Designed to accompany an exhibition at the Yale Center for British Art, 'Art for All' features more than one hundred works executed for the Underground and the railways. The exhibition and catalogue will explore the evolution of transport posters in twentieth-century Britain. It will feature the career of E. McKnight Kauffer, perhaps the greatest of these poster artists; the role of women designers; the printing techniques that brought the designs to life; and, the strategies of display developed by the transport systems. Both a visual delight and a work of scholarship, 'Art for All' pays tribute to these extraordinary exploits in public design. Exhibition: Yale Center for British Art, 27 May - 15 August 2010.

  • Georgian London

    In this classic of English architectural history (first published more than half a century ago), John Summerson provides a perceptive and highly readable account of a major building period in the history of London. Encompassing the architecture of the capital from the Great Fire of 1666 through the city's early nineteenth-century expansion, the book remains an indispensable guide to the genesis and development of Georgian London. Summerson examines the way in which building was conditioned by social, economic, and financial circumstances and discusses some of Britain's most important buildings and their architects.

    While Summerson's text is essentially unchanged in this edition, it has been corrected in the light of new research, expanded to include a few significant buildings that were originally overlooked, and enhanced with new illustrations. The Appendix of surviving Georgian buildings has also been carefully updated.

  • Primo Levi - The Matter of a Life

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, the first intellectual biography of Primo Levi to describe the intersection of his roles as both chemist and writer

    In 1943, twenty-four-year-old Primo Levi had just begun a career in chemistry when, after joining a partisan group, he was captured by the Italian Fascist Militia and deported to Auschwitz. Of the 650 Italian Jews in his transport, he was one of fewer than 25 who survived the eleven months before the camp's liberation. Upon returning to his native Turin, Levi resumed work as a chemist and was employed for thirty years by a company specializing in paints and other chemical coatings. Yet soon after his return to Turin, he also began writing--memoirs, essays, novels, short stories, poetry--and it is for this work that he has won international recognition. His first book, If This Is a Man, issued in 1947 after great difficulty in finding a publisher, remains a landmark document of the twentieth century. Berel Lang's groundbreaking biography shines new light on Levi's role as a major intellectual and literary figure--an important Holocaust writer and witness but also an innovative moral thinker in whom his two roles as chemist and writer converged, providing the "matter" of his life. Levi's writing combined a scientist's attentiveness to structure and detail, an ironic imagination that found in all nature an ingenuity at once inviting and evasive, and a powerful and passionate moral imagination. Lang's approach provides a philosophically acute and nuanced analysis of Levi as thinker, witness, writer, and scientific detective.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • Empire: The Russian Empire and Its Rivals

    How does one empire differ from another? Why do empires rise and fall? What has made empires flourish in some eras and regions of the world but not in others? In this broad and ambitious book, Dominic Lieven explores the place and meaning of empire from ancient Rome to the present.
    The central focus of the book is Russia and the rise and fall of the Tsarist and the Soviet Empires. The overwhelming majority of works on empire concentrate on the European maritime powers. Lieven's comparative approach highlights the important role played by Russia in the expansion of Europe and its rise to global dominance. The book contrasts the nature, strategies, and fate of empire in Russia with that of its major rivals, the Habsburg, Ottoman, and British empires, and considers a broad range of other cases from ancient China and Rome to the present-day United States, Indonesia, India, and the European Union.
    Many of the dilemmas of empire persist in today's world, and Lieven throws new light on some of the most intractable current examples, including the crisis in the former Soviet Union, the troubles in Ulster, and ethnic cleansing in the Balkans. This major examination of the imperial experience presents history on the grandest scale, combining formidable erudition with stimulating readability.

  • Why Trilling Matters

    Lionel Trilling, regarded at the time of his death in 1975 as America's preeminent literary critic, is today often seen as a relic of a vanished era. His was an age when literary criticism and ideas seemed to matter profoundly in the intellectual life of the country. In this eloquent book, Adam Kirsch shows that Trilling, far from being obsolete, is essential to understanding our current crisis of literary confidence - and to overcoming it. By reading Trilling primarily as a writer and thinker, Kirsch demonstrates how Trilling's original and moving work continues to provide an inspiring example of a mind creating itself through its encounters with texts. 'Why Trilling Matters' introduces all of Trilling's major writings and situates him in the intellectual landscape of his century, from Communism in the 1930s to neoconservatism in the 1970s. But Kirsch goes deeper, addressing today's concerns about the decline of literature, reading, and even the book itself, and finds that Trilling has more to teach us now than ever before. As Kirsch writes, 'Trilling's essays are not exactly literary criticism' but, like all literature, 'ends in themselves'.

  • Gather The Fragments - The Andrews Shaker Collection

    Struck by the beauty of every visible object in a Shaker kitchen they chanced to visit in 1923, young Edward Deming Andrews and his wife, Faith Young Andrews, embarked on a collection that became the passion of their lives. During the following decades, at a time when the art and artifacts of the Shakers were considered "low" art and unworthy of collecting or exhibiting, the Andrewses energetically collected objects, studied sources, and eventually mounted exhibits and published books on Shaker culture.

    This beautiful book is the first to document their unparalleled collection, presenting some 600 photographs, most never before published. In addition, the book brings to light the extraordinary story of the Andrewses' collecting and scholarship, their relationships with members of the United Society of Believers (commonly called Shakers) and with important New York City art-world figures of the 1930s, as well as their contributions toward the birth of the field of Shaker Studies. More than passionate collectors, Edward and Faith Andrews were intent on saving a distinct culture, and their accomplishment was to preserve for future generations the most comprehensive body of knowledge ever assembled about the Shakers.

  • Writings on Art

    The first collection of Mark Rothko's writings, which range the entire span of his career

    While the collected writings of many major 20th-century artists, including Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell, and Ad Reinhardt, have been published, Mark Rothko's writings have only recently come to light, beginning with the critically acclaimed The Artist's Reality: Philosophies of Art. Rothko's other written works have yet to be brought together into a major publication. Writings on Art fills this significant void; it includes some 90 documents--including short essays, letters, statements, and lectures--written by Rothko over the course of his career. The texts are fully annotated, and a chronology of the artist's life and work is also included.

    This provocative compilation of both published and unpublished writings from 1934--69 reveals a number of things about Rothko: the importance of writing for an artist who many believed had renounced the written word; the meaning of transmission and transition that he experienced as an art teacher at the Brooklyn Jewish Center Academy; his deep concern for meditation and spirituality; and his private relationships with contemporary artists (including Newman, Motherwell, and Clyfford Still) as well as journalists and curators.

    As was revealed in Rothko's The Artist's Reality, what emerges from this collection is a more detailed picture of a sophisticated, deeply knowledgeable, and philosophical artist who was also a passionate and articulate writer.

  • Arts of the City Victorious - Islamic Art and Architecture in Fatimid North Africa and Egypt

    This is the first book-length study of the art and architecture of the Fatimids, the Ismaili Shi'i dynasty that ruled in North Africa and Egypt from 909 to 1171. The Fatimids are most famous for founding the city of al-Qahira (Cairo) in 969, and their art--particularly textiles and luster ceramics, but also metalwork and carved rock-crystal, ivory and woodwork--has been admired for nearly a millennium. In this engaging and accessible book, Jonathan M. Bloom concentrates on securely dated and localized examples of Fatimid art and architecture. His discussions focus on significant examples and are illustrated with over 100 photographs, many in color, and extensive notes and bibliography provide guidance for further reading and research.

  • Julian of Norwich - Theologian

    For centuries readers have comfortably accepted Julian of Norwich as simply a mystic. In this astute book, Denys Turner offers a new interpretation of Julian and the significance of her work. Turner argues that this fourteenth-century thinker's sophisticated approach to theological questions places her legitimately within the pantheon of other great medieval theologians, including Thomas Aquinas, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Bonaventure.

    Julian wrote but one work in two versions, a Short Text recording the series of visions of Jesus Christ she experienced while suffering a near-fatal illness, and a much expanded Long Text exploring the theological meaning of the "showings" some twenty years later. Turner addresses the apparent conflict between the two sources of Julian's theology: on the one hand, her personal revelation of God's omnipotent love, and on the other, the Church's teachings on and her own witnessing of evil in the world that deserves punishment, even eternal punishment. Offering a fresh and elegant account of Julian's response to this conflict--one that reveals its nuances, systematic character, and originality--this book marks a new stage in the century-long rediscovery of one of the English language's greatest theological thinkers.

  • Luis Melendez: Master of the Spanish Still Life

    An exquisite look at the life and work of Luis Melendez, one of eighteenth-century Europe's greatest still-life painters.

  • Visual World of French Theory - Figurations

    This book focuses on the remarkable series of encounters between the most prominent French philosophers of the 1960s and 1970s - Jean-Paul Sartre, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Felix Guattari, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Jacques Derrida - and the artists of their times, most particularly the protagonists of the Narrative Figuration movement - Bernard Rancillac, Lucio Fanti, Gerard Fromanger, Jacques Monory, Valerio Adami. Each of these encounters involved either a mutual engagement or the writing of critical texts or catalogue prefaces, and the texts that lie at the heart of each chapter illuminate not only the work of the artists but also the production of the philosopher - writer concerned. While the protagonists of 'French theory' are universally known and studied across all humanities disciplines, their thought is presented without a sense of contiguity, chronology or context in translation, while the artists with whom they engaged are relatively unknown outside the French-speaking world. This account restores the lived context of artistic production, where political engagement on the Left was a driving factor. What Bourdieu called 'cultural competence' is seen to be essential for these particular philosophers in the wake of Jean-Paul Sartre's writings on art from the 1940s to the 1970s. In this revelatory book, Sarah Wilson shows that it is via the philosophers - whose names are as familiar to an international public as the names of impressionist or cubist painters - that the figurative art of 1970s France can be introduced to the audience it deserves.

  • Getting it Wrong From the Beginning - Our Progressivist Inheritance from Herbert Spencer, John Dewey and Jean Piaget

    The ideas upon which public education was founded in the last half of the nineteenth century were wrong. And despite their continued dominance in educational thinking for a century and a half, these ideas are no more right today. So argues one of the most original and highly regarded educational theorists of our time in Getting It Wrong from the Beginning. Kieran Egan explains how we have come to take mistaken concepts about education for granted and why this dooms our attempts at educational reform.

    Egan traces the nineteenth-century sources of Progressive thinking about education and their persistence even now. He diagnoses the problem with our schools in a radically different way, and likewise prescribes novel alternatives to present educational practice. His book is both persuasive and full of promise--a book that belongs on the must-read list for anyone who cares about the success of our schools.

  • Facing Beauty - Painted Women and Cosmetic Art

    Throughout the history of the Western world, countless attempts have been made to define beauty in art and life, especially with regard to women's bodies and faces. 'Facing Beauty' examines concepts of female beauty in terms of the ideal and the real, investigating paradigms of beauty as represented in art and literature and how beauty has been enhanced by cosmetics and hairstyles. This thought-provoking book discusses the shifting perceptions of female beauty, concentrating on the period from about 1540 to 1940. It begins with the Renaissance, when a renewed emphasis on the individual was reflected in the celebration of beauty in the portraits of the day. The fluid, sensual lines of the Baroque period initiated a shift toward a more 'natural' look, giving way in the 18th century to a more stylized and artificial face, a mask of ideal beauty. By the late 19th century, commercial beauty preparations had become more readily available, leading to new beauty industry technological developments in the early 20th century. Beauty salons and the wider availability of cosmetics revolutionized the way women saw themselves. Ravishing images of some of the most beautiful women in history, both real and ideal, accompanied by illustrations from costume books, fashion plates, advertisements, caricatures, and cosmetics, bring the evolving story of beauty to life on these pages.

  • Aldo van Eyck

    A comprehensive look at the life and work of one of the 20th century's most influential architects

    Aldo van Eyck (1918-1999) was a Dutch architect, writer, and teacher who helped redefine Modern architecture in the second half of the 20th century. As an advocate for architecture's engagement with history, culture, climate, and the lived human experience of buildings and urban spaces, he created designs that privileged place and the daily rituals in the lives of its inhabitants over universal ideals. In this volume, enlivened by 300 illustrations from the Aldo van Eyck archive, Robert McCarter provides the first comprehensive study of van Eyck's 50-year career since his death, guiding readers through the architect's buildings and unrealized projects, with a focus on the interior spatial experience and on the design and construction processes. Highlighted projects include the Amsterdam Orphanage, the Roman Catholic Church in The Hague, and some of the hundreds of playgrounds he famously designed over the course of his career. McCarter also investigates how van Eyck's writings and lectures convey the importance of architecture in the everyday lives of people around the world and throughout history. By presenting his design work together with the principles on which it was founded, McCarter illuminates van Eyck's ethical interpretation of architecture's place in the world.

  • More Than One - Photographs in Sequence

    The essays in 'More than One' examine sequentiality and serialism in the practice of photography from the medium's earliest years to the present. Contributors explore nuances of syntax and sense raised by works like photographic albums, books, thematic portfolios, journalistic photo features and documentations of performance art. Fully illustrated essays discuss, among other topics, the little-known volume 'Beyond This Point' (1929), a collaborative experiment by American photographer Francis Bruguiere and London radio producer Lance Sieveking; the evolving relationship between public space and sexual self-definition in the early work of Minor White; and, an important performance work by artist Ana Mendieta. The title essay surveys the social conditions and expressive motives that have given rise to serial and sequential forms throughout the history of photography.

  • What Is Research In The Visual Arts? - Obbsession, Archive, Encounter

    With essays by Ernst van Alphen, Mieke Bal, Marc Gotlieb, Serge Guilbaut, Michael Ann Holly, Akira Mizuta Lippit, W. J. T. Mitchell, Joanne Morra, Sina Najafi, Alexander Nemerov, Celeste Olalquiaga, Alexander Potts, and Reva Wolf

    The discipline of art history is in a moment of self-consciousness, and art historians are increasingly more self-reflexive about their practices. In this volume, thirteen authors address both the philosophical and practical issues now facing those in the visual arts field by investigating the ever-pressing issue of research.

    Their essays explore the remarkable nature of art historians' personal, political, aesthetic, creative, and emotive curiosity and the process of doing research in the archive, library, studio, gallery, museum, and beyond. As such, the book considers the pleasures and dangers of researchers' obsessions and encounters with the incoherence, chaos, and wonder that lie at the heart of searching for the not-yet-known. The volume is based on the 2007 Clark Conference of the same name.

  • First Nights - Five Musical Premiers

    This lively book takes us back to the first performances of five famous musical compositions: Monteverdi's Orfeo in 1607, Handel's Messiah in 1742, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony in 1824, Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique in 1830, and Stravinsky's Sacre du printemps in 1913. Thomas Forrest Kelly sets the scene for each of these premieres, describing the cities in which they took place, the concert halls, audiences, conductors, and musicians, the sound of the music when it was first performed (often with instruments now extinct), and the popular and critical responses. He explores how performance styles and conditions have changed over the centuries and what music can reveal about the societies that produce it.

    Kelly tells us, for example, that Handel recruited musicians he didn't know to perform Messiah in a newly built hall in Dublin; that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was performed with a mixture of professional and amateur musicians after only three rehearsals; and that Berlioz was still buying strings for the violas and mutes for the violins on the day his symphony was first played. Kelly's narrative, which is enhanced by extracts from contemporary letters, press reports, account books, and other sources, as well as by a rich selection of illustrations, gives us a fresh appreciation of these five masterworks, encouraging us to sort out our own late twentieth-century expectations from what is inherent in the music.

  • Isle of Wight

    This comprehensive and generously illustrated guide explores the beguiling buildings of the Isle of Wight. The island's many towns, villages, and resorts are included in a detailed gazetteer, as are the charming villas and cottages ornes dotted around the spectacular coasts. Among the grand architecture found on the island are the powerful fortress of Carisbrooke Castle; the rich Baroque mansion of Appuldurcombe; Victoria and Albert's Osborne House; and the extraordinary Quarr Abbey, a masterpiece of Expressionist brick. Other attractions include Roman villas, sturdy manor houses, powerful coastal defenses built for Henry VIII (and reinforced under Queen Victoria), and the retreats of Tennyson and other Victorian notables, not to mention a well-established tradition of innovative modern design.

  • Oxfordshire

    Oxford's unique collection of university and college buildings both old and new form a major part of this book. The city itself with its medieval walls and castle and ancient churches is also fully described. Among the county's distinguished houses are Vanbrugh's Blenheim and Kent's Rousham Park, each in magnificently landscaped grounds, while village churches range from notable Norman examples such as Iffley to G.E. Street's inventive Victorian creations such as St Simon & St Jude at Shipton-under-Wychwood. Other attractive towns in this still strongly rural county vary from stone-built Chipping Norton in the Cotswolds to brick-built Henley on the Thames.

  • The Puritan Origins Of American Patriotism

    How the Puritans' belief in a providential mission led to a uniquely American form of patriotism

    In this absorbing book, George McKenna ranges across the entire panorama of American history to track the development of American patriotism. That patriotism--shaped by Reformation Protestantism and imbued with the American Puritan belief in a providential "errand"--has evolved over 350 years and influenced American political culture in both positive and negative ways, McKenna shows. The germ of the patriotism, an activist theology that stressed collective rather than individual salvation, began in the late 1630s in New England and traveled across the continent, eventually becoming a national phenomenon. Today, American patriotism still reflects its origins in the seventeenth century. By encouraging cohesion in a nation of diverse peoples and inspiring social reform, American patriotism has sometimes been a force for good. But the book also uncovers a darker side of the nation's patriotism--a prejudice against the South in the nineteenth century, for example, and a tendency toward nativism and anti-Catholicism. Ironically, a great reversal has occurred, and today the most fervent believers in the Puritan narrative are the former "outsiders"--Catholics and Southerners. McKenna offers an interesting new perspective on patriotism's role throughout American history, and he concludes with trenchant thoughts on its role in the post-9/11 era.

  • The Essential Art of African Textiles: Design Without End

    This informative and beautiful volume sheds light on the enduring significance of textiles as a major form of aesthetic expression across Africa, relating long-standing cultural practices to recent creative developments. Some of the finest and oldest preserved examples of West African textile traditions are presented, and both their artistic and technical qualities are examined. Wrapped around the body, fashioned into garments, or displayed as hangings, these magnificent textiles include bold strip weavings and intricately patterned indigo resist-dyed cloths. The influence of African textiles on contemporary artists is also explored, featuring artworks by eight individuals who work in media as far-ranging as sculpture, painting, photography, video, and installation art. A monumental metal tapestry by the Ghanaian El Anatsui that pays tribute to traditional kente prestige cloth while constituting an inventive new genre is discussed in detail.

  • A Private Passion: 19th Century Paintings and Drawings from the Grenville L. Winthrop Collection, Harvard University

    Grenville L. Winthrop (1864-1943) was a lawyer and banker by profession, but his true passion was collecting art. He had the resources, the intuition and talented advisers to help him create a collection that is distinct not only in its depth and breadth, but also in its quality. The Winthrop Collection of French, British and American art includes the best group of Delacroix and Ingres drawings outside of France, the most significant group of pre-Raphaelite paintings outside of Britain, and a world-renowned collection of Sargent watercolours.

  • The Voices of Morebath - Reformation & Rebellion in an English Village

    In the fifty years between 1530 and 1580, England moved from being one of the most lavishly Catholic countries in Europe to being a Protestant nation, a land of whitewashed churches and antipapal preaching. What was the impact of this religious change in the countryside? And how did country people feel about the revolutionary upheavals that transformed their mental and material worlds under Henry VIII and his three children?

    In this book a reformation historian takes us inside the mind and heart of Morebath, a remote and tiny sheep farming village on the southern edge of Exmoor. The bulk of Morebath's conventional archives have long since vanished. But from 1520 to 1574, through nearly all the drama of the English Reformation, Morebath's only priest, Sir Christopher Trychay, kept the parish accounts on behalf of the churchwardens. Opinionated, eccentric, and talkative, Sir Christopher filled these vivid scripts for parish meetings with the names and doings of his parishioners. Through his eyes we catch a rare glimpse of the life and pre-Reformation piety of a sixteenth-century English village.

    The book also offers a unique window into a rural world in crisis as the Reformation progressed. Sir Christopher Trychay's accounts provide direct evidence of the motives which drove the hitherto law-abiding West-Country communities to participate in the doomed Prayer-Book Rebellion of 1549 culminating in the siege of Exeter that ended in bloody defeat and a wave of executions. Its church bells confiscated and silenced, Morebath shared in the punishment imposed on all the towns and villages of Devon and Cornwall. Sir Christopher documents the changes in the community, reluctantly Protestant and increasingly preoccupied with the secular demands of the Elizabethan state, the equipping of armies, and the payment of taxes. Morebath's priest, garrulous to the end of his days, describes a rural world irrevocably altered and enables us to hear the voices of his villagers after four hundred years of silence.

  • Northumberland

    The county's remarkable and richly varied military architecutre, from Hadrian's Wall to Warkworth, contrasts with monastic ruins buried deep in the valleys of the Coquet and the Aln or standing proudly by the sea at Holy Island and Tynemouth. Newcastle upon Tyne has the most elegant nineteenth-century city centre in England. Elsewhere the distinctive smaller towns include Alnwick, dominated by its castle, Hexham with its priory, brick-built Morpeth, and Berwick-upon-Tweed, ringed with exceptional sixteenth-century fortifications. Great country houses range from Vanbrugh's theatrical Seaton Delaval to Sir Charles Monck's austere Belsay and Norman Shaw's romantic Cragside. Monuments of a great industrial past, as well as a wealth of smaller buildings, such as bastle houses (peelhouses or stronghouses unique to the Border country), are all vividly described in this revised guide to Northumberland's architectural pleasures.

  • John Singer Sargent - Venetian Figures and Landscapes 1898 - 1913 V 6

    Throughout his career - and particularly in the period from 1898 to 1913 - John Singer Sargent painted the spectacular architecture and scenes of everyday life in Venice, as he sat alongside the Grand Canal or in a gondola in the sleepy side canals. This lavishly illustrated book presents all the luminous masterworks that Sargent completed during that fertile fifteen-year period: oils and watercolours that reveal his taste for the Renaissance, Baroque and high style in art and architecture as they were seen in the city's unique light. The book reproduces and documents 141 works, including several that are published for the first time. An authoritative essay explores the aesthetics of Sargent's Venetian work, places it in the context of his oeuvre as a whole, explains Sargent's relationships with his patrons in Venice and discusses the exhibitions and marketing of this work in London and New York. The book also provides a map of Venice marking every known location that Sargent painted and displays dozens of contemporary colour photographs of the sites.

  • Alias Man Ray

    Born Emmanuel Radnitzky, the artist known as Man Ray (1890-1976) revealed multiple artistic identities over the course of his career - New York Dedaist, Parisian Surrealist, international portraitist, and fashion photographer - and produced important works as a photographer, painter, filmmaker, writer, and maker of objects. 'Alias Man Ray' considers how the artist's life and career were shaped by his turn-of-the-century American Jewish immigrant experience and his lifelong evasion of his past. As an exploration of the artist's deliberate cultural ambiguity, which allowed him to become the first American artist to be accepted by the Paris avant-garde, this book examines the dynamic connection between Man Ray's working-class origins, his assimilation, the evolution of his art, and his willful construction of his own artistic persona, as evidenced in a series of subtle, encrypted self-references throughout the artist's career. Beautifully illustrated, 'Alias Man Ray' will stand as a definitive study of an incomparable figure in 20th-century art.

  • Picasso and American Art

    An unprecedented examination of the history of American modern art through the work of its most influential forerunner

    Many American artists throughout the 20th century designated Pablo Picasso as the central figure of the modern movement and defined their own artistic achievements through their absorption, critique, or rejection of his example. Picasso and American Art is a groundbreaking publication juxtaposing works by Picasso with the paintings, sculptures, and drawings created in response by an extremely diverse group of his contemporaries and successors, including Max Weber, Stuart Davis, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, David Smith, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jasper Johns.

    Based on extensive research, Michael FitzGerald's text provides valuable new information on the fundamental role that Picasso played in the development of modern American art--both through his friendships with individual artists and through the dissemination of his evolving work. This book also documents, for the first time, the accessibility of Picasso's work in the United States between 1911 and 1957 in exhibitions, collections, and publications through a comprehensive chronology.
    This unique book is essential for anyone interested in either Picasso or American art of the 20th century.

  • Second Nature - Brain Science and Human Knowledge

    A renowned neuroscientist explains how our brains and bodies give rise to knowledge, creativity, and mental experience

    Burgeoning advancements in brain science are opening up new perspectives on how we acquire knowledge. Indeed, it is now possible to explore consciousness--the very center of human concern--by scientific means. In this illuminating book, Dr. Gerald M. Edelman offers a new theory of knowledge based on striking scientific findings about how the brain works. And he addresses the related compelling question: Does the latest research imply that all knowledge can be reduced to scientific description?
    Edelman's brain-based approach to knowledge has rich implications for our understanding of creativity, of the normal and abnormal functioning of the brain, and of the connections among the different ways we have of knowing. While the gulf between science and the humanities and their respective views of the world has seemed enormous in the past, the author shows that their differences can be dissolved by considering their origins in brain functions. He foresees a day when brain-based devices will be conscious, and he reflects on this and other fascinating ideas about how we come to know the world and ourselves.

  • Reason, Faith and Revolution - Reflections on the God Debate

    Terry Eagleton's witty and polemical 'Reason, Faith, and Revolution' is bound to cause a stir among scientists, theologians, people of faith and people of no faith, as well as general readers eager to understand the God Debate. On the one hand, Eagleton demolishes what he calls the 'superstitious' view of God held by most atheists and agnostics, and offers in its place a revolutionary account of the Christian Gospel. On the other hand, he launches a stinging assault on the betrayal of this revolution by institutional Christianity. There is little joy here, then, either for the anti-God brigade - Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens in particular - nor for many conventional believers. Instead, Eagleton offers his own vibrant account of religion and politics in a book that ranges from the Holy Spirit to the recent history of the Middle East, from Thomas Aquinas to the Twin Towers.

  • Framing the West - The Survey Photographs of Timothy H. O′Sullivan

    The image of the untamed American West persists as one of that country's most enduring cultural myths, and few photographers have captured more compelling images of the frontier than Timothy H. O'Sullivan. Trained under Mathew Brady, O'Sullivan accompanied several government expeditions to the West - most notably with geologist Clarence King in 1867 and cartographer George M. Wheeler in 1871. Along these journeys, O'Sullivan produced many beautiful photographs that exhibit a forthright and rigorous style formed in response to the landscapes he encountered. Faced with challenging terrain and lacking previous photographic examples on which to rely, O'Sullivan created a body of work that was without precedent in its visual and emotional complexities. The first major publication on O'Sullivan in more than thirty years, 'Framing the West' offers a new aesthetic and formal interpretation of O'Sullivan's photographs and assesses his influence on the larger photographic canon. The book features previously unpublished and rarely seen images and serves as a field guide for O'Sullivan's original prints, presenting them for the first time in sequence with the chronology of their production.

  • Designing Type

    An indispensable new guide for developing and designing typefaces

    One of the most essential tools of graphic design, typography influences the appearance of visual print materials perhaps more than any other component. This essential book explains the processes behind creating and designing type. Author Karen Cheng discusses issues of structure, optical compensation, and legibility, with special emphasis given to the often overlooked relationships between letters and shapes in font design.
    The book is illustrated with numerous diagrams that demonstrate visual principles and letter construction, ranging from informal progress sketches to final type designs and diagrams. A wide range of classic and modern typefaces is analyzed, including those from many premier contemporary type foundries. Introductory essays and diagrams emphasize the history of type, the primary systems of typeface classification, the two main proportional systems for type, the parts of a letter, the effects of new technology on design methodology, the optical illusions that affect density and balance in letterforms, and the differences in form between basic serif typestyles. The book provides detailed guidelines for creating serif and sans serif letters, numbers, punctuation, and accents.
    As design clients increasingly call for original and custom typefaces, Designing Type is a superb reference for both students and professional graphic designers.

  • Forest Entomology

    The New Paradigm in Architecture tells the story of a movement that has changed the face of architecture over the last forty years. The book begins by surveying the counter culture of the 1960s, when Jane Jacobs and Robert Venturi called for a more complex urbanism and architecture. It concludes by showing how such demands began to be realized by the 1990s in a new architecture that is aided by computer design-more convivial, sensuous, and articulate than the Modern architecture it challenges. Promoted by such architects as Frank Gehry, Daniel Libeskind, and Peter Eisenman, it has also been adopted by many schools and offices around the world. Charles Jencks traces the history of computer design which is, at its heart, built on the desire for an architecture that communicates with its users, one based on the heterogeneity of cities and global culture. This book, the first to explore the broad issue of Postmodernism, has fostered its growth in other fields such as philosophy and the arts. First written at the start of an architectural movement in the mid-1970s, it has been translated into eleven languages and has gone through six editions. Now completely rewritten and with two new chapters, this edition brings the history up to date with the latest twists in the narrative and the turn to a new complexity in architecture.

  • Gary Schneider - Portraits

    An introduction to the provocative portrait work of an innovative contemporary photographer

    Considered one of the most thought-provoking photographers practicing today, South African-born Gary Schneider creates unique luminescent portraits that transform their specific subject matter and probe the enigmatic character of identity. This remarkable book is the first to examine Schneider's innovative portrait work.


    Deborah Martin Kao discusses Schneider's re-presentation of nineteenth-century studio portraits, his handprint photograms, and his fragmented face portraits--all of which reveal as much about the language of photography as they do about the subjects being depicted. She shows how Schneider portrays the collaboration between artist and subject, seen in his use of a light pen to sculpt or trace his subjects over long exposures, and in his prints that display traces of movement in time. Kao also discusses Schneider's work with scientists to create negatives from which he makes strikingly beautiful images of blood, DNA, and strands of hair, and how these represent a fascinating evolution in traditional thinking about the nature of photographic portraiture.


    Gary Schneider: Portraits also features an interview with Schneider that provides insight into the life and working methods of an extraordinary contemporary photographer.

  • Philippians

    In Philippians John Reumann offers both classical approaches and new methods of understanding this New Testament book. With fresh commentary on the social world and rhetorical criticism, and special focus on the contributions of the Philippian house churches to Paul's work and early Christian mission, Reumann clarifies Paul's attitudes toward and interactions with the Philippians.

    Departing from traditional readings of Philippians in light of Acts, Reumann allows Paul to speak in his own right. His three letters from Ephesus shed new light on relationships, and we come to see how he approves some aspects of the dominant "culture of friendship" in Greco-Roman Philippi while disapproving others. He seeks to help the Philippians discern how to be citizens of the heavenly kingdom and also Caesar's state, though there is an undercurrent of "Christ vs. Caesar." Scholars, students, and general readers alike will find much of interest in John Reumann's deeply researched and insightful new volume.

  • The Pictures Generation 1974 - 1984

    This handsome book is the first comprehensive examination of the Pictures Generation, a loosely knit group of artists working in New York from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s. The overarching subject of the work of these artists was imagery itself - how pictures not only depict but also shape how we perceive the world and ourselves. The collective achievement of this group is an extremely important chapter in the history of contemporary art. Born into an expanding media and consumer culture and educated in the strategies of Minimal and Conceptual art, the artists of the Pictures Generation, including Robert Longo, Richard Prince, David Salle, and Cindy Sherman, chose to return to representation, addressing the rhetorical, social, and psychological functions of the image across all media (photography, painting and sculpture, drawings and prints, film and video, and music and performance). While the careers of these artists are typically considered in isolation, this catalogue traces their complex interrelationships and mutual development, beginning with the emergence of a group sensibility characterized by techniques of distancing and theatricality and ending with a resurgence of painting by mostly male artists (which was contested by women artists working in media such as video, photography, and installation).

  • Ancient Greek Athletics

    A comprehensive survey of sports in ancient Greece, available just in time for the Summer Olympics in Athens

    The earliest Olympic games began more than twenty-five-hundred years ago. What were they like, how were they organized, who participated? Were ancient sports a means of preparing youth for warfare? In this lavishly illustrated book, a world expert on ancient Greek athletics provides the first comprehensive introduction to the subject, vividly describing ancient sporting events and games and exploring their impact on art, literature, and politics.

    Using a wide array of ancient sources, written and visual, and including recent archaeological discoveries, Stephen Miller reconstructs ancient Greek athletic festivals and the details of specific athletic events. He also explores broader themes, including the role of women in ancient athletics, the place of amateurism, and the relationship between athletic events and social and political life.

    Published in the year the modern Olympic Games return to Athens, this book will be a source of information and enjoyment for anyone interested in the history of athletics and the origins of the world's most famous sporting event.

  • Beethoven′s Piano Sonatas - A Short Companion - inc FREE CD

    Beethoven's piano sonatas form one of the most important collections of works in the whole history of music. Spanning several decades of his life as a composer, the sonatas soon came to be seen as the first body of substantial serious works for piano suited to performance in large concert halls seating hundreds of people.

    In this comprehensive and authoritative guide, Charles Rosen places the works in context and provides an understanding of the formal principles involved in interpreting and performing this unique repertoire, covering such aspects as sonata form, phrasing, and tempo, as well as the use of pedal and trills. In the second part of his book, he looks at the sonatas individually, from the earliest works of the 1790s through the sonatas of Beethoven's youthful popularity of the early 1800s, the subsequent years of mastery, the years of stress (1812-1817), and the last three sonatas of the 1820s.

    Composed as much for private music-making as public recital, Beethoven's sonatas have long formed a bridge between the worlds of the salon and the concert hall. For today's audience, Rosen has written a guide that brings out the gravity, passion, and humor of these works and will enrich the appreciation of a wide range of readers, whether listeners, amateur musicians, or professional pianists.
    The book includes a CD of Rosen performing extracts from several of the sonatas, illustrating points made in the text.

  • The Future of the Internet--and How to Stop It

    The Internet is primed for a meltdown--and the most obvious cures are just as bad

    This extraordinary book explains the engine that has catapulted the Internet from backwater to ubiquity--and reveals that it is sputtering precisely because of its runaway success. With the unwitting help of its users, the generative Internet is on a path to a lockdown, ending its cycle of innovation--and facilitating unsettling new kinds of control.

    IPods, iPhones, Xboxes, and TiVos represent the first wave of Internet-centered products that can't be easily modified by anyone except their vendors or selected partners. These "tethered appliances" have already been used in remarkable but little-known ways: car GPS systems have been reconfigured at the demand of law enforcement to eavesdrop on the occupants at all times, and digital video recorders have been ordered to self-destruct thanks to a lawsuit against the manufacturer thousands of miles away. New Web 2.0 platforms like Google mash-ups and Facebook are rightly touted--but their applications can be similarly monitored and eliminated from a central source. As tethered appliances and applications eclipse the PC, the very nature of the Internet--its "generativity," or innovative character--is at risk.

    The Internet's current trajectory is one of lost opportunity. Its salvation, Zittrain argues, lies in the hands of its millions of users. Drawing on generative technologies like Wikipedia that have so far survived their own successes, this book shows how to develop new technologies and social structures that allow users to work creatively and collaboratively, participate in solutions, and become true "netizens."

  • Witch Craze - Terror and Fantasy in Baroque Germany

    A powerful account of witches, crones, and the societies that make them

    From the gruesome ogress in Hansel and Gretel to the hags at the sabbath in Faust, the witch has been a powerful figure of the Western imagination. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries thousands of women confessed to being witches--of making pacts with the Devil, causing babies to sicken, and killing animals and crops--and were put to death. This book is a gripping account of the pursuit, interrogation, torture, and burning of witches during this period and beyond.

    Drawing on hundreds of original trial transcripts and other rare sources in four areas of Southern Germany, where most of the witches were executed, Lyndal Roper paints a vivid picture of their lives, families, and tribulations. She also explores the psychology of witch-hunting, explaining why it was mostly older women that were the victims of witch crazes, why they confessed to crimes, and how the depiction of witches in art and literature has influenced the characterization of elderly women in our own culture.

  • Giorgio Morandi - The Art of Silence

    Giorgio Morandi (1890--1964), an Italian painter and printmaker renowned for his simple yet stunning still lifes, is also famous for his legendary reputation as a recluse, an artist who resided in a world bound by the walls of his Bologna studio. Giorgio Morandi: The Art of Silence dispels this myth and is the first and only study in English to cover Morandi's career in its entirety as well as in the sociopolitical and cultural context of Italian art. Janet Abramowicz, Morandi's former teaching assistant, takes the reader through half a century of Italian art history and its most significant movements--Futurism, Pittura Metafisica, Valori Plastici, Strapaese, Novecento--most of which have received scant attention from English-language scholars. Abramowicz shows how Morandi worked in close proximity to mainstream contemporary European art and tells the story of his relationship to the Fascist politics and patrons of his time, illustrating how his connections to this period were muted after the fall of the regime in post--World War II Italy in an effort to establish the artist as apolitical. Morandi was the only Italian modernist to emerge from Fascism unscathed. An important new addition to scholarship on twentieth-century Italian art history, this book features many rare and previously unpublished images and will fascinate admirers of Morandi and his transcendent work.

  • Eleanor of Aquitaine - Queen of France, Queen of England

    Eleanor of Aquitaine's extraordinary life seems more likely to be found in the pages of fiction. Proud daughter of a distinguished French dynasty, she married the king of France, Louis VII, then the king of England, Henry II, and gave birth to two sons who rose to take the English throne - Richard the Lionheart and John. Renowned for her beauty, hungry for power, headstrong, and unconventional, Eleanor travelled on crusades, acted as regent for Henry II and later for Richard, incited rebellion, endured a fifteen-year imprisonment, and as an elderly widow still wielded political power with energy and enthusiasm. This gripping biography is the definitive account of the most important queen of the Middle Ages. Ralph Turner, a leading historian of the twelfth century, strips away the myths that have accumulated around Eleanor - the 'black legend' of her sexual appetite, for example - and challenges the accounts that relegate her to the shadows of the kings she married and bore. Turner focuses on a wealth of primary sources, including a collection of Eleanor's own documents not previously accessible to scholars, and portrays a woman who sought control of her own destiny in the face of forceful resistance. A queen of unparalleled appeal, Eleanor of Aquitaine retains her power to fascinate even 800 years after her death.

  • The Follies and Garden Buildings of Ireland

    This entertaining and lovely book--the first to focus solely on follies and other garden buildings in Ireland--re-creates in word and image the wonder of these picturesque and fanciful architectural oddities.
    "A work of sustained scholarship and relish for the subject."--Patricia Craig, Times Literary Supplement
    "A feast of ephemeral architectural embellishment."--House and Garden
    "[A] pioneering book. . . . It is beautifully designed and the well researched text is accompanied by excellent measured drawings and wonderful photographs. The volume is a delight to peruse, a veritable encyclopedia of the extraordinary and the fantastic."--Roger Stalley, The Irish Times
    "A major achievement."--Deborah Singmaster, Architects' Journal

  • Thomas Jeckyll - Architect & Designer

    Thomas Jeckyll (1827-1881) ranks among the least understood and most tragic Aesthetic Movement figures in England. This abundantly illustrated book explores his innovative and brilliant designs in architecture, furniture, metalwork, and interiors and restores him to his deserved place among the architect/designers of his time. The book is the definitive study of Jeckyll's life and work, and it presents his notable buildings and diverse examples of his decorative arts.

    Susan Weber Soros and Catherine Arbuthnott examine Jeckyll's most important architectural commissions, among them the extravagant five-story Cambridge town house, Rance's Folly. They also discuss the interiors he designed--some of the most innovative and evocative Aesthetic Movement rooms of his time--as well as the remarkable furniture and metalwork designs for which he is best-known today, including the "Four Seasons Gates" that were exhibited in Paris and Vienna.

  • The Aeneid

    This extraordinary new translation of the Aeneid stands alone among modern Vergil translations for its accuracy and poetic appeal. Sarah Ruden, a lyric poet in her own right, is the first woman to translate Vergil's great epic, and she renders the poem in the same number of lines as the original work - a very rare feat that maintains technical fidelity to the original without diminishing its emotional power. Ruden's translation follows Vergil's content faithfully, and the economy and fast pace she achieves are true to his own unflagging narrative force. With its central theme of national destiny versus the destiny of individuals, the poem has great resonance in our own times, and Ruden adheres closely to the poet's message. Her rendering of Vergil's words gives immediacy to his struggling faith that history has beauty and purpose in spite of its pain. With this distinguished translation, modern readers can experience for themselves the timeless power of Vergil's masterpiece.

  • Armed Martial Arts of Japan - Swordsmanship and Archery

    This unique history of Japanese armed martial arts--the only comprehensive treatment of the subject in English--focuses on traditions of swordsmanship and archery from ancient times to the present. G. Cameron Hurst III provides an overview of martial arts in Japanese history and culture, then closely examines the transformation of these fighting skills into sports. He discusses the influence of the Western athletic tradition on the armed martial arts as well as the ways the martial arts have remained distinctly Japanese.

    During the Tokugawa era (1600-1867), swordsmanship and archery developed from fighting systems into martial arts, transformed by the powerful social forces of peace, urbanization, literacy, and professionalized instruction in art forms. Hurst investigates the changes that occurred as military skills that were no longer necessary took on new purposes: physical fitness, spiritual composure, character development, and sport. He also considers Western misperceptions of Japanese traditional martial arts and argues that, contrary to common views in the West, Zen Buddhism is associated with the martial arts in only a limited way. The author concludes by exploring the modern organization, teaching, ritual, and philosophy of archery and swordsmanship; relating these martial arts to other art forms and placing them in the broader context of Japanese culture.

  • History and the Enlightenment

    Arguably the leading British historian of his generation, Hugh Trevor-Roper (1914-2003) is most celebrated and admired as the author of essays. This volume brings together some of the most original and radical writings of his career - many hitherto inaccessible, one never before published, all demonstrating his piercing intellect, urbane wit, and gift for elegant, vivid narrative. This collection focuses on the writing and understanding of history in the eighteenth century and on the great historians and the intellectual context that inspired or provoked their writings. It combines incisive discussion of such figures as Gibbon, Hume and Carlyle with broad sweeps of analysis and explication. Essays on the Scottish Enlightenment and the Romantic movement are balanced by intimate portraits of lesser-known historians whose significance Trevor-Roper took particular delight in revealing.

  • The Haunted Gallery - Painting, Photography and Film around 1900

    In the late nineteenth century, the development of a relatively new invention--the moving picture--dramatically changed visual culture. Films not only captured the public imagination, they altered the way the world was represented to and received by the eager viewing audience. This groundbreaking book explores the history of visual media in Britain during this key period, when the nineteenth century was closing and the twentieth just beginning.

    Lynda Nead shows in this original study how the period witnessed a transformation from stasis to movement across the entire range of visual media, including painting, photography, and film as well as stage magic, lantern pictures, early film posters, and astronomy. She looks at the effects of this transformation from a wide variety of perspectives, demonstrating how the idea of motion haunted all visual media and altered both viewers' expectations of the image and their modes of perception. Nead portrays a fascinating cultural landscape in the midst of change, filling in the details with a rich selection of illustrations.

  • The Architectural History of Venice Revised and Enlarged edtion

    This book is the indispensable guide to the history of architecture in Venice, encompassing the city's fascinating variety of buildings from ancient times to the present day. Completely updated and filled with splendid new illustrations, this edition invites all visitors to Venice, armchair travelers, and students of Renaissance art and architecture to a fuller appreciation of the buildings of this uniquely beautiful city.
    "The best concise introduction to Venetian architecture in English."--Times Literary Supplement
    "Compact and manageable . . . an excellent introduction to the novice preparing for a first Venetian experience."--Society of Architectural Historians
    "A hugely rewarding and accessible book."--Richard Cork, Modern Painters

  • Hart Crane - A Life

    Hart Crane's life was notoriously turbulent, persistently nonconformist, and tragically short. Born in 1899, Crane became one of the most significant modernist American poets, yet his self-destructive tendencies - violent outbursts, massive drinking binges, and dangerous sexual pursuits - came to a catastrophic conclusion when at only 32 he threw himself from the stern of an ocean liner into the Gulf of Mexico. This biography presents a full, frank portrait of Hart Crane, a poet attractive both for his flamboyance and passion for life, and for the magnificent sonorities of his work. Clive Fisher mines extant documents left behind by Crane to recount the intertwined stories of the poet's life: his work and the intellectual climate in which he wrote, his urgent and intractable relations with his parents, and his tortured yet incessant quest for emotional stability and love. He considers the autobiographical application of Crane's poems and recreates settings in London, Paris, Cleveland, Cuba and Mexico where he found inspiration. Fisher also redresses injustices to the reputation of Crane's father, Clarence; reintroduces Crane's important friends and their achievements; and without the constraints that hindered previous biographers examines Crane's promiscuity, positioning his activities in the context of the New York gay underworld of his time. The work also explains the suicidal tendencies of Grace Crane, Hart's mother, and recreates the scene of the poet's death with fresh material from documents of those aboard the ship. This biography seeks to provide an authoritative portrait of Hart Crane, a poet whose remarkable work places him among the most important American writers of the 20th century.

  • In the Company of Crows and Ravens

    This intriguing book examines the often surprising ways that crows and ravens and humans interact. Featuring more than 100 striking illustrations, the book recounts lively stories about crows and ravens throughout history and around the world, and the authors challenge us to reconsider our thinking not only about these compelling birds but also about ourselves.

  • Our Hero

    Since his first appearance in 'Action Comics Number One', published in late spring of 1938, Superman has represented the essence of American heroism. 'Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, and able to leap tall buildings in a single bound', the Man of Steel has thrilled audiences across the globe, yet as life-long 'Superman Guy' Tom De Haven argues in this highly entertaining book, his story is uniquely American. Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in the midst of the Great Depression, Superman is both a transcendent figure and, when posing as his alter-ego, reporter Clark Kent, a humble working-class citizen. An orphan and an immigrant, he shares a personal history with the many Americans who travelled there in search of a better life, and his amazing feats represent the wildest realization of the American dream. As De Haven reveals through behind-the-scenes vignettes, personal anecdotes, and lively interpretations of more than 70 years of comic books, radio programmes, TV shows, and Hollywood films, Superman's legacy seems, like the Man of Steel himself, to be utterly invincible.

  • The Corset - A Cultural History

    The corset is probably the most controversial garment in the history of fashion. Although regarded as an essential element of fashionable dress from the Renaissance into the twentieth century, the corset was also frequently condemned as an instrument of torture and the cause of ill health. Why did women continue to don steel and whalebone corsets for four hundred years? And why did they finally stop? This lavishly illustrated book offers fascinating and often surprising answers to these questions. Valerie Steele, one of the world's most respected fashion historians, explores the cultural history of the corset, demolishing myths about this notorious garment and revealing new information and perspectives on its changing significance over the centuries.

    Whereas most historians have framed the history of the corset in terms of oppression vs. liberation and fashion vs. health and comfort, Steele contends that women's experiences of corsetry varied considerably and cannot be fully understood within these narrow frames. Drawing on extensive research in textual, visual, and materials sources, the author disproves the beliefs that the corset was dangerously unhealthy and was designed primarily for the oppression of women. Women persisted in wearing corsets--despite powerful male authorities trying to dissuade them--because corsetry had positive connotations of social status, self-discipline, youth, and beauty. In the twentieth century the garment itself fell out of fashion but, Steele points out, it has become internalized as women replace the boned corset with diet, exercise, and plastic surgery. The book concludes with insightful analyses of such recent developments as the reconception of the corset as a symbol of rebellion and female sexual empowerment, the revival of the corset in contemporary high fashion, and its transformation from an item of underwear to outerwear.

  • Storytelling in Christian Art From Giotto to Donatello

    Recounting the biblical stories through visual images was the most prestigious form of commission for a Renaissance artist. In this book Jules Lubbock examines some of the most famous of these pictorial narratives by artists of the calibre of Giovanni Pisano, Duccio, Giotto, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Donatello and Masaccio. He explains how these artists portrayed the major biblical events such as the Sacrifice of Isaac, the Annunciation, the Feast of Herod and the Trial and Passion of Jesus so as to be easily recognizable and, at the same time, to capture our attention and imagination for long enough to enable us to search for deeper meanings. He provides evidence showing that the Church favoured the production of images that lent themselves to being read and interpreted in this way, and he describes the works themselves to demonstrate how the pleasurable activity of deciphering these meanings can work in practice. This fascinating book is richly illustrated, and many of its photographs have been specially taken to show how the paintings and relief sculptures appear in the settings for which they were originally designed. Seen from these viewpoints they become more readily intelligible. Likewise the starting point and the originality of Lubbock's interpretations lies in his accepting that these works of art were primarily designed to help people to reflect upon the ethical and religious significance of the biblical stories. The early Renaissance artists developed their highly innovative techniques to further these objectives, not as ends in themselves. Thus the book aims to appeal to students, scholars and the general public who are interested in Renaissance art and to those with a religious interest in biblical imagery.

  • Art of the Korean Renaissance 1400-1600

    This notable catalogue - the first English-language publication on the subject - highlights the art of the early period (1392-1592) of Korea's revolutionary Joseon dynasty. The Joseon rulers replaced the Buddhist establishment and recreated a Korean society informed on every level by Neo-Confucian ideals. They supported the production of innovative secular art inspired by past traditions, both native and from the broader Confucian world. Yet despite official policies, court-sponsored Buddhist art endured, contributing to the rich complexity of the early Joseon culture. The exquisite paintings, porcelain and other ceramics, metalware, and lacquerware featured in the book are drawn from the holdings of major Korean and Japanese museums, the collection of the Metropolitan Museum and other U.S. collections and private collections. Many of the works have never been seen in the United States.

  • Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent

    Paul Mendes-Flohr offers the first major biography in English in thirty years of the seminal Jewish philosopher Martin Buber. In this accessible new biography, Mendes-Flohr situates Buber's life and legacy in the intellectual and cultural life of German Jewry and in the broader European intellectual life of the first half of the twentieth century.

  • The Wealth of Networks - How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom

    With the radical changes in information production that the Internet has introduced, we stand at an important moment of transition, says Yochai Benkler in this thought-provoking book. The phenomenon he describes as social production is reshaping markets, while at the same time offering new opportunities to enhance individual freedom, cultural diversity, political discourse, and justice. But these results are by no means inevitable: a systematic campaign to protect the entrenched industrial information economy of the last century threatens the promise of today's emerging networked information environment.

    In this comprehensive social theory of the Internet and the networked information economy, Benkler describes how patterns of information, knowledge, and cultural production are changing--and shows that the way information and knowledge are made available can either limit or enlarge the ways people can create and express themselves. He describes the range of legal and policy choices that confront us and maintains that there is much to be gained--or lost--by the decisions we make today.

  • The Marvelous Hairy Girls - The Gonzales Sisters and Their Words

    This book tells the extraordinary story of three sixteenth-century sisters who, along with their father and brothers, were afflicted with an extremely rare genetic condition that made them unusually hairy. Amazingly, the Gonzales sisters were not mocked or shunned, but were welcomed in the courts of Europe, spending much of their lives among nobles, musicians, and artists. Their double identity as humans and beasts made them intriguing, and the girls and their father were the subjects not only of medical investigations but also of a considerable number of portraits, some of which still hang in European castles today. Using the Gonzales family as a lens, historian Merry Wiesner-Hanks examines their varied and wondrous times. The story of this family connects with every important change of their era - political and religious violence, colonial conquest, new forms of scholarship and science - and also provides insights into the complex relationships between beastliness, monstrosity, and gender in early modern life.

  • Hitchcock′s Music

    For half a century Alfred Hitchcock created films full of gripping and memorable music. Over his long career he presided over more musical styles than any director in history and ultimately changed how we think about film music. This book is the first to fully explore the essential role music played in the movies of Alfred Hitchcock. Based on extensive interviews with composers, writers, and actors, and research in rare archives, Jack Sullivan discusses how Hitchcock used music to influence the atmosphere, characterization, and even storylines of his films. Sullivan examines the directors important relationships with various composers, especially Bernard Herrmann, and tells the stories behind the musical decisions. Covering the whole of the directors career, from the early British works up to Family Plot, this engaging look at the work of Alfred Hitchcock offers new insight into his achievement and genius and changes the way we watch, and listen, to his movies.

  • American Quilts and Coverlets in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    This handsome book showcases the Metropolitan Museum's superb collection of 151 American quilts and coverlets. First published in 1990 and revised in 2007 to feature 32 new acquisitions and updated scholarship, this volume chronicles the development of quilt and coverlet production in the United States from the 18th to the 20th centuries, provides a glimpse into the lives of the makers and recipients of these pieces, and discusses their emergence as works of art. Notable pieces include the Phebe Warner and the Baltimore Presentation coverlets, Amish, Crazy, and Honeycomb quilts that exemplify achievement in abstract and geometric patterns, along with the Adeline Harris Sears Autograph Quilt, a memorial to the greatest politicians, composers, authors, and thinkers of the mid-19th century. Each work is catalogued with a description and essential information on materials, condition, publications, and references. Also included is an illustrated survey of materials and techniques used in the creation of these works.

  • Eva Hesse, Sculpture

    The work of Eva Hesse (1936--1970), one of the greatest American artists of the 1960s, continues to inspire and to endure in large part because of its deeply emotional and evocative qualities. Her latex and fiberglass sculptures in particular have a resonance that transcends the boundaries of minimalist art in which she had her roots. Hesse's breakthrough solo exhibition--Chain Polymers at the Fischbach Gallery in New York in 1968--was a turning point in postwar American art. Eva Hesse: Sculpture focuses on the artist's large-scale sculptures in latex and fiberglass and provides a rare opportunity to look at Hesse's artistic achievement within the historical context of her life in never-before-seen family diaries and photographs. Essays consider Hesse's art from a variety of angles: Elisabeth Sussman discusses the sculptures shown in the 1968 solo exhibition; Fred Wasserman delves into the Hesse family's life in Nazi Germany and in the German Jewish community in New York in the 1940s; Yve-Alain Bois examines Hesse's works within the context of the art and aesthetic theories of the 1960s; and Mark Godfrey analyzes the importance of Hesse's celebrated hanging sculptures of 1969--70. In addition to color reproductions of the artist's sculpture, the book features a copiously illustrated chronology of the artist's life.

  • An Atlas of the Peninsular War

    This is the first comprehensive modern atlas of the Peninsular War, the series of campaigns in Spain and Portugal between Napoleonic France and British forces commanded by the Duke of Wellington. Here a distinguished military historian examines and explains the sequence of battles and the course of war through expertly drawn colour cartography. A general introduction, together with an historical summary setting the campaigns in context, is followed by fifty-three detailed maps and plans, each with a complementary text providing a succinct description of the action depicted. The great battles of Vimeiro, Talavera, Busaco, Albuera, Salamanca, Vitoria and the Pyrenees are all graphically described, together with the main sieges and many minor combats. This is an indispensable companion for both serious students and military enthusiasts interested ion the Napoleonic Wars.

  • The New Industrial Revolution - Consumers, Globalization and the End of Mass Production

    The rapid emergence of China and India as prime locations for low-cost manufacturing has led some analysts to conclude that manufacturers in the "old economies" - the U.S., U.K., Germany, and Japan - are being edged out of a profitable future. But if countries that have historically been at the forefront of events in manufacturing can adapt adroitly, opportunities are by no means over, says the author of this timely book. Peter Marsh explores 250 years in the history of manufacturing, then examines the characteristics of the industrial revolution that is taking place right now. The driving forces that influence what types of goods are made and who makes them are little understood, Marsh observes. He discusses the key changes in what is happening in manufacturing today, including advances in technology, a greater focus on tailor-made goods aimed at specific individuals and industry users, participation of many more countries in world manufacturing, and the growing importance of sustainable forms of production. With broad historical sweep and dozens of engaging examples, Marsh explains these changes and their import both for consumers making purchase choices and for manufacturers assessing how to participate successfully in the new industrial era.

  • Singular Multiples - The Peter Blum Edition Archive 1980-1994

    Peter Blum was the first print publisher in the United States to introduce and promote a new generation of European, Asian, and American artists to a larger public. Singular Multiples presents all of the extraordinary works from the Blum Edition Archive, which contains completed portfolios, single editions, books, preparatory drawings, maquettes, working and trial proofs, and printing blocks and plates, totaling more than 1,200 works. This major archive was acquired in 1996 by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and is published here for the first time.
    Generously illustrated and handsomely produced, this book includes thematic essays that address the various collaborations between prominent artists and Peter Blum. These essays are followed by detailed entries on the portfolios in the collection, including works by John Baldessari, Jonathan Borofsky, Louise Bourgeois, Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Eric Fischl, Alex Katz, Barbara Kruger, Brice Marden, James Turrell, Terry Winters, Yukiori Yanagi, and others. Singular Multiples also includes a listing of related proofs and drawings and discusses the collection within the art historical context of the 1980s, all of which reveals Blum's "ability to persuade the best painters and sculptors of his day to produce prints" and his tremendous impact on the contemporary art world.

  • Ayrshire and Arran - The Buildings of Scotland

    Ayrshire and Arran is an area of striking contrasts. Its landscape ranges from sand dunes to rolling pastures to moors. The local architecture is similarly diverse, marrying natural beauty with industry and modernity. This survey, featuring specially commissioned photographs and maps, offers the kind of detailed and comprehensive analysis for which the Pevsner Architectural Guides are known. Highlights include the monument at the Skelmorlie Aisle and Robert Burns's birthplace in Alloway; the stones of Machrie Moor; medieval castles and planned towns; early churches and abbeys; and some of the best-known country houses, Culzean Castle and Dumfries House.

  • Shakespeare the Thinker

    A. D. Nuttall's study of Shakespeare's intellectual preoccupations is a literary tour de force and comes to crown the distinguished career of a Shakespeare scholar. Certain questions engross Shakespeare from his early plays to the late romances: the nature of motive, cause, personal identity and relation, the proper status of imagination, ethics and subjectivity, language and its capacity to occlude and to communicate. Yet Shakespeare's thought, Nuttall demonstrates, is anything but static. The plays keep returning to, modifying, and complicating his creative preoccupations. Nuttall allows us to hear and appreciate the emergent cathedral choir of play speaking to play. By the later stages of Nuttall's book this choir is nearly overwhelming in its power and dimensions. The author does not limit discussion to moments of crucial intellection but gives himself ample space in which to get at the distinctive essence of each work. Much recent historicist criticism has tended to 'flatten' Shakespeare by confining him to the thought-cliches of his time, and this in its turn has led to an implicitly patronizing view of him as unthinkingly racist, sexist, and so on. Nuttall shows us that, on the contrary, Shakespeare proves again and again to be more intelligent and perceptive than his 21st-century readers. This book challenges us to reconsider the relation of great literature to its social and historical matrix. It is also, perhaps, the best guide to Shakespeare's plays available in any language.

  • Digging and Dealing in Eighteenth-Century Rome 2 V Set

    This important and long-awaited book offers the first overview of all British-led excavation sites in and around Rome in the Golden Age of the Grand Tour in the eighteenth century. Based on work carried out by the late Ilaria Bignamini, the authors have undertaken the monumental task of tracing sculptures and other works of art that are currently in public collections around the world from their original find sites via the dealers and entrepreneurs to the private collectors in Britain. In the first of two extensively illustrated volumes, approximately fifty sites, each located by maps, are analysed in historical and topographical detail, supported by fifty newly written and researched biographies of the major names in the Anglo-Italian world of dealing and collecting. Essays by Bignamini and Hornsby introduce the field of study and elucidate the complex bureaucracy of the relevant departments of the Papal courts. The second volume of the books is a collection of hundreds of letters from the dealers and excavators abroad to collectors in England, offering a rich source of information about all aspects of the art market at the time. The book is an invaluable resource for scholars working in a rapidly expanding area where European art and cultural history meets archaeology.

  • Out of the East - Spices and the Medieval Imagination

    The demand for spices in medieval Europe was extravagant and was reflected in the pursuit of fashion, the formation of taste, and the growth of luxury trade. It inspired geographical and commercial exploration as traders pursued such common spices as pepper and cinnamon, and rarer aromatic products including ambergris and musk. Ultimately, the spice quest led to imperial missions that were to change world history. This engaging book explores the demand for spices: why were they so popular, and why so expensive? Paul Freedman surveys the history, geography, economics, and culinary tastes of the Middle Ages to uncover the surprisingly varied ways that spices were put to use - in elaborate medieval cuisine, in the treatment of disease, for the promotion of wellbeing, and to perfume important ceremonies of the Church. Spices became symbols of beauty, affluence, taste, and grace, Freedman shows, and their expense and fragrance drove the engines of commerce and conquest at the dawn of the modern era.

  • On Understanding Science - An Historical Approach

    The language, customs, and manners of scientists are frequently unintelligible to the rest of the population, and there is considerable danger that the ideas and forces that are moving mountains will be increasingly inaccessible tothose outside the laboratories. The peril of such a situation to a democracy, where understanding must be assumed to be fairly general, is probably as great in the realm of ideas as the physical danger of the instruments of destruction. Dr. Conant sets out to show how the gulf can be bridged. Instead of a series of assertions about science being ordered knowledge, or the classification of facts, he presents a historical view of a number of the great scientists, of what their generation knew of their subjects, of the problem they set out to examine, and of how they solved it. The reader is enabled to follow the scientific method at work, with all its limitations and wonders.

  • Baghdad at Sunrise - A Brigade Commander′s War in Iraq

    This compelling book presents an unparalleled record of what happened after U.S. forces seized Baghdad in the spring of 2003. Army Colonel Peter R. Mansoor, the on-the-ground commander of the 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division (the 'Ready First Combat Team') describes his brigade's first year in Iraq, from the sweltering, chaotic summer after the Ba'athists' defeat to the transfer of sovereignty to an interim Iraqi government a year later. Uniquely positioned to observe, record, and assess the events of that fateful year, Mansoor now explains what went right and wrong as the U.S. military confronted an insurgency of unexpected strength and tenacity. Drawing not only on his own daily combat journal but also on observations by embedded reporters, news reports, combat logs, archived e-mails, and many other sources, Mansoor offers a contemporary record of the valour, motivations and resolve of the 1st Brigade and its attachments during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Yet this book has a deeper significance than a personal memoir or unit history. 'Baghdad at Sunrise' provides a detailed, nuanced analysis of U.S. counterinsurgency operations in Iraq, and along with it critically important lessons for America's military and political leaders of the twenty-first century.

  • The Jewish Identity Project - New American Photography

    Ten newly commissioned projects examine the complexities of contemporary Jewish American identity

    While American Jews are commonly considered a homogenous ethnic group, the reality today is far more complex. Conversion, adoption, intermarriage, and immigration have transformed the fabric of Jewish communities, as they have the United States as a nation. This fascinating book explores questions of American Jewish identity and how Jews fit today into larger discourses of race, ethnicity, and religion. Featuring ten photographic and video projects by emerging and mid-career artists, all commissioned by The Jewish Museum, the book presents a range of provocative discussions of the nature of Jewish identity in 21st-century America.


    Susan Chevlowe discusses how the artists explore individual communities to dispel stereotypes of contemporary Jewish life, and Ilan Stavans dissects the diversity of American Jews over the last century. In illuminating interviews with the artists, Joanna Lindenbaum provides insights into their ideas and methods. A beautifully illustrated portfolio of each of the commissioned works immerses the viewer in a distinctive community, revealing complex and often surprising ways in which Jewish Americans grapple with their identity.


    Participating artists:

    - Dawoud Bey

    - Tirtza Even and Brian Karl

    - Rainer Ganahl

    - Nikki S. Lee

    - Yoshua Okon

    - Jaime Permuth

    - Andrea Robbins and Max Becher

    - Shari Rothfarb and Avishai Mekonen

    - Jessica Shokrian

    - Chris Verene

  • Origins of the Bill of Rights

    Americans resorted to arms in 1775 not to establish new liberties but to defend old ones, explains constitutional historian Leonard W. Levy in this fascinating history of the origins of the Bill of Rights. Unencumbered by a rigid class system, an arbitrary government, or a single established church squelching dissent, colonial Americans understood freedom in a far more comprehensive and liberal way than the English, Levy shows. He offers here a panoramic view of the liberties secured by the first ten amendments to the Constitution--a penetrating analysis of the background of the Bill of Rights the meanings of each provision of the amendments.

    In colonial America, political theory, law, and religion all taught that government was limited. Yet the framing and ratification of the Bill of Rights--in effect a bill of restraints upon the national government--was by no means assured. Levy illuminates the behind-the-scenes maneuverings, public rhetoric, and political motivations that led to each provision. The omission of a bill of rights in the original constitution presented the most serious obstacle to its adoption, despite Federalist claims that a bill of rights was unnecessary. Opponents of the Constitution claimed that inclusion of only some liberties--such as the right to habeas corpus and freedom from ex post facto laws--meant that all other liberties would be lost. But, Levy demonstrates, the people of the United States, aided by a persistent James Madison and by traditions of freedom, had the good sense to support both the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

  • Since 1950 - Art and its Critism

    In a series of compelling and finely argued essays on late twentieth-century art and the critical perspectives it has generated, Charles Harrison offers an acute analysis of the seismic shift that took place when the modernist formalism that had underpinned thinking about art in the first half of the century came to be seen as a spent force. Harrison's principal concern in this book is with the circumstances and consequences of that shift - in thought about art, and in criticism. He asks how the diverse art of this period is to be understood and on what basis judgments are to be made about the merits and importance of specific works. The twelve essays that compose the book were written over a period of twenty years and range from a revaluation of the work of Ben Nicholson, through a detailed account of English sculpture in the 1960s and 1970s, to commentary on the recent expansionist tendencies of modern art institutions. They represent a sustained attempt to examine the nature of modernism in art - both its successes and its failures - and to understand the changes that have followed the international Conceptual Art movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, among them a massive growth in the market and audience for modern art, and an erosion of the barriers between fine art and popular culture. Harrison considers the implications of these changes for the judgment and criticism of art. This is an original and incisive contribution to the discussion of modern and post-modern art and of the theories by which it has been influenced and explained, from someone who has been closely involved in the art of this period as practitioner, teacher, critic and historian.

  • Grand Scale - Monumental Prints in the Age of Durer and Titian

    Grand Scale brings to light rare surviving examples of mural-size prints - a Renaissance art form nearly lost from historical record. The most famous sixteenth-century woodcuts, engravings, and etchings were those done on an intimate scale. Yet artists also worked in an entirely different category of print production, producing mural-size prints that sometimes reached as high as ten feet. This handsome book, which features nearly fifty examples from Italy, Germany, France and the Netherlands, explores these multi-block woodcut and multi-plate engraving ensembles as vital contributions to the visual culture of their time. Comprising five essays, Grand Scale documents the relationship of monumental prints to the history of prints in general and also to mapmaking, painting, and book illustration, while addressing image design and modular printing from multiple, repeating blocks.

  • Representing Justice - The Creation and Fragility of Courts in Democracies

    By mapping the remarkable run of the icon of Justice, a woman with scales and sword, and by tracing the development of public spaces dedicated to justice, the authors explore the evolution of adjudication into its modern form as well as the intimate relationship between the courts and democracy. The authors analyze how Renaissance rites of judgment turned into democratic rights, requiring governments to respect judicial independence, provide open and public hearings, and accord access and dignity to every person. With over 220 images, readers can see both the longevity of aspirations for justice and the transformation of courts, as well as understand that, while venerable, courts are also vulnerable institutions that should not be taken for granted.

  • The Last Sane Man - Michael Cardew - Modern Pots, Colonialism and Counterculture

    British studio potter Michael Cardew (1901-1983) was a man of paradox, a modernist who disliked modernity, a colonial servant who despised Empire, and an intellectual who worked with his hands. After graduating from Oxford in 1923, he made majestic slipware alongside legendary potter Bernard Leach. Wartime service in Ghana made Cardew fiercely critical of British overseas policies; he remained in West Africa intermittently until 1965, founding a local tradition of stoneware. Beginning in the late 1960s, he travelled through Australia and North America, teaching pottery and demonstrating against racism and its consequences. By the time of his death, he had established himself as one of the finest 20th-century potters and as a voice of political dissent and counterculture. This is the first biography of his remarkable life. Harrod's engaging narrative includes interviews with friends, students, and Cardew's two surviving sons. Also included are previously unpublished photographs of Cardew and his family, as well as colour images of his work.

  • Empire Without End - Antiquities Collections in Renaissance Rome 1350-1527

    In the early fifteenth century, when Romans discovered ancient marble sculptures and inscriptions in the ruins, they often melted them into mortar. A hundred years later, however, antique marbles had assumed their familiar role as works of art displayed in private collections. Many of these collections, especially the Vatican Belvedere, are well known to art historians and archaeologists. Yet discussions of antiquities collecting in Rome too often begin with the Belvedere - that is, only after it was a widespread practice. In this important book, the author steps back to examine the 'long' fifteenth century, a critical period in the history of antiquities collecting that has received scant attention. Kathleen Wren Christian examines shifts in the response of artists and writers to spectacular archaeological discoveries and the new role of collecting antiquities in the public life of Roman elites. She discusses the exemplary and political values of the antique celebrated in the era of Petrarch and the invention of fictive ancient ancestors as a rationale for collecting among the Roman nobility. She considers the unique contributions of Pomponio Leto's Academy to the invention of the antiquarian garden and shows how popes and cardinals came to dominate Rome's collecting scene, paying particular attention to the theatrical performances and banqueting rituals staged in ever larger, more elaborate sculpture gardens. The first part of the book concludes with the Sack of Rome in 1527, which brought about the dispersal of many of Rome's antiquities collections.

  • The Buildings of Renaissance Venice - Patrons, Architects and Builders c. 1430-1500

    This book brings to life the story of the construction of some of the most outstanding early Renaissance buildings in Venice. Through a series of individual case studies, Richard J. Goy explores how and why great buildings came to be built. He addresses the practical issues of constructing such buildings as the Torre dell'Orologio in Piazza San Marco, the Arsenale Gate, and the churches of Santa Maria della Carita and San Zaccaria, focusing particular attention on the process of patronage.
    The book is the first to trace the complete process of creating important buildings, from the earliest conception in the minds of the patrons--the Venetian state or other institutional patrons--through the choice of architect, the employment of craftsmen, and the selection of materials. In an interesting analysis of the participants' roles, Goy highlights the emerging importance of the superintending master, the protomaestro.

  • Cumbria - Cumberland, Westmorland and Furness

    This fully revised volume brings together the historic counties of Cumberland and Westmorland with the old Furness division of Lancashire, in a comprehensive architectural guide to one of Englands most varied and rewarding regions. At its heart is the Lake District, where the well-loved vernacular architecture is overlaid by centuries of buildings, Georgian to modern, that respond in diverse ways to the magnificent landscape. The less familiar areas outside the National Park have an equal fascination, with numerous historic towns, spectacular industrial monuments, and distinctive traditions of church-building and fortified great houses. Fine Victorian and Arts-and-Crafts architecture can be found throughout, much of it published here for the first time.

  • The Making of the English Gardener - Plants, Books and Inspiration, 1550-1660

    In the century between the accession of Elizabeth I and the restoration of Charles II, a horticultural revolution took place in England. Ideas were exchanged across networks of gardeners, botanists, scholars, and courtiers, and the burgeoning vernacular book trade spread this new knowledge still further - reaching the growing number of gardeners furnishing their more modest plots across the nation and its young colonies in the Americas. Margaret Willes introduces a plethora of garden enthusiasts, from the renowned to the legions of anonymous workers who created and tended the great estates. Packed with illustrations from the herbals, design treatises and practical manuals that inspired these men - and occasionally women - Willes' book charts how England's garden grew.

  • Gilbert Rohde - Modern Design for Modern Living

    Few designers did more to influence the appearance of postwar American interiors than the furniture designer Gilbert Rohde (1894-1944). This first in-depth book on Rohde explores how he brought an industrial design perspective to the furniture industry and, in the process, introduced modernism to a broad range of Americans, especially through his modular furnishings. By tracing his career at the Herman Miller Furniture Company, where Rohde was a designer in the 1930s and 1940s, Phyllis Ross places his work in a broad cultural and economic context. The book shows how Rohde's focus on comfort, informality, multi-functionality, and flexibility transposed European design antecedents into furnishings suitable for American lifestyles. A champion of modular components, he experimented with new industrial materials, including Plexiglas, and produced furniture with biomorphic forms. Not only did Rohde introduce modern designs, but he also devised a complete merchandising strategy for their promotion. Today Rohde's furniture and decorative designs are coveted by collectors. The story of his career rounds out our understanding of his fascinating contributions to American culture.

  • Surrey

    Surrey's architecture is a constantly surprising mix of the rural and urban with many of its most important buildings, such as the seventeenth-century Ham House, found amongst the outgrowth of London itself. The landscape gardens of Painshill and Claremont attest to Surrey's popularity in the eighteenth century and the county's enthusiasm for follies and remarkable garden buildings. More recent architecture includes notable early works by Lutyens, with gardens by Gertrude Jekyll, inspired by the rich stock of late medieval farmhouses and tile-hung cottages in the county's southern villages. Among interwar suburban housing there are some exceptional Modernist homes, such as The Homewood by Patrick Gwynne. Church architecture in Surrey includes work by all of the great names of the Gothic Revival; not least of its surprises is the luminous and spacious interior of Guildford Cathedral.

  • Art of the Twentieth Century - A Reader

    This reader, a companion to The Open University's four-volume Art of the Twentieth Century series, offers a variety of writings by art historians and art theorists. The writings were originally published as freestanding essays or chapters in books, and they reflect the diversity of art historical interpretations and theoretical approaches to twentieth-century art.

    Accessible to the general reader, this book may be read independently or to supplement the materials explored in the four course texts. The volume includes a general introduction as well as a brief introduction to each piece, outlining its origin and relevance.

  • Regulating from Nowhere - Environmental Law and the Search for Objectivity

    Drawing insight from cross-disciplinary sources, Douglas Kysar exposes a critical flaw in the dominant environmental law and policy paradigm of risk assessment and cost-benefit analysis. To compensate for the shortcomings he identifies, Kysar offers a novel defence of the precautionary principle and concludes by advocating a movement toward environmental constitutionalism in which the ability of life to flourish is always regarded as a luxury we can afford.

  • Reclaiming the Commons - Community Farms & Forests in a New England Town

    This book is a lively account of a community working to combat suburban sprawl, to protect a large part of the landscape as common land, and to enjoy the land productively in an ecologically sustainable way. Based on the practical experience of one New England town, the book urges suburban environmentalists to go beyond preserving open space to actively engaging people with the places where they live.

    Brian Donahue, an environmental historian, in 1980 was a founder of Land's Sake, a community farm in Weston, Massachusetts. Working with the town's Conservation Commission, Land's Sake cultivates a twenty-five-acre organic fruit, flower, and vegetable farm, makes apple cider and maple syrup, maintains a sixty-five-mile trail system, harvests firewood and timber from fifteen hundred acres of town forest, and has kept draft horses and sheep. Donahue recounts the joys and sorrows of farming the suburbs. But beneath the light hearted tales of sheep straying into tennis courts and middle-school students tapping sugar maples in the town cemetery runs an incisive ecological history of New England and a penetrating analysis of how to live responsibly with this difficult but rewarding land. Donahue concludes with a call for all places to protect common land and establish community farms--especially in the suburbs, where most Americans live and where, like it or not, environmentalists may make their most lasting mark on the world.

  • Law′s Environment - How the Law Shapes the Places We Live

    In this insightful book, John Copeland Nagle shows how our reliance on environmental law affects the natural environment through an examination of five diverse places in the American landscape: Adak Island far off the coast of western Alaska; the Susquehanna River running through New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland; Colton in California's Inland Empire; Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the badlands of North Dakota; and, Alamogordo in southern New Mexico. Nagle asks why some places are preserved by the law while others are not, and he finds that environmental laws often have unexpected results while other laws have surprising effects on the environment. Nagle argues that sound environmental policy requires better coordination among the many laws, regulations and social norms that determine the values and uses of our scarce lands and waters.

  • Lucie Rie - Modernist Potter

    Lucie Rie (1902-1995), one of the 20th century's most celebrated and iconic potters, combined an acute understanding of modernism with the skills of her chosen craft. During the course of her sixty-year career, she continually honed and refined her work, developing new shapes and surface effects that were distinctly her own. Her delicately shaped bowls, bottles, and other vessels reflect her commitment to simplicity and clarity of form, earning her both critical and popular acclaim.

    This comprehensive biography follows Rie's life and artistic development from her birth into the Austria of the Habsburgs to her studies at the progressive Kunstgewerbeschule in Vienna, and finally her years in Britain following her escape in 1938 from Nazi-controlled Austria. Emmanuel Cooper, a distinguished potter who knew Rie, interviewed many of her friends and acquaintances to produce this complete and detailed account of Rie's life and work. The author has been given unrestricted access by the Rie estate to previously unpublished letters and other material, which provide fascinating new insights into her life and work and have allowed him to reevaluate Rie's creative output within the broader context of modernism and the emergence of the studio pottery movement in Britain.

  • San Martin - Argentinian Soldier, American Hero

    Jose de San Martin (1778-1850) was an enigmatic figure - a revolutionary and a conservative, a professional soldier and an intellectual, a taciturn man who nevertheless was able to inspire the peoples of South America to follow his armies and accept his battle strategies. One of the great leaders in the wars for independence, he was a pivotal force in the liberation of Chile and Peru from Spanish rule. In the first full English-language biography of San Martin in more than half a century, John Lynch shines new light on San Martin and on the story of Spanish America's revolutionary wars. Lynch offers a series of dramatic set pieces: the Peninsular War, in which San Martin fought the French and learned his military skills; the crossing of the Andes, when his army battled the forces of nature as well as enemy fire; the confrontation with imperial Spain in Peru; and the standoff with Bolivar which led to San Martin's resignation and exile in Europe. Based on the latest documentation, this book enhances our understanding of the modern history of Latin America and one of its most brilliant leaders.

  • The Saxophone - Yale Musical Instrument Series

    In the first fully comprehensive study of one of the world's most iconic musical instruments, Stephen Cottrell examines the saxophone's various social, historical, and cultural trajectories, and illustrates how and why this instrument, with its idiosyncratic shape and sound, became important for so many different music-makers around the world.

    After considering what led inventor Adolphe Sax to develop this new musical wind instrument, Cottrell explores changes in saxophone design since the 1840s before examining the instrument's role in a variety of contexts: in the military bands that contributed so much to the saxophone's global dissemination during the nineteenth century; as part of the rapid expansion of American popular music around the turn of the twentieth century; in classical and contemporary art music; in world and popular music; and, of course, in jazz, a musical style with which the saxophone has become closely identified.

  • The Perfect Medium - Photography and the Occult

    The mesmerizing photographic history of occult phenomena, from levitations and apparitions to spectres, ghosts, and auras.

    In the early days of photography, many believed and hoped that the camera would prove more efficient than the human eye in capturing the unseen. Spiritualists and animists of the nineteenth century seized on the new technology as a method of substantiating the existence of supernatural beings and happenings. This fascinating book assembles more than 250 photographic images from the Victorian era to the 1960s, each purporting to document an occult phenomenon: levitations, apparitions, transfigurations, ectoplasms, spectres, ghosts, and auras. Drawn from the archives of European and American occult societies and private and public collections, the photographs in many cases have never before been published.


    The Perfect Medium studies these rare and remarkable photographs through cultural, historical, and artistic lenses. More than mere curiosities, the images on film are important records of the cultural forces and technical methods that brought about their production. They document in unexpected ways a period when developing photographic technology merged with a popular obsession with the occult to create a new genre of haunting experimental photographs.

  • Nature - Cosmic, Human, and Divine

    This volume is based upon the sixth series of lectures delivered at Yale University on the Foundation established by the late Dwight H. Terry of Plymouth, Connecticut, through his gift of an endowment fund for the delivery and subsequent publication of "Lectures on Religion in the Light of Science and Philosophy." The deed of gift declares that "the object of this Foundation is not the promotion of scientific investigation and discovery, but rather the assimilation and interpretation of that which has been or shall be hereafter discovered, and its application to human welfare, especially by the building of the truths of science and philosophy into the structure of a broadened and purified religion.

  • Fundamentals of Infrared Detector Operation and Testing

    A close look at early-20th-century New York City through the eyes of Ashcan artist John Sloan

    John Sloan (1871-1951) began his career as a commercial newspaper artist in Philadelphia where he studied with Robert Henri. Following Henri to New York, Sloan joined a small circle of eight talented artists whose dissatisfaction with the dominating National Academy led to a protest exhibit in 1908, the emergence of a powerful movement for change in American art, and ultimately to the famous Armory Show of 1913. It was in part Sloan's dark palette and views of city streets and working-class life that gave rise to the epithet now used to describe the works of the "Ashcan School." Sloan's compelling images of New York City are the subject of this generously illustrated book. His paintings, drawings, and prints clearly reflect his own experience of the city as he walked its neighborhoods and observed human dramas played out in streets and apartments. The contributors to the volume investigate a variety of topics, including Sloan's understanding of the urban experience in America, his interest in social reform, his fascination with moving pictures and cinema aesthetics, and his relationship with Henri. The authors also situate Sloan's paintings within the geography and social fabric of New York. John Sloan's New York presents a unique perspective on New York and its people and also on the artist himself, who was captivated by the soul of the city.

  • Flemish Art and Architecture 1585-1700 - Yale Pelican Histroy of Art Series

    This illustrated book provides a complete overview of the art of the Southern Netherlands from 1585 to 1700, the years between the separation of the Southern from Northern provinces and the end of Spanish rule. Eminent Flemish art historian Hans Vlieghe examines the development of Flemish and specifically Antwerp painting, the activity and influence of Rubens and such other leading masters as Van Dyck and Jordaens, the Antwerp tradition of specialisation among painters, and the sculpture and architecture of this period. He also describes the socio-economic and political conditions that facilitated the rise, evolution, and expansion of Flemish art, focusing particularly on the Counter Reformation, which stimulated the construction and decoration of new churches according to rules set out by the Council of Trent.

  • Ideology and U.S. Foreign Policy

    This new edition of Michael H. Hunt's classic reinterpretation of American diplomatic history includes a preface that reflects on the personal experience and intellectual agenda behind the writing of the book, surveys the broad impact of the book's argument, and addresses the challenges to the thesis since the book's original publication. In the wake of 9/11, this interpretation is more pertinent than ever.

  • The Arts and the Creation of Mind

    Although the arts are often thought to be closer to the rim of education than to its core, they are, surprisingly, critically important means for developing complex and subtle aspects of the mind, argues Elliot Eisner in this engrossing book. In it he describes how various forms of thinking are evoked, developed, and refined through the arts. These forms of thinking, Eisner argues, are more helpful in dealing with the ambiguities and uncertainties of daily life than are the formally structured curricula that are employed today in schools.

    Offering a rich array of examples, Eisner describes different approaches to the teaching of the arts and the virtues each possesses when well taught. He discusses especially nettlesome issues pertaining to the evaluation of performance in the arts. Perhaps most important, Eisner provides a fresh and admittedly iconoclastic perspective on what the arts can contribute to education, namely a new vision of both its aims and its means. This new perspective, Eisner argues, is especially important today, a time at which mechanistic forms of technical rationality often dominate our thinking about the conduct and assessment of education.

  • Colour of Paradise - The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires

    Among the magnificent gems and jewels left behind by the great Islamic empires, emeralds stand out for their size and prominence. For the Mughals, Ottomans, and Safavids green was - as it remains for all Muslims - the colour of Paradise, reserved for the Prophet Muhammad and his descendants. Tapping a wide range of sources, Kris Lane traces the complex web of global trading networks that funnelled emeralds from backland South America to populous Asian capitals between the sixteenth and the eighteenth centuries. Lane reveals the bloody conquest wars and forced labour regimes that accompanied their production. It is a story of trade, but also of transformations - how members of profoundly different societies at opposite ends of the globe assigned value to a few thousand pounds of imperfectly shiny green rocks.

  • Newcastle and Gateshead - Pevsner City Guide

    This book offers a lively and authoritative survey of the buildings of Tyneside, from the medieval castle and cathedral at Newcastle to the spectacular buildings spearheading the renaissance of Gateshead on the river's south bank. Both urban centres are explored in a series of walks, including the magnificent 1830s replanning of Newcastle, comparable in quality and ambition to anything in Georgian Edinburgh or Bath. The famous Tyne bridges also receive detailed treatment, with other historic engineering structures from this consistently rewarding and surprising area. A selection of suburban walks is included, together with excursions to Anglo-Saxon Jarrow, medieval Tynemouth, and the celebrated Angel of the North. The book is illustrated throughout with specially commissioned photographs, maps, and historic views.

  • In and Out of the Marital Bed - Seeing Sex in Renaissance Art

    This book explores images whose sexual content has all too often been either ignored or denied. Each chapter is devoted to a place that artists associated with sexual activity or desire: the bed, the dressing area of the home, the window and doorway, the bath, and the street. By examining both canonical works, such as Jan van Eyck's 'Arnolfini Portrait' and Petrus Christus's 'Goldsmith's Shop' and long-neglected objects, such as combs, badges and bathhouse murals, and by investigating a wide range of subjects - same-sex desire, adultery, marriage, courtship and prostitution - Diane Wolfthal demonstrates how illicit forms of sexuality were linked to the 'chaste sexuality' of marriage. Wofthal shows how both church and state attempted to regulate sexual conduct, and she examines those sources not only that reinforced this way of thinking, but also that resisted or subverted it. The insistence that sexual intercourse be confined to marriage, performed in a particular way and reserved for purposes of procreation is shown to be subverted and undermined both in the imagery produced around the subject, and in the reality itself.

  • Eva Hesse Catalogue Raisonne - Paintings V 1 and Sculpture V 2, 2V Set

    The first two volumes of a highly anticipated four-volume catalogue raisonne of all known works by Eva Hesse

    The work of Eva Hesse (1936-1970) has been the focus of growing attention over the past few decades. With recent major exhibitions in San Francisco, London, and Wiesbaden, Hesse's tremendous contribution to the art world of the 1960s and '70s is now recognized by scholars and the general public alike.

    These two lavishly produced volumes are the first in a major new publishing initiative: a four-volume catalogue raisonne of Hesse's known artwork in all media: painting, sculpture, and works on paper. During her career, Hesse created 135 paintings and 176 sculptures, objects, and test pieces. As her paintings are less well known than her sculptures, Volume I will be a revelation to many. Revealed here are 28 previously unknown paintings, including works that date from her time as an art student at Yale University.

    Hesse's sculpture is more widely known but is presented here anew with many recently commissioned photographs and fascinating archival images. Twenty-one previously unknown sculptures are presented in Volume II, including two painted wooden boxes presumably made in New York in 1964, in which the first signs of Hesse's shift from painting to sculpture occurred, and numerous previously unknown test pieces.

  • John Marin - Modernism at Midcentury

    Since his early work was first embraced by Alfred Stieglitz, John Marin (1870-1953) has been recognized as one of America's foremost watercolorists. During the last two decades of Marin's career, however, oil painting played a greater role in his studio practice. Marin's engagement with oil was liberating, eventually yielding a more fluid, linear, and calligraphic style.

    This beautiful publication is the first to focus exclusively on Marin's output from the 1930s through the early 1950s, a corpus of nearly seventy works, which has been generally overlooked in art historical literature. Debra Bricker Balken resituates these works within the discourses of midcentury modernism, convincingly arguing that critics--such as Clement Greenberg--saw them as important precursors to Abstract Expressionism, influencing such artists as Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock. Marin's painted abstractions of the Maine coast and Manhattan architecture were singled out for their invention, singularity, and authority, and forecast the new language of Abstract Expressionism.

  • Architecture and Society in Normandy 1120-1270

    This wide-ranging book explores the architecture--principally ecclesiastical--of Normandy from 1120 to 1270, a period of profound social, cultural, and political change. In 1204, control of the duchy of Normandy passed from the hands of the Anglo-Norman/Angevin descendants of William the Conqueror to the Capetian kingdom of France. The book examines the enormous cultural impact of this political change and places the architecture of the time in the context of the Normans' complicated sense of their own identity. It is the first book to consider the inception and development of gothic architecture in Normandy and the first to establish a reliable chronology of buildings.

    Lindy Grant extends her investigation beyond the buildings themselves and also offers an account of those who commissioned, built, and used them. The humanized story she tells provides sharp insights not only into Normandy's medieval architecture, but also into the fascinating society from which it emerged.

  • Landmark Of The Spirit - The Eldridge Street Synagogue

    The first major history of the gloriously restored Eldridge Street Synagogue, the first synagogue in the United States built by east European Jews, has a seminal place in the history of American Jewry.

    New York City's magnificent Eldridge Street Synagogue was built in 1887 in response to the great wave of Jewish immigrants who fled persecution in eastern Europe. Finding their way to the Lower East Side, the new arrivals formed a vibrant Jewish community that flourished from the 1850s until the 1940s. Their synagogue served not only as a place of worship but also as a singularly important center in the development of American Judaism.

    A near ruin in the 1980s that was recently reopened after a massive twenty-year restoration, the Eldridge Street Synagogue has been named a National Historic Landmark. But as Bill Moyers tells us in his foreword, the synagogue is also "a landmark of the spirit, . . . the spirit of a new nation committed to the old idea of liberty."

    Annie Polland uses elements of the building's architecture--the facade, the benches, the grooves worn into the sanctuary floor--as points of departure to discuss themes, people, and trends at various moments in the synagogue's history, particularly during its heyday from 1887 until the 1930s. Exploring the synagogue's rich archives, the author shines new light on the religious life of immigrant Jews, introduces various rabbis, cantors and congregants, and analyzes the significance of this special building in the context of the larger American-Jewish experience.

    For more information, go to: www.EldridgeStreet.org

  • The Riverside Gardens of Thomas More′s London

    All but forgotten today, eight historic gardens that once flourished along the length of the Thames in early Tudor London are here historically recreated and analyzed in this richly illustrated book. One of the gardens belonged to Sir Thomas More, and the others to politically powerful friends and acquaintances of his. The stories of these long-lost gardens, brought together here for the first time, shed new light not only on London's garden history and that of its first gardeners but also on the lives and outlooks of some of the most important figures within and around the court of Henry VIII.

    The locations of these gardens range from the Tower of London to More's own country manor at Chelsea, from Cardinal Wolsey's York Place in Westminster (later transformed into Whitehall Palace by Henry VIII) to Hampton Court. More than any single garden could, the group of eight riverside gardens illuminates not only the practical realities but also the political importance of gardens. The book explores in detail the gardens that More knew so well and shows how their histories are intimately connected to his own.

  • The Statue of Liberty - A Transatlantic Story

    A stirring new history of Lady Liberty, from its creation in France to its renewed significance in the post-9/11 years

    A universally recognized icon, the Statue of Liberty is perhaps the most beloved of all American symbols. Yet no one living in 1885, when the crated monument arrived in New York Harbor, could have foreseen the central place the Statue of Liberty would come to occupy in the American imagination. With the particular insights of a cultural historian and scholar of French history, Edward Berenson tells the little-known stories of the statue's improbable beginnings, transatlantic connections, and the changing meanings it has held for each successive American generation.

    Berenson begins with the French intellectuals who decided for their own domestic political reasons to pay monumental tribute to American liberty. Without any official backing, they designed the statue, announced the gift, and determined where it should go. The initial American response, not surprisingly, was less than enthusiastic, and the project had to overcome countless difficulties before the statue was at last unveiled to the public in New York Harbor in 1886. The trials of its inception and construction, however, are only half of the story. Berenson shows that the statue's symbolically indistinct, neoclassical form has allowed Americans to interpret its meaning in diverse ways: as representing the emancipation of the slaves, Tocqueville's idea of orderly liberty, opportunity for "huddled masses," and, in the years since 9/11, the freedom and resilience of New York City and the United States in the face of terror.

  • Empires of the Atlantic World - Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830

    An enthralling account of the entwined histories of Britain, Spain, and their empires in the Americas

    This epic history compares the empires built by Spain and Britain in the Americas, from Columbus's arrival in the New World to the end of Spanish colonial rule in the early nineteenth century. J. H. Elliott, one of the most distinguished and versatile historians working today, offers us history on a grand scale, contrasting the worlds built by Britain and by Spain on the ruins of the civilizations they encountered and destroyed in North and South America. Elliott identifies and explains both the similarities and differences in the two empires' processes of colonization, the character of their colonial societies, their distinctive styles of imperial government, and the independence movements mounted against them. Based on wide reading in the history of the two great Atlantic civilizations, the book sets the Spanish and British colonial empires in the context of their own times and offers us insights into aspects of this dual history that still influence the Americas.

  • Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa's Greatest Explorer

    A rousing biography of the most brilliant--and misunderstood--adventurer in the great age of exploration

    Henry Morton Stanley, so the tale goes, was a cruel imperialist who connived with King Leopold II of Belgium in horrific crimes against the people of the Congo. He also conducted the most legendary celebrity interview in history, opening with, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" But these perceptions are not quite true, Tim Jeal shows in this grand and colorful biography. With unprecedented access to previously closed Stanley family archives, Jeal reveals the amazing extent to which Stanley's public career and intimate life have been misunderstood and undervalued. Jeal recovers the reality of Stanley's life--a life of almost impossible extremes--in this moving story of tragedy, adventure, disappointment, and success.

    Few have started life as disadvantaged as Stanley. Rejected by both parents and consigned to a Welsh workhouse, he emigrated to America as a penniless eighteen-year-old. Jeal vividly re-creates Stanley's rise to success, his friendships and romantic relationships, and his life-changing decision to assume an American identity. Stanley's epic but unfairly forgotten African journeys are thrillingly described, establishing the explorer as the greatest to set foot on the continent. Few biographies can claim so thoroughly to reappraise a reputation; few portray a more extraordinary historical figure.

  • Reinventing Ritual - Contemporary Art and Design for Jewish Life

    A guidebook to the most current trends in contemporary Jewish art and design, 'Reinventing Ritual' provides an unprecedented look at the work and thought of contemporary artists as they respond to the needs and practices of traditional culture. Beautifully illustrated with new art from Israel, Europe, and the Americas, this publication features both traditional and avant-garde sculpture, textiles, architecture, metalwork and ceramics by forty leading artists. Author Daniel Belasco surveys current trends in Jewish ritual art and the influences of feminism, environmentalism, multiculturalism and new media; Julie Lasky provides a groundbreaking discussion of the role of recycling and social consciousness in contemporary Jewish design; Danya Ruttenberg, a recently ordained rabbi, offers a lively perspective on the constantly evolving Jewish impulse 'to concretize the encounter with the Divine'; Arnold M. Eisen writes an absorbing and personal commentary on the role of ritual in Jewish life today; and, Tamar Rubin contributes an illustrated timeline covering key Jewish cultural and historical events from 1994 to 2008.

  • The Unicorn Tapestries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    This unicorn tapestries are one of the most popular attractions at The Cloisters, the medieval branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Written by a world authority on medieval textiles, this beautifully illustrated book traces the origins of the seven enigmatic tapestries as well as the possible interpretations of their symbolism and presents details of each imaginatively woven scene.

  • The Jaharis Gospel Lectionary - The Story of a Byzantine Book

    Until 2008 the 'Jaharis Lectionary' was a hidden treasure: an illuminated Byzantine manuscript that was almost entirely unknown, even to scholars. Superbly preserved, it is arguably the most important Byzantine work to come to the Metropolitan Museum's renowned collection since the 1917 gifts of J. Pierpont Morgan. It represents the apogee of Constantinopolitan craftsmanship around the year 1100. In this important study, John Lowden, a leading expert on Byzantine manuscripts, discusses his discoveries about this extraordinary manuscript within the broader context of Byzantine book illumination. He traces the book's history from its acquisition to its production in Constantinople. By detailed analysis and comparison, the author shows how the manuscript was made for use in the patriarchal church of Hagia Sophia.

  • Galatians

    As its predecessors in the Anchor Bible series have done "Galatians" successfully makes available all the significant historical and linguistic knowledge which bears on the interpretation of this important New Testament book. A personal letter written by Paul in the mid-first century to friends in the churches emerging in the region of Galatia, where it was circulated, Galatians is down to earth and pragmatic. This biblical book requires the modern reader to take a seat in one of the Galatian congregations, to listen to Paul's letter with Galatian ears, and discern the contours of Paul's theology.

    That is exactly what Dr. Martyn makes possible in his marvelous commentary, with its careful translation and creative interpretation of Galatians. Though relatively brief, Paul's letter is filled with complex theological and historical issues that demand a thorough treatment. Readers will not be disappointed in Dr. Martyn's sensitive handling of difficult passages, and all will be delighted to have a fresh translation that makes sense to our modern ears.

    All in all, this volume will stand out as a shining example of top notch scholarship written for the general reader.

  • Drawn to Enchant - Original Children′s Book Art in the Betsy Beinecke Shirley Collection

    Betsy Beinecke Shirley, one of the great collectors of American children's literature, gathered a peerless collection of books, original illustrations, manuscripts, and ephemera. This gorgeously illustrated book presents over 200 selected original artworks from the enchanting collection she bequeathed to the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Yale University.

    Guiding the reader on a lively tour through the stages of childhood reading, this volume begins with ABCs and nursery books. It continues through adventure stories, magazines, and more, then concludes with a miscellany section of wonderful odds and ends. The delightfully varied images demonstrate how children's books evolved, from the nation's first days of independence to our own times. Artists whose works are represented include many beloved favorites, among them Ludwig Bemelmans, Maurice Sendak, A. B. Frost, Wanda Gag, Peter Newell, N. C. Wyeth, Tony Sarg, Robert Lawson, and Johnny Gruelle.

    From variant illustrations for Goodnight Moon and Where the Wild Things Are to little-known sketches for nineteenth-century periodicals that delighted generations of children, Drawn to Enchant offers a unique opportunity to study the reading lives of children throughout American history. Just as important, it invites each reader to recollect favorite images from the treasured books of his or her own childhood.

  • Cuneiform Texts From Various Collections

    Features 217 cuneiform texts, found in small collections throughout the world, that date from the late third to the late first millennia BCE and includes inscriptions, letters, administrative documents, and literary works in Akkadian and Sumerian.

  • A Photographic Guide to the Birds of Japan and North-East Asia

    Encompassing a spectacular variety of environments--from boreal areas to subtropical islands, from dense woodlands to open seas--Japan is home to a rich array of bird species. This up-to-date and brilliantly photographed guide covers nearly 600 species of birds found in Japan and north-east Asia, including resident and migrant species as well as vagrants that are seen with some regularity. Any visitor with an interest in locating, identifying, or photographing birds will find this book an indispensable companion when traveling in the region.
    Succinct entries for each species describe important identification features, various plumages, how to distinguish similar species, and where, when, and how frequently to expect sightings. Each entry includes one or more superb photographs and a user-friendly range map.
    Featured in this guide:
    - Key facts for identifying nearly 600 bird species found in Japan, Korea, north-east China, and the Russian far east
    - Over 1500 superb color photographs of wild birds
    - Information on a wide range of avian habitats, including alpine areas, coastal waters, tidal flats, mixed and evergreen forests, wetlands, cultivated fields, and urban areas
    - An overview of conservation issues

  • Hollow Justice - A History of Indigenous Claims in the United States

    This book, the first of its kind, comprehensively explores Native American claims against the United States government over the past two centuries. Despite the federal government's multiple attempts to redress indigenous claims, a close examination reveals that even when compensatory programs were instituted, Native peoples never attained a genuine sense of justice. David E. Wilkins addresses the important question of what one nation owes another when the balance of rights, resources, and responsibilities have been negotiated through treaties. How does the United States assure that guarantees made to tribal nations, whether through a century old treaty or a modern day compact, remain viable and lasting?

  • The Unbounded Home - Property Values Beyond Property Lines

    The Unbounded Home grapples with a core metropolitan reality - that the value and meaning of a home extend beyond its property lines to schools, shops, parks, services, transportation, neighbours, neighbourhood aesthetics, and even market conditions. Lee Anne Fennell unpacks the resulting tension between the homeowner's desire for personal autonomy at home and the impulse to control what happens in surrounding areas to safeguard the home's value. The stakes are high; this conundrum carries implications for nearly every facet of residential life, including the many neighbourhoods in the United States that are segregated by race and social class. Fennell shows how a new understanding of homeownership and innovations that increase the flexibility of property law can address critical issues of neighbourhood control and community composition that have been simmering unresolved for decades.

  • Frank Stella 1958

    For Frank Stella, 1958 was a crucial year. After graduating from Princeton University, he moved to Manhattan and painted a series of monumental, colourful canvases that culminated in the first of his famous 'black paintings'. This fascinating book focuses on the thirty works he painted that year. The paintings reflect his transformation from a student experimenting with abstract expressionism to a highly original artist whose works changed the course of postwar art. Presenting the entire series of paintings in colour for the first time (except lost works known only through black-and-white photographs), this handsome book details the course of Stella's career in 1958. The authors situate his work in relation to that of Carl Andre, with whom Stella shared studio space that year and Jasper Johns. Their analysis draws on concepts of originality, repetition, assemblage and opticality. Drawing on new archival findings, firsthand observations of the paintings and interviews with Stella and members of his circle, this volume enriches our understanding of a fascinating and critical stage in the artist's development. Exhibition schedule: Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Harvard University Art Museums, 4 February to 16 July 2006.

  • On Kawara - 10 Tableaux and 16,952 Pages

    Since the mid-1960s, On Kawara (b. 1933) has objectively recorded his existence through everyday numbers, words, and found images. This handsomely designed and illustrated book presents works selected by the artist from throughout his illustrious career, including paintings made at the time of the 1969 moon landings, other large-scale paintings, a 100 Years Calendar, and a vast array of his own books that chronicle his extensive travels, acquaintances, and personal readings. The book features a translation of an essay on the Apollo space mission and its impact on human consciousness by Takafumi Matsui; a chapter from Ervin Laszlo's The Whispering Pond, which presents theories of understanding possible connections between mind and matter; and a new essay by Charles Wylie that discusses the specifics of Kawara's corresponding installation at the Dallas Museum of Art and Kawara's contribution to and divergence from the main currents of art practice in the past five decades.

  • The New Eugenics: Selective Breeding in an Era of Reproductive Technologies

    A provocative examination of how unequal access to reproductive technology replays the sins of the eugenics movement

    Eugenics, the effort to improve the human species by inhibiting reproduction of "inferior" genetic strains, ultimately came to be regarded as the great shame of the Progressive movement. Judith Daar, a prominent expert on the intersection of law and medicine, argues that current attitudes toward the potential users of modern assisted reproductive technologies threaten to replicate eugenics' same discriminatory practices.

    In this book, Daar asserts how barriers that block certain people's access to reproductive technologies are often founded on biases rooted in notions of class, race, and marital status. As a result, poor, minority, unmarried, disabled, and LGBT individuals are denied technologies available to well-off nonminority heterosexual applicants. An original argument on a highly emotional and important issue, this work offers a surprising departure from more familiar arguments on the issue as it warns physicians, government agencies, and the general public against repeating the mistakes of the past.

  • Norfolk 2 - North-West & South

    This second volume on Norfolk provides a comprehensive survey from prehistoric times to the present day. The 17th- and 18th-century treasures of King's Lynn are explored, as well as the market towns of Swaffham and Wymondham. Castle remains and medieval churches are also explored.

  • Varieties of Modernism - Open University Art of the Twentieth Century Series V 3

    This book, the third in the Art of the Twentieth Century series, considers works of art produced in Europe and the United States between the 1930s and the 1960s. Arranged in four main parts, this abundantly illustrated book begins by examining aspects of the European avant-garde from the 1930s to the aftermath of the Second World War. The second part focuses on the emergence of Abstract Expressionism in the U.S., in particular the work of Jackson Pollock and important critics. Part three looks at "autonomous" high modernism of the early to mid-1960s and the contemporary, related modernist theorization of photography. The final part of the book addresses the reemergence in the 1950s and 1960s of the concerns of the 1920 avant-gardes operating in the so-called "gap between art and life."

  • How To Read Chinese Paintings

    The Chinese often use the expression du hua, "to read a painting," in connection with their study and appreciation of such works. This volume closely "reads" thirty-six masterpieces of Chinese painting from the encyclopedic collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in order to reveal the major characteristics and themes of this rich pictorial tradition. The book examines multiple layers of meaning--style, technique, symbolism, past traditions, and the artist's personal circumstances--through accessible texts and numerous large color details. A dynastic chronology, map, and list of further readings supplement the text.

    Spanning a thousand years of Chinese art, these landscapes, flowers, birds, figures, religious subjects, and calligraphies illuminate the main goal of every Chinese artist: to capture not only the outer appearance of a subject but also its inner essence.

  • Bacon and Sutherland

    Both Francis Bacon (1909-1992) and Graham Sutherland (1903-1980) were highly influential modern British artists, yet in temperament they could not have been more different. This book is the first to consider their intriguing artistic dialogue, offering a rich and subtle analysis of their work up to 1950. Martin Hammer's starting points are the strong stylistic and thematic affinities between Bacon's and Sutherland's work and the fascinating series of letters that Bacon wrote to Sutherland (transcribed in an appendix). Hammer considers the dynamics of the artists' relationship, their intertwined careers, and how they expressed the experience of living through the Second World War and the onset of the Cold War.

    How did these two artists engage with international modernism when much English art was narrowly insular and "patriotic?" In what ways did their art embody a creative response to Picasso and surrealism? The author investigates these and many other questions to illuminate the personal and professional relationship between two compelling twentieth-century artists.

  • William Wegman - Funney-Strange

    A comprehensive and intriguing look at the witty and sophisticated art of William Wegman, beloved by the general public and held in critical esteem within the international art world

    This fascinating book reveals the full range of William Wegman's art. Beloved by the general public for signature photographs of his troupe of Weimaraners, Wegman is also an immensely important figure in the contemporary art world.


    A pioneer video-maker, conceptualist, performer, photographer, painter, draftsman, and writer, Wegman moves fluidly among various media: from conceptual works to commissioned magazine shots; from videos shown in museums to television segments made for Sesame Street and Saturday Night Live; from artist's books parodying nineteenth-century naturalist studies to children's books revealing tongue-in-cheek portraits of town and country life; from photographic "landscapes" employing his canine muses to his most recent cycle of landscapes combining found scenic souvenir postcards with drawing, collage, and painting. Underlying all his creations is the light humor of "funny" mediating the darker human comedy of "strange." Speaking to the absurdities of daily life, Wegman's work is universally appealing.


    William Wegman: Funney--Strange is illustrated with some 250 images. It is the first retrospective volume to consider the artist's entire career from the 1960s to the 2000s and is an essential book for any fan of Wegman's work.

  • A Moon for the Misbegotten

    A new, affordable paperback edition of one O'Neill's late masterpieces

    Eugene O'Neill's last completed play, A Moon for the Misbegotten is a sequel to his autobiographical Long Day's Journey Into Night. Moon picks up eleven years after the events described in Long Day's Journey Into Night, asJim Tyrone (based on O'Neill's older brother Jamie) grasps at a last chance at love under the full moonlight. This paperback edition features an insightful introduction by Stephen A. Black, helpful to anyone who desires a deeper understanding of O'Neill's work.

  • Earthrise - How Man First Saw the Earth

    'Earthrise' tells the remarkable story of the first photographs of Earth from space and the totally unexpected impact of those images. The Apollo 'Earthrise' and 'Blue Marble' photographs were beamed across the world some forty years ago. They had an astounding effect, Robert Poole explains, and in fact transformed thinking about the Earth and its environment in a way that echoed throughout religion, culture and science. Gazing upon our whole planet for the first time, we saw ourselves and our place in the universe with new clarity. Poole delves into new areas of research and looks at familiar history from fresh perspectives. With intriguing anecdotes and wonderful pictures, he examines afresh the politics of the Apollo missions, the challenges of whole Earth photography and the story of the behind-the-scenes struggles to get photographs of the Earth put into mission plans. He traces the history of imagined visions of Earth from space and explores what happened when imagination met reality. The photographs of Earth represented a turning point, Poole contends. In their wake, Earth Day was inaugurated, the environmental movement took off, and the first space age ended. People turned their focus back toward Earth, toward the precious and fragile planet we call home.

  • Pyschotherapy Without the Self - A Buddist Perspective

    Insights on the interface between Buddhist teachings and Western psychotherapy by the best-selling author of Thoughts without a Thinker

    Immersed in Buddhist psychology prior to studying Western psychiatry, Dr. Mark Epstein first viewed Western therapeutic approaches through the lens of the East. This posed something of a challenge. Although both systems promise liberation through self-awareness, the central tenet of Buddha's wisdom is the notion of no-self, while the central focus of Western psychotherapy is the self. This book, which includes writings from the past twenty-five years, wrestles with the complex relationship between Buddhism and psychotherapy and offers nuanced reflections on therapy, meditation, and psychological and spiritual development. A best-selling author and popular speaker, Epstein has long been at the forefront of the effort to introduce Buddhist psychology to the West. His unique background enables him to serve as a bridge between the two traditions, which he has found to be more compatible than at first thought. Engaging with the teachings of the Buddha as well as those of Freud and Winnicott, he offers a compelling look at desire, anger, and insight and helps reinterpret the Buddha's Four Noble Truths and centralconcepts such as egolessness and emptiness in the psychoanalytic language of our time.

  • Childe Hassam, American Impressionist

    Childe Hassam (1859-1935) created an immense body of work in the Impressionist style, comprising oil paintings, watercolours, pastels, and prints. His distinctive and enchanting images, with their focus on effects of colour and light, are widely admired and are included in the collections of every major museum in the United States. In this handsomely illustrated book, the authors, all experts in the field, take a fresh look at Hassam's responses to his vibrant and complicated era. Their texts study his striking portrayals of cities and country sites in America and Europe. Also explored are his late works - those completed after 1900 - when Hassam felt increasingly challenged by both modern life and modern art. These include tranquil interior vignettes, iconic images of New England churches, and his great Flag series. Hassam's life and career in Boston, New York, Paris, New England, and East Hampton as well as his travels are covered in fresh and insightful chapters. Essays on more specific subjects focus on Hassam's pride in his ancestry; his interest in architecture, gardens and allegorical themes; his accomplishments as a watercolourist and printmaker; his frames; the marketing of his art; and the contemporary critical response to it. The book, which also contains a chronology of Hassam's career and a comprehensive exhibition chronology, accompanies the first major museum retrospective of Hassam's works since 1972. Childe Hassam, American Impressionist examines this great artist's work in the context of his credo that "the man who will go down to posterity is the man who paints his own time and the scenes of everyday life around him".

  • Modern Architecture - Representation and Reality

    In this handsome book, esteemed architectural historian Neil Levine investigates for the first time the complex history of representation - the use and meaning of architectural signifiers - from the 18th to the 20th century. Using the lens of a continuous theoretical argument, Levine provides a detailed survey and critical analysis of major works by a host of modern architects, including Etienne-Louis Boullee, Nicholas Hawksmoor, Louis Kahn, Henri Labrouste, Augustus Welby Pugin, Karl Friedrich Schinkel, John Soane, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, Eugene Viollet-le-Duc and Frank Lloyd Wright. Levine posits that all modern architects, much like visual artists, have had to grapple with issues of representation in their work. Interweaving influential examples from outside the scope of modern architecture, Levine traces the history of representation in architecture, and in writings on architecture, both within each architect's oeuvre and throughout the centuries discussed. The book features previously unpublished images, many created for this publication, and it addresses a variety of specific cases while offering an original and panoramic view of the history of architecture. Beautifully written and quite accessible, 'Modern Architecture' is destined to become a classic.

  • Hermeneutics and the Rhetorical Tradition

    In this eloquent book, Kathy Eden challenges commonly accepted conceptions about the history of hermeneutics. Contending that the hermeneutical tradition is not a purely modern German specialty, she argues instead that the historical grounding of modern hermeneutics is in the ancient tradition of rhetoric. Eden demonstrates how the early rhetorical model of reading, called interpretatio scripti by Cicero and his followers, not only has informed a continuous tradition of interpretation from Republican Rome to Reformation Europe but also has forged such enduring hermeneutical principles as meaning, context, and literary economy.

  • Designing Modern America Broadway to Main Street

    The story of two legendary designers who made "modern America"

    From the 1920s through the 1950s, two individuals, Joseph Urban and Norman Bel Geddes, did more, by far, to create the image of "America" and make it synonymous with modernity than any of their contemporaries. Urban and Bel Geddes were leading Broadway stage designers and directors who turned their prodigious talents to other projects, becoming mavericks first in industrial design and then in commercial design, fashion, architecture, and more. The two men gave shape to the most quintessential symbols of the modern American lifestyle, including movies, cars, department stores, and nightclubs, along with private homes, kitchens, stoves, fridges, magazines, and numerous household furnishings.

    Illustrated with more than 130 photographs of their influential designs, this book tells the engrossing story of Urban and Bel Geddes. Christopher Innes shows how these two men with a background in theater lent dramatic flair to everything they designed and how this theatricality gave the distinctive modernity they created such wide appeal. If the American lifestyle has been much imitated across the globe over the past fifty years, says Innes, it is due in large measure to the designs of Urban and Bel Geddes. Together they were responsible for creating what has been called the "Golden Age" of American culture.

  • Making a Living in The Middle Ages

    Dramatic social and economic change during the middle ages altered the lives of the people of Britain in far-reaching ways, from the structure of their families to the ways they made their livings. In this masterly book, pre-eminent medieval historian Christopher Dyer presents a fresh view of the British economy from the ninth to the sixteenth century and a vivid new account of medieval life. He begins his volume with the formation of towns and villages in the ninth and tenth centuries and ends with the inflation, population rise, and colonial expansion of the sixteenth century. This is a book about ideas and attitudes as well as the material world, and Dyer shows how people regarded the economy and responded to economic change. He examines the growth of towns, the clearing of lands, the Great Famine, the Black Death, and the upheavals of the fifteenth century through the eyes of those who experienced them. He also explores the dilemmas and decisions of those who were making a living in a changing world - from peasants, artisans, and wage earners to barons and monks. Drawing on archaeological and landscape evidence along with more conventional archives and records, the author offers here an engaging survey of British medieval economic history unrivaled in breadth and clarity.

  • Straight Talk about Cosmetic Surgery

    A leading plastic surgeon explains the pros and cons of cosmetic surgery and skin care to help you determine what is--or isn't--right for you

    The public's recent exuberance toward cosmetic surgery has spurred an unprecedented demand for appearance-changing procedures. But how can an average consumer discern the hype from solid truth? Which of the many treatments available can fulfill the promise of a more youthful look, or more beautiful skin, or a more pleasing body shape? Which procedures don't work at all?
    In this up-to-the-minute guide, Dr. Arthur W. Perry, a practicing plastic surgeon for more than two decades, examines in close detail each of today's surgical and nonsurgical procedures. In everyday language, aided by more than a hundred illustrations, he assesses the benefits and potential complications of legitimate treatments. He also identifies and frankly discusses ineffective treatments. Dr. Perry's empowering book guides you through the seductive and somewhat slick world of cosmetic surgery. He offers criteria for selecting good doctors and facilities. In short, he has written an essential book for anyone who is contemplating cosmetic surgery or other skin-care procedures.

    Includes expert advice on:
    - Facial rejuvenation including lifts, wrinkle fillers, and peels
    - Body contouring from liposuction and tummy tucks to breast implants, reductions, and lifts
    - Botox and laser treatments
    - Avoiding fraud and procedures that don't work
    - And much more

  • The Art of Renaissance Europe - A Resource for Educators

    Designed for use in the classroom, the posters, CD-ROM slides, timeline, copies of original fifteenth- and sixteenth-century writings, and lesson plans in this boxed resource will help students explore the richness and diversity of Renaissance art.

    The tote box provides illustrations and discussions of works from the Metropolitan that embody the Renaissance interest in classical learning, fame, and beautiful objects. Texts explore the great cities and powerful personalities of the age. Students study gesture and narrative, working as Renaissance artists did when they created paintings and drawings. As they learn about perspective, the students examine the era's interest in science and mathematics. Through projects based on poetic forms of the time, they write about their responses to art. The activities and lesson plans are designed for a variety of classroom needs and can be adapted to a specific curriculum as well as used for independent study.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art's teacher-training programs and accompanying materials are made possible, in part, through a generous grant from Mr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Rose.

  • King Stephen

    This compelling new biography provides the most authoritative picture yet of King Stephen, whose reign (1135-1154), with its 'nineteen long winters' of civil war, made his name synonymous with failed leadership. After years of work on the sources, Edmund King shows with rare clarity the strengths and weaknesses of the monarch. Keeping Stephen at the forefront of his account, the author also chronicles the activities of key family members and associates whose loyal support sustained Stephens kingship. In 1135 the popular Stephen was elected king against the claims of the empress Matilda and her sons. But by 1153, Stephen had lost control over Normandy and other important regions, England had lost prestige, and the weakened king was forced to cede his familys right to succession. A rich narrative covering the drama of a tumultuous reign, this book focuses well-deserved attention on a king who lost control of his destiny.

  • Gothic Art in Ireland 1169-1550 - Enduring Vitality

    It will come as a surprise to many that a wealth of Gothic art and architecture can still be found in Ireland. This groundbreaking book examines for the first time the most westerly expression of Gothic--on the edge of Europe--and traces its development from the beginning of the thirteenth century to the Reformation. Colum Hourihane offers new insights into Gothic Irish art, and he presents a revised view of art in Ireland in the Middle Ages.

    Brought to Ireland by the Anglo-Normans and religious reform movements, the style was adopted and adapted locally, first appearing in monastic architecture and subsequently in the other arts. The book looks at what survives of Gothic art in Ireland, examines previously unknown material, and discusses such wide-ranging topics as the historiography of the style, its metalwork, iconography, and forms.

  • I Kings

    Beginning with the death of David and the rise of Solomon, 1 Kings charts the history of Israel through the divided monarchy, when Ahab reigned in the north and Jehoshaphat reigned in the south. This new translation, with introduction and commentary by biblical scholar Mordechai Cogan, is part of the Anchor Bible Commentary series, viewed by many as the definitive commentaries for use in both Christian and Jewish scholarship and worship. Cogan's translation brings new immediacy to well-known passages, such as Solomon's famously wise judgment when asked by two prostitutes to decide their dispute regarding motherhood of a child: "Cut the live son in two! And give half to one and half to the other." With a bibliography that runs to almost a thousand articles and books, Cogan's commentary demonstrates his mastery of the political history described by 1 Kings, as well as the themes of moral and religious failure that eventually led to Israel's defeat and exile.

  • The Comanche Empire

    In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, at the high tide of imperial struggles in North America, an indigenous empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. This powerful empire, built by the Comanche Indians, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, political prestige, economic power, commercial reach, and cultural influence. Yet, until now, the Comanche empire has gone unrecognized in historical accounts. This compelling and original book uncovers the lost story of the Comanches. It is a story that challenges the idea of indigenous peoples as victims of European expansion and offers a new model for the history of colonial expansion, colonial frontiers, and Indian-Euramerican relations in North America and elsewhere. Pekka Hamalainen shows in vivid detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they fell to defeat in 1875. With extensive knowledge and deep insight, the author brings into clear relief the Comanches' remarkable impact on the trajectory of history.

  • Farewell to an Idea - Episodes from a History of Modernism

    In this intense, far-reaching, and poignant book--a book that sums up the work of a lifetime--the acclaimed art historian T. J. Clark rewrites the history of modern art. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, he explains, the project called socialism may have come to an end at roughly the same moment as modernism. Did modernism and socialism depend on each other for their vitality--for their sense of the future and their wish to live in a fully material world? Have they died? Aware of modernism's foibles and blind spots, but passionately attached to the movement's wildness, Clark poses these fundamental questions in Farewell to an Idea.

    Modernism, Clark argues, was an extreme answer to an extreme condition--the one Max Weber summed up as "the disenchantment of the world." Clark focuses on instances of maximum stress, when the movement revealed its true nature. The book begins with Jacques-Louis David, painting at the height of the Terror in 1793, then leaps forward to Pissarro a hundred years later, struggling to picture Two Young Peasant Women ina way that agreed with his anarchist politics. Next the author turns in succession to Cezanne's paintings of the Grandes Baigneuses and their coincidence in time (and maybe intention) with Freud's launching of psychoanalysis; to Picasso's Cubism; and to avant-garde art after the Russian Revolution. Clark concludes with a reading of Jackson Pollock's tragic version of abstraction and suggests a new set of terms to describe avant-garde art--perhaps in its final flowering--in America after 1945. Shifting between broad, speculative history and intense analysis of specific works, Clark not only transfigures our usual understanding of modern art, he also launches a new set of proposals about modernity itself.

  • The Art of Frederick Sommer - Photography, Drawing, Collage

    "In total acceptance, almost everything becomes a revelation."--Frederick Sommer

    This stunning book--published in the artist's centenary--chronicles the extraordinary life and work of Frederick Sommer (1905-1999). One of the great masters and key innovators in the history of art photography, Sommer was a complex and highly creative individual. His work in photography is unconventional and fascinating for its wide range of methodologies and techniques. He also explored making images with other media, creating masterful drawings, collages, and musical scores.

    Arriving in Arizona in 1931, Sommer abandoned his original profession, landscape architecture, and began painting and drawing. After meeting Alfred Stieglitz in 1935 and Edward Weston in 1936, Sommer embraced and quickly mastered photography. Other artists who later proved inspirational to Sommer included Precisionist painter and photographer Charles Sheeler, Surrealist artist Max Ernst, and photographer Aaron Siskind.


    With an essay by photo historian Keith F. Davis, exquisite reproductions of Sommer's diverse works, and a detailed chronology of his life by April Watson, The Art of Frederick Sommer describesand documents the full extent of the artist's achievement as a twentieth-century visionary. The book is a revelation for scholars, artists, students, and everyone who admires and appreciates creative genius.

  • Archaeology of the Land of the Bible - 10.000 - 586 B.C.E.

    Every year thousands of enthusiasts, amateur and professional, spend the summer months digging in the sands of Israel hoping to find items that in some way relate to the places and events depicted in the Bible. This work looks at the history and archaeology of the Bible lands.

  • The Reconstruction of Nations - Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus 1569-1999

    Modern nationalism in northeastern Europe has often led to violence and then reconciliation between nations with bloody pasts. In this fascinating book, Timothy Snyder traces the emergence of Polish, Ukrainian, Lithuanian, and Belarusian nationhood over four centuries, discusses various atrocities (including the first account of the massive Ukrainian-Polish ethnic cleansings of the 1940s), and examines Poland's recent successful negotiations with its newly independent Eastern neighbors, as it has channeled national interest toward peace.

  • Hanging Fire - Contemporary Art from Pakistan

    Accompanying the first U.S. museum exhibition devoted to contemporary art from Pakistan, this dynamic catalogue provides a groundbreaking look at recent and current trends in Pakistani art. 'Hanging Fire' covers a fascinating range of subjects and media, from installation and video art to sculpture, drawing, and paintings in the 'contemporary miniature' tradition. Essays by distinguished contributors from a variety of fields, including Salima Hashmi, Pakistani-American sociologist and historian Ayesha Jalal, and the celebrated novelist Mohsin Hamid, place contemporary Pakistani art in a cultural, historical, and artistic perspective. The book's title, 'Hanging Fire', alludes to the contemporary economic, political, and social tensions - both local and global - from which these artists find their creative inspiration. It may also suggest to the viewer to delay judgment, particularly based on assumptions or preconceived notions about contemporary society and artistic expression in Pakistan today.

  • Henry I

    Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, ruled from 1100 to 1135, a time of fundamental change in the Anglo-Norman world. This long-awaited biography, written by one of the most distinguished medievalists of his generation, offers a major reassessment of Henry's character and reign. Challenging the dark and dated portrait of the king as brutal, greedy, and repressive, it argues instead that Henry's rule was based on reason and order.

    C. Warren Hollister points out that Henry laid the foundations for judicial and financial institutions usually attributed to his grandson, Henry II. Royal government was centralized and systematized, leading to firm, stable, and peaceful rule for his subjects in both England and Normandy. By mid-reign Henry I was the most powerful king in Western Europe, and with astute diplomacy, an intelligence network, and strategic marriages of his children (legitimate and illegitimate), he was able to undermine the various coalitions mounted against him. Henry strove throughout his reign to solidify the Anglo-Norman dynasty, and his marriage linked the Normans to the Old English line.

    Hollister vividly describes Henry's life and reign, places them against the political background of the time, and provides analytical studies of the king and his magnates, the royal administration, and relations between king and church. The resulting volume is one that will be welcomed by students and general readers alike.

  • Sol Lewitt - 100 Views

    Published to accompany MASS MoCA's landmark installation of Lewitt's wall drawings, this book celebrates the artist and his illustrious 50-year career.

  • The Yale Book of Quotations

    This reader-friendly volume contains more than 12,000 famous quotations, arranged alphabetically by author. It is unique in its focus on American quotations and its inclusion of items not only from literary and historical sources but also from popular culture, sports, computers, science, politics, law, and the social sciences. Anonymously authored items appear in sections devoted to folk songs, advertising slogans, television catchphrases, proverbs, and others.

    For each quotation, a source and first date of use is cited. In many cases, new research for this book has uncovered an earlier date or a different author than had previously been understood. (It was Beatrice Kaufman, not Sophie Tucker, who exclaimed, "I've been poor and I've been rich. Rich is better!" William Tecumseh Sherman wasn't the originator of "War is hell!" It was Napoleon.) Numerous entries are enhanced with annotations to clarify meaning or context for the reader. These interesting annotations, along with extensive cross-references that identify related quotations and a large keyword index, will satisfy both the reader who seeks specific information and the curious browser who appreciates an amble through entertaining pages.

  • Birds of Northern South America: An Identification Guide: Species Accounts

    Winner of the 2007 National Outdoor Book Award (NOBA) for Nature Guidebooks

    The two companion volumes of this extensive and detailed guide make a groundbreaking contribution to bird guide literature: they not only provide detailed accounts of every known bird species in the vast region from Ecuador to French Guiana but also, for the first time, illustrate virtually every plumage variation in full color. The illustrations include adult males and females where different as well as intermediate plumages, juveniles, subspecies, morphs and other variants, and several hypothetical and unconfirmed species. In all, nearly 6,400 birds are depicted. Black-and-white drawings of significant aspects of plumage or behavior are also provided, as are color maps showing river systems, political boundaries and the confirmed distribution of all the species.
    Volume 1 presents extensive species accounts, including information on habitat, vocalization, nomenclature, and the very latest taxonomy to subspecies level. An up-to-date discography lists all published CDs that contain recordings of birds of northern South America. Volume 2, designed for use in the field, contains complete range maps, Robin Restall's immaculate and jewel-like paintings, and information about specific marks, habitat, and behavior to aid in identification.

  • H. N. Werkman

    An extraordinary look at the work of a highly influential avant-garde designer, typographer, and printmaker
    Dutch designer and printmaker Hendrik Werkman (1882-1945) is best known for his innovative printing techniques and avant-garde typography. As publisher of De Blauwe Schuitt, a series of underground booklets produced by Jewish dissident poets and writers during the Nazi occupation of Holland, Werkman was imprisoned by German secret police in 1945 and executed without trial just three days before the country's liberation. This generously illustrated book is the first in English to focus on Werkman's remarkable graphic work and fascinating life.
    Werkman founded his own printmaking shop in 1908. His self-produced magazine The Next Call waspublished in 1923 and included typographical and other printmaking experiments as well as the designer's own Dadaist poems and texts. Werkman also developed a printmaking process he called "hot printing," a technique incorporating found materials that added repeated design elements directly onto the paper--all without the use of a printing press. Although much of his work was destroyed at the time of his execution, the remarkable examples that remain tell the story of a maverick designer and typographer whose graphic vision was playful, bold, experimental, and unwaveringly optimistic.

  • George I

    In 1714 George Ludwig, the fifty-eight-year-old elector of Brunswick-Luneburg, became, as George I, the first of the Hanoverian dynasty to rule Britain. Until his death in 1727 George served as both elector of Hanover and British monarch. An enigmatic figure whose real character has long been concealed by anti-Hanoverian propaganda, George emerges in this groundbreaking biography as an impressive ruler who welcomed the responsibilities the accession brought him and set out to bring culture to what he considered the unsophisticated English nation.

    Ragnhild Hatton's biography is the only comprehensive account of George's life and reign. It draws on a wide range of archival sources in several languages to illuminate the fascinating details of George's early life and dynastic crises, his plans and ambitions for the British nation, the impact of his rationalist ideas, and his accomplishments as king. The book also examines the king's private life, his family relationships in both Prussia and England, his private interest in music and the arts, and the improvement of his British and Hanoverian properties.

  • Vasemania-Form and Ornament in Neoclassical Europe - Selections from the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    When the ancient sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii were excavated in the eighteenth century, the objects found there renewed artistic interest in classicism. Neoclassical style and imagery permeated paintings, sculpture, furniture, and decorative arts of the period, and a central element of design in all these art forms was the vase.

    This beautiful book is the first to focus on the vase as an artistic and ornamental form in a variety of media. It presents and discusses about one hundred hidden treasures from The Metropolitan Museum of Art's reserve collection--not only vases but also wine and water urns, knife boxes, ink wells, perfume burners, fabrics, carved paneling, marquetry furniture, silver, works on paper, and paintings--all using the vase motif. Vase imagery ranged from austere to fantastic to romantic, say the authors of this book, and the vase became a new paradigm of artistic achievement and a central symbol of European Neoclassicism.

  • Education′s End - Why Our Colleges and Universities Have Given Up on the Meaning of Life.

    A passionate call for our colleges and universities to prepare young people for lives of fulfillment not just successful careers

    The question of what living is for--of what one should care about and why--is the most important question a person can ask. Yet under the influence of the modern research ideal, our colleges and universities have expelled this question from their classrooms, judging it unfit for organized study. In this eloquent and carefully considered book, Tony Kronman explores why this has happened and calls for the restoration of life's most important question to an honored place in higher education.The author contrasts an earlier era in American education, when the question of the meaning of life was at the center of instruction, with our own times, when this question has been largely abandoned by college and university teachers. In particular, teachers of the humanities, who once felt a special responsibility to guide their students in exploring the question of what living is for, have lost confidence in their authority to do so. And they have lost sight of the question itself in the blinding fog of political correctness that has dominated their disciplines for the past forty years. Yet Kronman sees a readiness for change--a longing among teachers as well as students to engage questions of ultimate meaning. He urges a revival of the humanities' lost tradition of studying the meaning of life through the careful but critical reading of great works of literary and philosophical imagination. And he offers here the charter document of that revival.

  • Insider Trading: How Mortuaries, Medicine and Money Have Built a Global Market in Human Cadaver Parts


    The cadaver industry in Britain and the United States, its processes and profits Except for organ transplantation little is known about the variety of stuff extracted from corpses and repurposed for medicine. A single body might be disassembled to provide hundreds of products for the millions of medical treatments performed each year. Cadaver skin can be used in wound dressings, corneas used to restore sight. Parts may even be used for aesthetic enhancement, such as liquefied skin injections to smooth wrinkles. This book is a history of the nameless corpses from which cadaver stuff is extracted and the entities involved in removing, processing, and distributing it.

    Pfeffer goes behind the mortuary door to reveal the technical, imaginative, and sometimes underhanded practices that have facilitated the global industry of transforming human fragments into branded convenience products. The dead have no need of cash, but money changes hands at every link of the supply chain.

    This book refocuses attention away from individual altruism and onto professional and corporate ethics.

  • Disraeli: The Novel Politician

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a fresh, vivid look at Disraeli's life, achievements, and temperament that casts doubts on his much-touted commitment to Jewish rights

    Lauded as a "great Jew," excoriated by antisemites, and one of Britain's most renowned prime ministers, Benjamin Disraeli has been widely celebrated for his role in Jewish history. But is the perception of him as a Jewish hero accurate? In what ways did he contribute to Jewish causes? In this groundbreaking, lucid investigation of Disraeli's life and accomplishments, David Cesarani draws a new portrait of one of Europe's leading nineteenth-century statesmen, a complicated, driven, opportunistic man.

    While acknowledging that Disraeli never denied his Jewish lineage, boasted of Jewish achievements, and argued for Jewish civil rights while serving as MP, Cesarani challenges the assumption that Disraeli truly cared about Jewish issues. Instead, his driving personal ambition required him to confront his Jewishness at the same time as he acted opportunistically. By creating a myth of aristocratic Jewish origins for himself, and by arguing that Jews were a superior race, Disraeli boosted his own career but also contributed to the consolidation of some of the most fundamental stereotypes of modern antisemitism.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent" -New York Times

    "Exemplary" -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished" -New Yorker

    "Superb" -The Guardian

  • Young Mr Turner: The First Forty Years, 1775-1815

    A definitive new biography, deftly interweaving an account of Turner's early life with profound scholarly and aesthetic appreciation of his work

    A complex figure, and divisive during his lifetime, Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) has long been considered Britain's greatest painter. An artist of phenomenal invention, complexity, and industry, Turner is now one of the world's most popular painters. This comprehensive new account of his early life draws together recent scholarship, corrects errors in the existing literature, and presents a wealth of new findings. In doing so, it furnishes a more detailed understanding than ever before of the connections between Turner's life and art.

    Taking a strictly chronological approach, Eric Shanes addresses Turner's intellectual complexity and depth, his technical virtuosity, his personal contradictions, and his intricate social and cultural relations. Shanes draws on decades of familiarity with his subject, as well as newly discovered source material, such as the artist's principal bank records, which shed significant light on his patronage and sales. The result, written in a warm, engaging style, is a comprehensive and magnificently illustrated volume which will fundamentally shape the future of Turner studies.

  • Ghetto Diary

    Janusz Korczak (1879-1942) is one of the legendary figures to emerge from the Holocaust. A successful pediatrician and well-known author in his native Warsaw, he gave up a brilliant medical career to devote himself to the care of orphans. Like so many other Jews, Korczak was sent into the Warsaw Ghetto after the Nazi occupation of Poland. He immediately set up an orphanage for more than two hundred children. Many of his admirers, Jewish and gentile, offered to rescue him from the ghetto, but Korczak refused to leave his small charges. When the Nazis ordered the children to board a train that was to carry them to the Treblinka death camp, Korczak went with them, despite the Nazis' offer of special treatment. His selfless behavior in caring for these children's lives and deaths has made him beloved throughout the world; he has been honored by UNESCO and commemorated on postage stamps in both Poland and Israel.

    Korczak's grimly inspiring ghetto diary is now available in paperback for the first time, accompanied by a new introduction by Betty Jean Lifton, the author of the biography of Korczak.

  • Georgia O'Keeffe: Abstraction

    Although Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) has long been regarded as a central figure in 20th-century art, the abstract works she created throughout her career have remained critically and popularly overlooked in favour of her representational subjects. Beginning with charcoal drawings made in 1915, which were among the most radical creations produced in the United States at that time, O'Keeffe sought to transcribe pure emotion in her work. While her output of abstract work declined after 1930, she returned to abstraction in the 1950s with a new vocabulary that provided a precedent for a younger generation of abstractionists. By devoting itself to this largely unexplored area of her work, 'Georgia O'Keeffe: Abstraction' is an overdue acknowledgment of her place as one of America's first abstractionists. In addition to rethinking O'Keeffe's role in the development of a uniquely American abstract style, this book chronicles the shifts and changes in subject matter and style over the span of her long career. It adds significant new insight into her life, reproducing excerpts of previously sealed letters written by O'Keeffe to photographer and gallerist Alfred Stieglitz, whom she married in 1924. These previously unpublished letters, along with other primary documents referenced by the authors, offer an intimate glimpse into her creative method and intentions as an artist.

  • Josep Lluis Sert - The Architect of Urban Design 1953-1969

    This book examines the emergence and evolution of the discipline of urban design as articulated through the work of Josep Lluis Sert (19021983), one of its most influential practitioners. Sert came to international attention in the 1930s and 40s as a leading young European architect active in the new discourse of modern architecture. Noted for his city planning and urban development projects in Europe, South America, and the United States, the master plans of his later career were significant for their integration of natural landscape features into the urban building scheme. Sert's academic career included an extraordinarily productive tenure as Dean of Harvard University's Graduate School of Design (19531969), where he founded and directed the Department of Urban Design. With essays by leading scholars and a wide selection of archival materials, illustrations, plans, and maps, this book provides a timely look at the man who advocated the idea of 'urban consciousness' and an architecture that dealt with the total environment, well before these concepts became commonplace.

  • Pompeo Batoni - A Complete Catalogue of His Paintings 2 Volume Box Set

    This meticulously researched catalogue presents an authoritative assessment of the works of Pompeo Batoni (1708-1787), one of the 18th century's most celebrated painters. Born in Lucca, Batoni established himself in Rome and received commissions from popes, princes, and British aristocrats on the Grand Tour. Batoni was highly sought after for his theatrical yet incisive--and often flattering--portraits. Connoisseurs and cognoscenti also prized his learned and technically brilliant allegorical, religious, and mythological compositions.

    With entries on more than 480 paintings and 250 drawings, this magnificent two-volume set provides the most complete examination to date of Batoni's entire oeuvre. Featuring beautiful, high-quality reproductions, the book provides thorough details on provenance and exhibition history as well as biographies of the portrait sitters. New analysis of the works, resulting from decades of research, reinterprets some of Batoni's iconography, identifies new textual and visual sources of his imagery, and reveals insights gleaned from unpublished archival materials.

  • The Vexations of Art - Velazquez and Others

    A major art historian reflects on a great tradition of European painting.

    "The Vexations of Art is an engrossing, passionate attempt to re-engage with painting as a mode of thought at a time when 'it is not clear in what form the resource of painting--for surely painting has been a singular resource of the greater European culture--will continue."--Jackie Wullschlager, Financial Times

    "[A] fascinating book that will surely generate discussion for some time to come."--Mindy Nancarrow, Renaissance Quarterly

  • Electronic Silk Road - How the Web Binds the World Together in Commerce

    From China to Facebookistan, the Internet has transformed global commerce. A cyber-law expert argues that we must free Internet trade while simultaneously protecting consumers.
    On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. Today's electronic Silk Roads ferry information across continents, enabling individuals and corporations anywhere to provide or receive services without obtaining a visa. But the legal infrastructure for such trade is yet rudimentary and uncertain. If an event in cyberspace occurs at once everywhere and nowhere, what law applies? How can consumers be protected when engaging with companies across the world? In this accessible book, cyber-law expert Anupam Chander provides the first thorough discussion of the law that relates to global Internet commerce. Addressing up-to-the-minute examples, such as Google's struggles with China, the Pirate Bay's skirmishes with Hollywood, and the outsourcing of services to India, the author insightfully analyzes the difficulties of regulating Internet trade. Chander then lays out a framework for future policies, showing how countries can dismantle barriers while still protecting consumer interests.

  • Marshes - The Disappearing Edens

    An intimate photographic portrait of the marsh as few have ever seen it--exquisitely subtle, mysterious, and teeming with rare birds and flora

    Drawn since boyhood to the beauty and allure of marshes, naturalist William Burt has prowled them by day and night, in every season, from one edge of North America to the other. For thirty years he has hauled his large-format camera with him, seeking to capture on film the elusive birds, the wildflowers and grasses, and the unique wild beauty of the marshes. In this breathtakingly lovely book, he selects ninety of his most striking photographs. He also offers his reflections on the marshes he has visited, inviting his readers to come with him and become acquainted with this hidden world, its richness, and its vulnerability. Burt explores marshes near and far, from Connecticut to Manitoba, the Gulf of Mexico, California's Central Valley, the Northern Plains, and elsewhere. His photographs explore all aspects and seasons of marsh life but focus especially on such shy inhabitants as rails, bitterns, grebes, and gallinules. While the photographs tell stories of their own, Burt's narrative invokes the marshes of the past and compares them to today's, with prose as picture-sharp as the photography. No book has ever evoked the mystery and beauty of the marshes so compellingly as this by William Burt. And no reader, having accompanied the author to this secret world, will fail to appreciate the rare privilege of having been there.

  • The Print in Early Modern England - An His Oversight

    The print repertoire of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England has been neglected historically, and this remarkable book rectifies a major oversight in the history of English visual art. The book provides an iconographic survey of the single-sheet prints produced in Britain during the early modern era and brings to light significant recent discoveries from this visual storehouse, many of them noticed only within the last decade. It publishes many works for the first time, as well as placing them and those relatively few others known to specialists in their cultural context. This large body of material is treated broadly thematically, and within each theme, chronologically. Chapters are devoted to portents and prodigies, the formal moralities and doctrines of Christianity, the sects of Christianity - and the often vicious satire of the Catholic confession (but also of Protestant non-conformists) - visual satire of foreigners and 'others', domestic political issues - principally, the English Civil War - social criticism and gender roles, marriage and sex, as well as numerical series and miscellaneous visual tricks, puzzles and jokes. The concluding chapter considers the significance of this wealth of visual material - much of it never reproduced before - for the cultural history of England in the early modern era. This pioneering, important book enlarges the iconographic repertoire of the period, leading to the conclusion that England was not as insular artistically as is often thought, and that the English had access to an astonishingly wide range of iconography. Tracing the European sources of many of these prints leads to the surprising recognition of the influence of the German print repertoire, to an extent that demands a re-appraisal of cultural relations between England and Germany during the early modern era.

  • Seeing Mexico Photographed - The Work of Horne, Casasola, Modotti and Alvarez Bravo

    This engrossing book presents the photographs of four historically engaged artists and explains what they reveal about the highly dramatic revolutionary and post-revolutionary period in Mexico from 1910 to 1935. The works of these photographersAmerican Walter H. Horne, Italian Tina Modotti, and Mexicans Agustin Victor Casasola and Manuel Alvarez Bravoare discussed not just as windows onto events but as artworks that offer both objective reporting and stylized expression.The twenty-five years covered in the book encompass some of the most convulsive developments in Mexico, from the violence and cataclysmic changes wrought by the Mexican Revolution to the immense struggles to forge a new nation and a new government. During this period, the work of the four photographerstwo primarily documentary, one propagandistic, and one artistic and personalenabled Mexicans to understand the forces that had brought their nation to armed conflict and social transformation."

  • Diary

    A single-volume edition of Diary, Gombrowicz's acclaimed masterpiece, now with previously unpublished pages restored

    Just before the outbreak of World War II, young Witold Gombrowicz left his home in Poland and set sail for South America. In 1953, still living as an expatriate in Argentina, he began his Diary with one of literature's most memorable openings:
    "Monday
    Me.
    Tuesday
    Me.
    Wednesday
    Me.
    Thursday
    Me."

    Gombrowicz's Diary grew to become a vast collection of essays, short notes, polemics, and confessions on myriad subjects ranging from political events to literature to the certainty of death. Not a traditional journal, Diary is instead the commentary of a brilliant and restless mind. Widely regarded as a masterpiece, this brilliant work compelled Gombrowicz's attention for a decade and a half until he penned his final entry in France, shortly before his death in 1969.

    Long out of print in English, Diary is now presented in a convenient single volume featuring a new preface by Rita Gombrowicz, the author's widow and literary executor. This edition also includes ten previously unpublished pages from the 1969 portion of the diary.

  • Alberto Giacometti - Myth, Magic, and the Man

    Alberto Giacometti, one of the most important artists of the twentieth century, was also one of the most enigmatic. In this major new interpretation of Giacometti and his work, art historian and psychoanalyst Laurie Wilson demonstrates how the artist's secret beliefs and emotional scars are reflected in his evocative sculpture, drawings, and paintings.

    Wilson's Giacometti was an extremely imaginative child who entwined fantasy and real-life experiences. As he matured, the artist combined fact and fancy into evolving myths, part conscious and part unconscious. Drawing on biographical data uncovered during a decade of research, Wilson reconstructs traumatic events and issues in Giacometti's life--including family births and deaths in early childhood, world wars and their aftermath, and his intense and ambivalent relationship with his parents--and examines their profound effects on his artistic evolution. These startling new interpretations will forever change the way we understand both the man and his work.

  • The Art of Medicine in Ancient Egypt

    The prevention and cure of disease and the treatment of injuries were major concerns in ancient Egypt. Poorly understood in Egyptian society, illness informed much of their art. Featuring works from The Metropolitan Museum's collection, this fascinating book examines this relatively unexplored and underappreciated aspect of Egyptian art. It includes two introductory essays on Egyptian medicine, descriptions and photographs of sixty-four objects, and the first color reproduction of the Edwin Smith Papyrus in its entirety, accompanied by a full translation. One of the world's oldest scientific documents, the fifteen-foot-long Smith papyrus (now housed in the New York Academy of Medicine), discusses both practical and magical treatments of wounds and other maladies.

  • Women Writers of Early Modern Spain - Sophia′s Daughters

    This fascinating collection is the first to gather together a wide variety of works by Spanish women writers of the Golden Age. In the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries, the cloister was a refuge for women with intellectual aspirations. A small percentage of women in religious orders put their writing skills to literary use, producing biographies of founding sisters, histories of their orders, and even poetry and theater. Most of these writings were never published, and only now are researchers beginning to unearth and transcribe them.

    Women Writers of Early Modern Spain features:

    • Spanish texts by Oliva Sabuco de Nantes, Maria de Zayas, Ana Caro, Leonor de la Cueva, and many others;
    • An introduction in Spanish to each reading, with biographical information, comments on the author's approach, an overview of pertinent criticism, and an analysis of the work;
    • A generous English introduction to the volume, placing writing by early modern Spanish women within the broader context of European life and culture;
    • Full footnotes and topics for discussion for each unit;
    • A selected bibliography for readers who wish to pursue independent study.

    .

  • Apostles of Beauty - Arts and Crafts from Britian to Chicago

    The Arts and Crafts movement in architecture, interior design, and decorative arts reached its peak between 1880 and 1910 in Britain and North America. The movement's emphasis on aesthetic quality and a high level of craftsmanship, promoted as an antidote to the ubiquity and uninspired appearance of machine-produced products, remains much admired today. Arts and Crafts enjoyed special resonance in Chicago, the home of Jane Addams' Hull House, where immigrants and women received training in handicraft skills not only to beautify domestic life but also to provide them with viable, honourable work. 'Apostles of Beauty' presents outstanding examples by the movement's British originators, such as William Morris and Charles Robert Ashbee, as well as its greatest American practitioners, such as Gustav Stickley and Frank Lloyd Wright. The volume highlights a wide range of objects, including ceramics, furniture, metalwork, paintings, photographs, and textiles. It focuses on Chicago's absorption and interpretation of the movement, featuring works from the Art Institute, the University of Chicago, the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Crab Tree Farm, and private collections. Contributors to the book explore the complex influences of the Arts and Crafts style and provide a thematic history of the movement, including a section on design and collecting in Chicago.

  • Education's End: Why Our Colleges and Universities Have Given Up on the Meaning of Life

    The question of what living is for--of what one should care about and why--is the most important question a person can ask. Yet under the influence of the modern research ideal, our colleges and universities have expelled this question from their classrooms, judging it unfit for organized study. In this eloquent and carefully considered book, Tony Kronman explores why this has happened and calls for the restoration of life's most important question to an honored place in higher education.
    The author contrasts an earlier era in American education, when the question of the meaning of life was at the center of instruction, with our own times, when this question has been largely abandoned by college and university teachers. In particular, teachers of the humanities, who once felt a special responsibility to guide their students in exploring the question of what living is for, have lost confidence in their authority to do so. And they have lost sight of the question itself in the blinding fog of political correctness that has dominated their disciplines for the past forty years.
    Yet Kronman sees a readiness for change--a longing among teachers as well as students to engage questions of ultimate meaning. He urges a revival of the humanities' lost tradition of studying the meaning of life through the careful but critical reading of great works of literary and philosophical imagination. And he offers here the charter document of that revival.

  • Becoming Edvard Munch - Influence,Aniety and Myth

    Two potent myths have traditionally defined our understanding of the artist Edvard Munch (1862-1944): he was mentally unstable, as his iconic work 'The Scream' (1893) suggests, and he was radically independent, following his own singular vision. 'Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth' persuasively challenges these entrenched perceptions. In this book, Jay A. Clarke demonstrates that Munch was thoroughly in control of his artistic identity, a savvy businessman skilled in responding to the market and shaping popular opinion. Moreover, the author shows that Munch was keenly aware of the art world of his day, adopting motifs, styles and techniques from a wide variety of sources, including many Scandinavian artists. By presenting Munch's paintings, prints and drawings in relation to those of European contemporaries, including Harriet Backer, James Ensor, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, Christian Krohg and Claude Monet, Clarke reveals often surprising connections and influences. This interpretive approach, grounded in Munch's diaries and letters, period criticism and the artworks themselves, reintroduces Munch as an artist who cultivated myths both visual and personal. 'Becoming Edvard Munch' features beautiful colour reproductions of approximately 150 works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and his peers.

  • Bill Evans - How My Heart Sings

    This enthralling book is the first biography in English of Bill Evans, one of the most influential of all jazz pianists. Peter Pettinger, himself a concert pianist, describes Evans's life (the personal tragedies and commercial successes), his musicmaking (technique, compositional methods, and approach to group playing), and his legacy. The book also includes a full discography and dozens of photographs.

  • Agnes Martin

    Gorgeously quiet in colour and composition, Agnes Martin's paintings have a distinctive grace that sets them apart from those of the Abstract Expressionists of her day and the Minimalist artists she inspired. Martin attributed her grid-based works to metaphysical motivations, lending a serene complexity to her oeuvre that has defied any easy categorization. Perhaps for this reason, critical and scholarly analysis of her paintings has been scarce, until now. This important new anthology brings together the most current scholarship on Martin's paintings by twelve multidisciplinary essayists who consider various aspects of the artist's four-decade career. Organized by Dia Art Foundation, whose extensive holdings of Martin's paintings and ambitions to support in-depth research on the works are unparalleled, the publication brings renewed focus and energy to Martin's career and her contributions to the art historical narrative.

  • Mexico and Modern Printmaking - A Revolution in the Graphic Arts 1920-50

    Mexico witnessed an exciting revival of printmaking alongside its better-known public mural program in the decades after the 1910-20 revolution. Major artists such as Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and Rufino Tamayo produced numbers of prints that furthered the social and political reforms of the revolution and helped develop a uniquely Mexican cultural identity. This groundbreaking book is the first to undertake an in-depth examination of these prints, the vital contributions Mexico's printmakers made to modern art, and their influence on coming generations of foreign artists.
    Along with a thorough discussion of the printmaking practices of Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros, Tamayo, and others, the book features some 300 handsomely illustrated prints--many previously unpublished. Essays by distinguished scholars investigate the dynamic cultural exchange between Mexico and other countries at this time. They analyze the work of such Mexican artists as Emilio Amero and Jesus Escobedo, who traveled abroad, and such international artists as Elizabeth Catlett and Jean Charlot, who came to Mexico. They also discuss the important roles of the Taller de Grafica Popular, a flourishing print workshop founded in Mexico City in 1937, and the Weyhe Gallery in New York, which published and distributed prints by many of these artists during the 1920s and 1930s. Together, the prints and essays tell the fascinating history of Mexico's graphic-arts movement in the first half of the 20th century.

  • The Cosmopolitan Interior - Liberalism and the Victorian Home, 1870-1914

    Literature on domestic interior decoration first emerged as a popular genre in Britain during the 1870s and 1880s, as middle-class readers sought decorating advice from books, household manuals, women's magazines, and professional journals. This intriguing book examines that literature and shows how it was influenced by the widespread liberalism of the middle class.

    Judith Neiswander explains that during these years liberal values--individuality, cosmopolitanism, scientific rationalism, the progressive role of the elite, and the emancipation of women--informed advice about the desirable appearance of the home. In the period preceding the First World War, these values changed dramatically: advice on decoration became more nationalistic in tone and a new goal was set for the interior--"to raise the British child by the British hearth." Neiswander traces this evolving discourse within the context of current writing on interior decoration, writing that is much more detached from social and political issues of the day.

  • The Man Who Was Rip Van Winkle - Joseph Jefferson and Nineteenth-Century American Theatre

    The most beloved American comedic actor of the nineteenth century, Joseph Jefferson made his name as Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle. In this book, a compelling blend of biography and theatrical and cultural history, Benjamin McArthur chronicles Jefferson's remarkable career and offers a lively and original account of the heroic age of the American theatre.

    Joe Jefferson's entire life was spent on the stage, from the age of Jackson to the dawn of motion pictures. He extensively toured the United States as well as Australia and Great Britain. An ever-successful career (including acclaim as painter and memoirist) put him in the company of the great actors, artists, and writers of the day, including Edwin Forrest, Edwin Booth, John Singer Sargent, and William Dean Howells. This book rescues a brilliant figure and places him, appropriately enough, on center stage of a pivotal time for American theatre. McArthur explores the personalities of the period, the changing theatrical styles and their audiences, the touring life, and the wide and varied culture of theatre. Through the life of Jefferson, McArthur is able to illuminate an era.

  • The Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson - Johnson on the English Language V18

    This volume collects the most important statements on the English language by Samuel Johnson, one of its greatest expositors and speakers. The book includes scholarly, fully annotated editions of Johnson's main writings on the history, structure, and cultural importance of the English language as well as his reflections on lexicography. These texts represent Johnson's thinking as he undertook and completed the major work of his life, the colossal Dictionary of the English Language.
    The editors set Johnson's writings on the English language in historical context and provide the fullest possible account of their composition. Among the works presented in the volume are Johnson's Plan of a Dictionary of the English Language and the Preface to the Dictionary, both of which are counted among his finest works of prose.

  • On Eloquence

    'On Eloquence' questions the common assumption that eloquence is merely a sub-set of rhetoric, a means toward a rhetorical end. Denis Donoghue, an eminent and prolific critic of the English language, holds that this assumption is erroneous. While rhetoric is the use of language to persuade people to do one thing rather than another, Donoghue maintains that eloquence is 'gratuitous, ideally autonomous, in speech and writing - an upsurge of creative vitality for its own sake'. He offers many instances of eloquence in words, and suggests the forms our appreciation of them should take. Donoghue argues persuasively that eloquence matters, that we should indeed care about it. 'Because we should care about any instances of freedom, independence, creative force, sprezzatura', he says, 'especially when we live - perhaps this is increasingly the case - in a culture of the same, featuring official attitudes, stereotypes of the officially enforced values, sedated language, a politics of pacification'. A noteworthy addition to Donoghue's long-term project to reclaim a disinterested appreciation of literature as literature, this volume is a wise and pleasurable meditation on eloquence, its unique ability to move or give pleasure, and its intrinsic value.

  • The Oboe

    The oboe, including its earlier forms the shawm and the hautboy, is an instrument with a long and rich history. In this book two distinguished oboist-musicologists trace that history from its beginnings to the present time, discussing how and why the oboe evolved, what music was written for it, and which players were prominent.

    Geoffrey Burgess and Bruce Haynes begin by describing the oboe's prehistory and subsequent development out of the shawm in the mid-seventeenth century. They then examine later stages of the instrument, from the classical hautboy to the transition to a keyed oboe and eventually the Conservatoire-system oboe. The authors consider the instrument's place in Romantic and Modernist music and analyze traditional and avant-garde developments after World War II. Noting the oboe's appearance in paintings and other iconography, as well as in distinctive musical contexts, they examine what this reveals about the instrument's social function in different eras. Throughout the book they discuss the great performers, from the pioneers of the seventeenth century to the traveling virtuosi of the eighteenth, the masters of the romantic period and the legends of the twentieth century such as Gillet, Goossens, Tabuteau, and Holliger. With its extensive illustrations, useful technical appendices, and discography, this is a comprehensive and authoritative volume that will be the essential companion for every woodwind student and performer.

  • The Culture of Nature in Britain 1680-1860

    This wide-ranging book investigates the emergence of modern ideas about the natural world in Britain from 1680-1860 through an examination of the cultural values common to the sciences, art, literature, and natural theology. During this critical period, spanned by Newtonian science and natural theology, Darwin's 'Origin of Species', and Ruskin's 'Modern Painters', the fundamental conception of nature and humanity's place within it changed. P. M. Harman calls for a new understanding of the varied ways in which the British comprehended natural beauty, from the perception of nature as a 'design' flowing from God's creative power to the Darwinian naturalistic aesthetic. Harman connects a variety of differing views of nature deriving from religion, science, visual art, philosophy, and literature to developments in agriculture, manufacture, and the daily lives of individuals. This ambitious and accessible book represents intellectual history at its best.

  • Ecological Niches - Linking Classic and Contemporary Approaches

    The tradition of portraiture in Latin America is astonishingly long and rich. For over 2,000 years, portraits have been used to preserve the memory of the deceased, bolster the social standing of the aristocracy, mark the deeds of the mighty, advance the careers of politicians, record rites of passage, and mock symbols of the status quo. This beautiful and wide-ranging book--the first to explore the tradition of portraiture in Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present day--features some 200 works from fifteen countries.

    Retratos (Portraits) presents an engaging variety of works by such well-known figures as Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Fernando Botero, and Jose Campeche as well as stunning examples by anonymous and obscure artists. Distinguished contributors discuss the significance of portraits in ancient Mayan civilizations, in the world of colonial Iberians, in the political struggles of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and in a remarkable range of other times and locations.

    With a wealth of informative details and exquisite color illustrations, Retratos invites readers to appreciate Latin American portraits and their many meanings as never before.

  • Stalin - New Biography of a Dictator

    Josef Stalin exercised supreme power in the Soviet Union from 1929 until his death in 1953. During that quarter-century, by Oleg Khlevniuk s estimate, he caused the imprisonment and execution of no fewer than a million Soviet citizens "per year." Millions more were victims of famine directly resulting from Stalin's policies. What drove him toward such ruthlessness? This essential biography, by the author most deeply familiar with the vast archives of the Soviet era, offers an unprecedented, fine-grained portrait of Stalin the man and dictator. Without mythologizing Stalin as either benevolent or an evil genius, Khlevniuk resolves numerous controversies about specific events in the dictator s life while assembling many hundreds of previously unknown letters, memos, reports, and diaries into a comprehensive, compelling narrative of a life that altered the course of world history.
    In brief, revealing prologues to each chapter, Khlevniuk takes his reader into Stalin s favorite dacha, where the innermost circle of Soviet leadership gathered as their "vozhd" lay dying. Chronological chapters then illuminate major themes: Stalin s childhood, his involvement in the Revolution and the early Bolshevik government under Lenin, his assumption of undivided power and mandate for industrialization and collectivization, the Terror, World War II, and the postwar period. At the book s conclusion, the author presents a cogent warning against nostalgia for the Stalinist era."

  • Clerkenwell V46 and V47 Set

    Clerkenwell is one of the most varied, intricate and richly historic districts of Englands capital city. Its choice for study by the Survey of London is a mark both of its age-old fascination and of its contemporary appeal. Today Southern Clerkenwell, just north of the City, has become a fashionable location. It houses many in the creative industries, its restaurants and bars are thronged, and its population has been rising for two decades. Northern Clerkenwell, by contrast, has long been acknowledged as having some of Londons best Georgian housing and urban landscapes. There is also an intriguingly mixed quarter beyond the Angel and Pentonville Road, reaching north into Islington. The two parts of Clerkenwell are covered separately in these two interlinked volumes, which are available either separately or as a pair. Clerkenwells present prosperity is rooted in its past. Its density of development, its patterns of land-use and its street layout are witnesses to an unbroken history, going back to monastic foundations. Within the compass of the present volumes, the Survey of London brings together the riches of the area, aiming to omit nothing of significance old or new. In so doing it has created a practical record in words and images of enduring value and usefulness for planners, residents, historians and the wider public. These volumes are the latest in the parish series published at regular intervals over the past hundred years by the Survey of London. They mark several new departures for the Survey. They are the first to be published by Yale University Press, under the sponsorship of the Paul Mellon Centre, and the first to have photographs integrated with the text alongside the handsome architectural drawings for which the series is famed. They also make widespread use of colour images for the first time. Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

  • Savonarola - The Rise and Fall of a Renaissance Prophet

    A deeply considered new biography of the visionary Dominican by a leading Renaissance scholar

    Girolamo Savonarola, the fifteenth-century doom-saying friar, embraced the revolution of the Florentine republic and prophesied that it would become the center of a New Age of Christian renewal and world domination. This new biography, the culmination of many decades of study, presents an original interpretation of Savonarola's prophetic career and a highly nuanced assessment of his vision and motivations.

    Weinstein sorts out the multiple strands that connect Savonarola to his time and place, following him from his youthful rejection of a world he regarded as corrupt, to his engagement with that world to save it from itself, to his shattering confession--an admission that he had invented his prophesies and faked his visions. Was his confession sincere? A forgery circulated by his inquisitors? Or an attempt to escape bone-breaking torture? Weinstein offers a highly innovative analysis of the testimony to provide the first truly satisfying account of Savonarola and his fate as a failed prophet.

  • Yorkshire - York & the East Riding

    This volume sheds light on the pride of the region - the great medieval churches of York Minster, the Minster and St Mary at Beverley, and Holy Trinity, Hull but also on less well known architectural pleasures of town and county. Outstanding Victorian village churches, including masterpieces by Street & Pearson, are as rewarding as the major country houses of Burton Agnes, Burton Constable and Sledmere. The countryside offes a wide range of monuments, from the beautifully sited ruins of Kirkham Priory to the spectacular Humber Bridge. Farmhouses and cottages of the Wolds, picturesque estate villages and chapels, and industrial structures are all brought into focus. A large section is devoted to York and includes a survey of the historic buildings of the city centre from the Roman period onwards. This is complemented by a detailed exploration of York's eighteenth and nineteenth-century suburbs. Equal care has been applied to the descriptions of Beverley, with its attractive townscape, and the port of Hull, where unexpected highlights include seventeenth-century merchant houses, Georgian almshouses, ornate Victorian pubs, and grand Edwardian public buildings.

  • Howard Hodgkin 1992-2007

    Howard Hodgkin (b. 1932) is among the most important artists working in Britain today. Nominally abstract, his paintings are, in his words, "representational pictures of emotional situations." Sumptuously illustrated, this book presents a selection of Hodgkin's paintings from the last fifteen years and provides a critical coda to the most recent retrospective publications on this artist's work. Essays by Richard Morphet and Anthony Lane bring together personal responses to Hodgkin's work of the last fifteen years (with special reference to works in the exhibition at Yale and Cambridge); accounts of the development of his art in the preceding decades; observations on the artist's relationship between his personal circumstances and his art; and discussion of some of the links between Hodgkin's vision and the work of selected other artists in England, continental Europe, and the United States.

  • Mrs. Delany and Her Circle

    At the age of seventy-two, Mary Delany, nee Mary Granville (1700-1788), embarked upon a series of nearly a thousand botanical collages, or 'paper mosaics', which would prove to be the crowning achievement of her rich creative life. These delicate hand-cut floral designs, made by a method of Mrs. Delany's own invention, vie with the finest botanical works of her time. More than two centuries later her extraordinary work continues to inspire. Although best known for these collages, Mrs. Delany was also an amateur artist, woman of fashion, and commentator on life and society in eighteenth-century England and Ireland. Her prolific craft activities not only served to cement personal bonds of friendship, but also allowed her to negotiate the interconnecting artistic, aristocratic, and scientific networks that surrounded her. This ambitious and groundbreaking book, the first to survey the full range of Mrs. Delany's creative endeavours, reveals the complexity of her engagement with natural science, fashion and design. It is published in association with the Yale Center for British Art.

  • The Banana Tree at the Gate - A History of Marginal Peoples and Global Markets in Borneo

    The Hikayat Banjar, a seventeenth-century native court chronicle from Southeast Borneo, characterizes the irresistibility of natural resource wealth to outsiders as 'the banana tree at the gate'. Michael Dove employs this phrase as a root metaphor to frame the history of resource relations between the indigenous peoples of Borneo and the world system. In analyzing production and trade in forest products, pepper, and especially natural rubber, Dove shows that the involvement of Borneos native peoples in commodity production for global markets is ancient and highly successful. Dove demonstrates that processes of globalization began millennia ago and that they have been more diverse and less teleological than often thought. Doves analysis replaces the image of the isolated tropical forest community that needs to be helped into the global system with the reality of communities that have been so successful and competitive that they have had to fight political elites to keep from being forced out.

  • The Inventor`s Dilemma - The Remarkable Life of H. Joseph Gerber

    The extraordinary life and career of the iconic twentieth-century inventor, technologist, and business magnate H. Joseph Gerber is described in a fascinating biography written by his son, David, based on unique access to unpublished sources. A Holocaust survivor whose early experiences shaped his ethos of invention, Gerber pioneered important developments in engineering, electronics, printing, apparel, aerospace, and numerous other areas, playing an essential role in the transformation of American industry. Gerber's story is remarkable and inspiring, and his method, redolent of Edison's and Sperry's, holds a key to a restored national economy and American creative vitality in the twenty-first century.

  • Highlands & Islands

    This volume covers the vast area of the Highland region, the Western Isles, Orkney and Shetland and highlights buildings and monuments as varied as its landscapes: brochs, cairns and ceremonial settings of standing stones; cathedrals and abbeys, both medieval and Victorian; churches of every period and denomination, their interiors and graveyards often housing unexpected delights. Castles and tower-houses and a string of Hanoverian forts contrast with prehistoric farmsteads and Georgian and Victorian farmhouses. Country houses range from the display of ducal splendour at Dunrobin, through the Georgian elegance of Cromarty and Culloden and a mass of Victorian baronial, to expressions of the high ideals and simple life of the Arts-&-Crafts movement.

  • Every Farm a Factory - The Industrial Ideal in American Agriculture

    Winner of the 2003 Saloutos Award for the best book on American agricultural history given by the Agricultural History Society
    During the early decades of the twentieth century, agricultural practice in America was transformed from a pre-industrial to an industrial activity. In this book Deborah Fitzgerald argues that farms became modernized in the 1920s because they adopted not only new machinery but also the financial, cultural, and ideological apparatus of industrialism. Fitzgerald examines how bankers and emerging professionals in engineering and economics pushed for systematic, businesslike farming. She discusses how factory practices served as a template for the creation across the country of industrial or corporate farms. She looks at how farming was affected by this revolution and concludes by following several agricultural enthusiasts to the Soviet Union, where the lessons of industrial farming were studied.

  • Brahms - The Four Symphonies

    This book is the definitive guide to Johannes Brahms's four symphonies. It presents an engaging and thorough treatment of the genesis, structure, reception, and performance history of these internationally admired and frequently performed works. Walter Frisch provides a sensitive analytical commentary on the symphonies as well as a consideration of their place within Brahms's oeuvre, within the symphonic repertory of his day, and within the broader musical culture of nineteenth-century Germany and Austria. Frisch also pays particular attention to the evolution of performance style since Brahms's symphonies were first heard.
    The book begins with an investigation of the different ideologies of the symphony in the decades leading up to Brahms's First. Brahms's early development as a composer is also examined. Frisch then devotes a detailed chapter to each of the four symphonies, including an in-depth analysis of each movement. A separate chapter treats the reception of Brahms's symphonies, and the book concludes with a history of the performances of the symphonies in the concert hall and in early recordings.

  • Gospel According to John I-XII

    In the first volume of Raymond E. Brown's magisterial three-volume commentary on the Gospel According to John, all of the major Johannine questions--of authorship, composition, dating, the relationship of John to the Synoptics (Mark, Matthew, and Luke)--are discussed. The important theories of modern biblical scholarship concerning John are weighed against the evidence given in the text and against prevailing biblical research. In sum, what is attempted is a synthesis of the major scholarly insights that bear on the Fourth Gospel.

    The translation--as Father Brown states at the outset--strives not for any formal beauty but rather for an accurate and contemporary version: "the simple, everyday Greek of the Gospel has been rendered into the ordinary American English of today." The result is a translation that will strike the reader with uncommon immediacy.

    Father Brown also analyzes, in the appendixes, the meaning, use, and frequency of certain key words and phrases that occur in John, and examines the differences between the Johannine and Synoptic treatments of the miracle stories.
    The chapters of the Gospel translated here in Volume 29 (1-12) comprise the Prologue, which opens with the famous "In the beginning was the Word," and the Book of Signs, an account of the miracles of Jesus and of his ministry.

  • All Can Be Saved - Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World

    It would seem unlikely that one could discover tolerant religious attitudes in Spain, Portugal and the New World colonies during the era of the Inquisition, when enforcement of Catholic orthodoxy was widespread and brutal. Yet this groundbreaking book does exactly that. Drawing on an enormous body of historical evidence, including records of the Inquisition itself, the historian Stuart Schwartz investigates the idea of religious tolerance and its evolution in the Hispanic world from 1500 to 1820. Focusing on the attitudes and beliefs of common people rather than those of intellectual elites, the author finds that no small segment of the population believed in freedom of conscience and rejected the exclusive validity of the Church. The book explores various sources of tolerant attitudes, the challenges that the New World presented to religious orthodoxy, the complex relations between 'popular' and 'learned' culture, and many related topics. The volume concludes with a discussion of the relativist ideas that were taking hold elsewhere in Europe during this era.

  • Children′s Peer Relations and Social Competence - A Century of Progress

    This book examines the role of peer relationships in child and adolescent development by tracking research findings from the early 1900s to the present. Dividing the research into three generations, the book describes what has been learned about children's peer relations and how children's participation in peer relationships contributes to their health, adjustment, and achievement.

    Gary W. Ladd reviews and interprets the investigative focus and findings of distinct research eras to highlight theoretical or empirical breakthroughs in the study of children's peer relations and social competence over the last century. He also discusses how this information is relevant to understanding and promoting children's health and development. In a final chapter, the author appraises the major discoveries that have emerged during the three research generations and analyzes recent scientific agendas and discoveries in the peer relations discipline.

  • Science And the Trinity: The Christian Encounter With Reality

    One of our great theologians, also a physicist, here sets a new agenda for religion's dialogue with science

    Most often, the dialogue between religion and science is initiated by the discoveries of modern science--big bang cosmology, evolution, or quantum theory, for example. In this book, scientist-theologian John Polkinghorne changes the discussion. He approaches the dialogue from a little-explored perspective in which theology shapes the argument and sets the agenda of questions to be considered.

    The author begins with a review of approaches to science and religion in which the classification focuses on theological content rather than on methodological technique. He then proceeds with chapters discussing the role of Scripture, a theology of nature, the doctrine of God, sacramental theology, and eschatology. Throughout, Polkinghorne takes the perspective of Trinitarian thinking while arguing in a style that reflects the influence of his career as a theoretical physicist. In the final chapter, the author defends the appropriateness of addressing issues of science and religion from the specific standpoint of his Christian belief. His book provides an important model for theologians and scientists alike, showing how their two fields can inform one another in significant ways.

  • Joseph Cornell: Navigating the Imagination

    Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) was a self-taught yet highly sophisticated artist who is celebrated for his pioneering achievement in the art of assemblage, often in the form of box constructions. Cornell's lyrical compositions combine found materials in ways that reflect a highly personal exploration of art and culture and that represent his belief in art as an uplifting voyage into the imagination. This stunning book is published to accompany the first retrospective of the artist's work in over twenty-five years. In this volume, Cornell scholar Lynda Roscoe Hartigan addresses his evolution and positioning as an American artist who developed a singular style of seeing. His transformation of found materials, distillation of far-flung ideas and traditions, and mingling of the vernacular and the erudite all resonate with the spirit of synthetic innovation associated with American art and culture. There are seven thematic sections: Cabinets of Curiosity, Dream Machines, Bouquets of Homage, Nature's Theatre, Geographies of the Heavens, Crystal Cages, and Chambers of Time; these sections explore the major recurring ideas that have shaped his work. The book will also include an introduction, a bibliography, numerous illustrations of the artist's source material, and much more.

  • Chaotic Harmony - Contemporary Korean Photography

    Recently contemporary Korean art has garnered significant international recognition, in part for the work of photographers Atta Kim and Bae Bien-U. Now, this richly illustrated book brings their work together with that of forty other up-and-coming Korean artists, each working to stretch the bounds of the photographic medium. One of the first books on the subject, Chaotic Harmony features essays by Anne Wilkes Tucker and Karen Sinsheimer exploring the notions of urbanization, politics, identity, community, globalization, tradition, and fantasy in today's Korean photography. A chronology of recent developments, prepared by noted photographer Bohnchang Koo, also accompanies brief biographies of the artists, as well as a complete checklist of the exhibition. This catalogue sheds a new light on Korean photographers' little-known contributions to the world arena of contemporary art.

  • Russian Architecture and the West

    An unprecedented account of the history of Russian architecture and its previously unrecognized links to the Western tradition

    This is the first book to show the development of Russian architecture over the past thousand years as a part of the history of Western architecture. Dmitry Shvidkovsky, Russia's leading architectural historian, departs from the accepted notion that Russian architecture developed independent of outside cultural influences and demonstrates that, to the contrary, the influence of the West extends back to the tenth century and continues into the present. He offers compelling assessments of all the main masterpieces of Russian architecture and frames a radically new architectural history for Russia. The book systematically analyzes Russian buildings in relation to developments in European art, pointing out where familiar European features are expressed in Russian projects. Special attention is directed toward decorations based on Byzantine models; the heritage of Italian master builders and carvers; the impact of architects and others sent by Elizabeth I; the formation of the Russian Imperial Baroque; the Enlightenment in Russian art; and 19th- and 20th-century European influences. With over 300 specially commissioned photographs of sites throughout Russia and western Europe, this magnificent book is both beautiful and groundbreaking.

  • The Colorado Doctrine - Water Rights, Corporations and Distributive Justice on the American Frontier

    Making extensive use of archival and other primary sources, David Schorr demonstrates that the development of the "appropriation doctrine," a system of private rights in water, was part of a radical attack on monopoly and corporate power in the arid West. Schorr describes how Colorado miners, irrigators, lawmakers, and judges forged a system of private property in water based on a desire to spread property and its benefits as widely as possible among independent citizens. He demonstrates that ownership was not dictated by concerns for economic efficiency, but by a regard for social justice.

  • Dundee and Angus - Buildings of Scotland Series

    This volume in the Buildings of Scotland series explores the rich architectural diversity of Dundee and Angus. Dundee, the fourth-largest city in Scotland, boasts some of the country's finest ecclesiastical, public, industrial, and commercial buildings, including the unique Maggie's Centre designed by Frank Gehry. Beyond Dundee lies the predominantly rural county of Angus, where visitors can see stunning Pictish and early Christian monuments, castles, country houses, and the famed Bell Rock Lighthouse, the world's oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse.

  • The Sight of Death - An Experiment in Art Writing

    Why do we find ourselves returning to certain pictures time and again? What is it we are looking for? How does our understanding of an image change over time? In his latest book T. J. Clark addresses these questions - and many more - in ways that steer art writing into new territory. In early 2000 two extraordinary paintings by Poussin hung in the Getty Museum in a single room, Landscape with a Man Killed by a Snake (National Gallery, London) and the Getty's own Landscape with a Calm. Clark found himself returning to the gallery to look at these paintings morning after morning, and almost involuntarily he began to record his shifting responses in a notebook. The result is a riveting analysis of the two landscapes and their different views of life and death, but more, a chronicle of an investigation into the very nature of visual complexity, the capacity of certain images to sustain repeated attention, and how pictures repond to, but also resist, their viewers' deepest wishes. Clarks meditations - sometimes directly personal, sometimes speaking to the wider politics of our present image-world - track the experience of viewing art through all its real-life twists and turns.

  • The Magnificent Mrs. Tennant: The Adventurous Life of Gertrude Tennant, Victorian Grande Dame

    Gertrude Tennant's life was remarkable for its length (1819-1918), but even more so for the influence she achieved as an unsurpassed London hostess. The salon she established when widowed in her early fifties attracted legions of celebrities, among them Gladstone and Disraeli, Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, Thomas Huxley, John Everett Millais, Henry James, and Robert Browning. In her youth she had a fling with Gustave Flaubert, and in her later years she became the redoubtable mother-in-law to the explorer Henry Morton Stanley. But as a woman in a male-dominated world, Mrs. Tennant has been remembered mainly as a footnote in the lives of eminent men. This book recovers the lost life of Gertrude Tennant, drawing on a treasure-trove of recently discovered family papers - thousands of letters, including two dozen original letters from Flaubert to Gertrude, dozens of diaries, and many other unpublished documents relating to Stanley and other famous figures of the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. David Waller presents Gertrude Tennant's life in colourful detail, placing her not only at the heart of a multi-generational, matriarchal family epic but also at the centre of European social, literary, and intellectual life for the best part of a century.

  • The Primacy of Drawing - Histories and Theories of Practice

    This important and original book affirms the significance of drawing as visual thinking in western art from the fifteenth century to the present through an examination of its practice: how and why it is made, how it relates to other forms of visual production and theories of art, and what artists themselves have written about it. The author herself is a practicing artist, and through scrutinizing a wide range of drawings in various media, she confirms a long historical commitment to the primal importance of sketching in generating ideas and problem solving, examines the production of autonomous drawings as gifts or for pleasure, and traces the importance of the life-class and theories of drawing in the training of artists until well into the twentieth century. In the final chapters she address the changing role of drawing in relation to contemporary practice, and its importance for conceptual artists working in a non-hierarchical manner with a multiplicity of practices, techniques and technologies. Quoting the writings of artists from Vasari to Reynolds, Delacroix to Ruskin, Klee and Kandinsky to Beuys, Petherbridge proposes that drawing constitutes a discrete, if engaged, discourse within visual practice, with its own internal economy, its own typologies, codes, systems, materials and strategies of making; its own markets and collectors, its own power relations and self-representations. As well as analyzing specific works by great draughtsmen such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Goya and Picasso, close attention is paid to those artists traditionally regarded as 'minor' because of their graphic elaboration or involvement with caricature and play, as well as to the important contribution of women artists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The book is a response to the vibrant rediscovery of drawing as significant practice in studios, exhibitions and art schools, and proposes an ambitious and novel agenda for the study and enjoyment of drawing.

  • Consciousness - A User′s Guide

    A fascinating exploration of the nature of consciousness

    This engaging and readable book provides an introduction to consciousness that does justice both to the science and to the philosophy of consciousness, that is, the mechanics of the mind and the experience of awareness. The book opens with a general discussion of the brain and of consciousness itself. Then, exploring the areas of brain science most likely to illuminate the basis of awareness, Zeman focuses on the science of sleep and waking and on the science of vision. He describes healthy states and disorders--epilepsy, narcolepsy, blindsight and hallucinations after stroke--that provide insights into the capacity for consciousness and into its contents. And he tracks the evolution of the brain, the human species, and human culture and surveys the main current scientific theories of awareness, pioneering attempts to explain how the brain gives rise to experience.

    Zeman concludes by examining philosophical arguments about the nature of consciousness. A practicing neurologist, he animates his text with examples from the behavioral and neurological disorders of his patients and from the expanding mental worlds of young children, including his own. His book is an accessible and enlightening explanation of why we are conscious.

  • Imagining America - Icons of 20th-Century America Art

    An innovative and dynamic look at 20-century American art, focusing on its relationship to the nation's evolving identity and ambitions.

    How did artists of the twentieth century use their work to respond to their unique personal experiences and moment in history? This provocative question is explored in this engaging new book on American art. By focusing on broad, defining themes, embodied in the work of such pivotal artists as Georgia O'Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol, the authors look at how art provided a means for re-imagining America, visualizing what it had become, and where it might go in a century of turbulent change.
    Richly illustrated with 400 color images, Imagining America is organized around three main themes: nature and the ways diverse artists responded to the transformation of the landscape from pastoral to industrial; how artists as different as Thomas Eakins and Jackson Pollock demonstrated the perpetual inclination to reinvent both personal and national identity; and the ways that key artists like Stuart Davis, Andy Warhol, and Jean-Michel Basquiat taught us to understand the media and popular culture on a deeper level. The authors also provide a context of social history and parallel developments in American music and film.

    With an innovative design, a fabulous selection of iconic images, and an engaging juxtaposition of visual themes, Imagining America presents American art and artists in a completely new light.

  • The Jews of San Nicandro

    Not many people know of the utterly extraordinary events that took place in a humble southern Italian town in the first half of the twentieth century - and those who do have struggled to explain them. In the late 1920s, a crippled shoemaker had a vision where God called upon him to bring the Jewish faith to this dark corner in the Catholic heartlands, despite him having had no prior contact with Judaism itself. By 1938, about a dozen families had converted at one of the most troubled times for Italys Jews. The peasant community came under the watchful eyes of Mussolinis regime and the Catholic Church, but persisted in their new belief, eventually securing approval of their conversion from the rabbinical authorities, and emigrating to the newly founded State of Israel, where a community still exists today. In this first fully documented examination of the San Nicandro story, John Davis explains how and why these incredible events unfolded as they did. Using the converts own accounts and a wide range of hitherto unknown sources, Davis uncovers the everyday trials and tribulations within this community, and shows how they intersected with many key contemporary issues, including national identity and popular devotional cults, Fascist and Catholic persecution, Zionist networks and postwar Jewish refugees, and the mass exodus that would bring the Mediterranean peasant world to an end. Vivid and poignant, this book draws fresh and intriguing links between the astonishing San Nicandro affair and the wider transformation of twentieth-century Europe.

  • Managing for Stakeholders - Survival, Reputation and Success

    Managing for Stakeholders: Survival, Reputation, and Success, the culmination of twenty years of research, interviews, and observations in the workplace, makes a major new contribution to management thinking and practice. Current ways of thinking about business and stakeholder management usually ask the Value Allocation Question: How should we distribute the burdens and benefits of corporate activities among stakeholders? Managing for Stakeholders, however, helps leaders develop a mindset that instead asks the Value Creation Question: How can we create as much value as possible for all of our stakeholders? Business is about how customers, suppliers, employees, financiers (stockholders, bondholders, banks, etc.), communities, the media, and managers interact and create value. World-renowned management scholar R. Edward Freeman and his coauthors outline ten concrete principles and seven practical techniques for managing stakeholder relationships in order to ensure a firm's survival, reputation, and success. Managing for Stakeholders is a revolutionary book that will change not only how managers do business but also how they recognize and evaluate business opportunities that would otherwise be invisible.

  • William James - His Life & Thought

    This magisterial book is the first comprehensive interpretive and critical study of one of America's foremost philosophers and psychologists. Gerald Myers traces James's life and career and then uses this fresh biographical information to illuminate his writings and ideas.

  • The Bible And The People

    Since its first translation from the Latin, the Bible has become more and more accessible--and more and more influential

    In the eleventh century, the Bible was available only in expensive and rare hand-copied manuscripts. Today, millions of people from all walks of life seek guidance, inspiration, entertainment, and answers from their own editions of the Bible. This illustrated book tells the story of what happened to the ancient set of writings we call the Bible during those thousand years. Anchoring the story in material evidence--hundreds of different translations and versions of the Bible--Lori Anne Ferrell discusses how the Bible has been endlessly retailored to meet the changing needs of religion, politics, and the reading public while retaining its special status as a sacred text.

    Focusing on the English-speaking world, The Bible and the People charts the extraordinary voyage of the Bible from manuscript Bibles to the Gutenberg volumes, Bibles commissioned by kings and queens, the Eliot Indian Bible, salesmen's door-to-door Bibles, children's Bibles, Gideon Bibles, teen magazine Bibles, and more. Ferrell discusses the Bible's profound impact on readers over the centuries, and, in turn, the mark those readers made upon it. Enjoyable and informative, this book takes a fresh look at the fascinating and little-recognized connections among Christian, political, and book history.

  • Jonathan Edwards: A Life

    Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758) is a towering figure in American history. A controversial theologian and the author of the famous sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God, he ignited the momentous Great Awakening of the eighteenth century.

    In this definitive and long-awaited biography, Jonathan Edwards emerges as both a great American and a brilliant Christian. George Marsden evokes the world of colonial New England in which Edwards was reared--a frontier civilization at the center of a conflict between Native Americans, French Catholics, and English Protestants. Drawing on newly available sources, Marsden demonstrates how these cultural and religious battles shaped Edwards's life and thought. Marsden reveals Edwards as a complex thinker and human being who struggled to reconcile his Puritan heritage with the secular, modern world emerging out of the Enlightenment. In this, Edwards's life anticipated the deep contradictions of our American culture.

    Meticulously researched and beautifully composed, this biography offers a compelling portrait of an eminent American.

  • From Goods to a Good Life - Intellectual Property and Global Justice

    Most scholarship on intellectual property considers this law from the standpoint of law and economics. Under this conventional wisdom, intellectual property is simply a tool for promoting innovative products, from iPods to R2D2. In this highly original book Madhavi Sunder calls for a richer understanding of intellectual property law's effects on social and cultural life. Intellectual property does more than incentivize the production of more goods. This law fundamentally affects the ability of citizens to live a good life. Intellectual property law governs the abilities of human beings to make and share culture, and to profit from this enterprise in a global Knowledge economy. This book turns to social and cultural theory to more fully explore the deep connections between cultural production and human freedom.

  • American Modernism at the Art Institute of Chicago - World War I to 1955

    The first publication to focus on the Art Institute's outstanding collection of American modernism, this volume includes over 175 important paintings, sculptures, decorative art objects and works on paper made in North America between World War I and 1955. Together they fully reveal the history of American art in these decades, including examples of early modernism, Social Realism, Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism. Among the paintings are such iconic works as Hopper's 'Nighthawks' and Wood's 'American Gothic', along with notable pieces by Davis, De Kooning, Hartley, Lawrence, Marin, O'Keeffe, Pollock and Sheeler. Among the sculptors represented are Calder, Cornell and Noguchi. Spectacular decorative artwork by the Eameses, Grotell, Neutra, Saarinen, F. L. Wright and Zeisel are also featured. Illustrated in full colour, each work is accompanied by an accessible and up-to-date text, complete with comparative illustrations. The introduction traces the formation of this important collection by a number of noted curators, collectors, and patrons.

  • Reclaiming the Dead Sea Scrolls - The History of Judaism, Christianity, the Lost Libary of Qumran

    Dead Sea Scrolls expert Lawrence H. Schiffman shifts attention away from the sensationalism surrounding who has control of the scrolls by focusing on how these texts shed light on the history of Judaism and early Christianity.

  • The London Square - Gardens in the Midst of Town

    Modern-day London abounds with a multitude of gardens, enclosed by railings and surrounded by houses, which attest to the English love of nature. These green enclaves, known as squares, are among the most distinctive and admired features of the metropolis and are England's greatest contribution to the development of European town planning and urban form. Traditionally, inhabitants who overlooked these gated communal gardens paid for their maintenance and had special access to them. As such, they have long been synonymous with privilege, elegance, and prosperous metropolitan living. They epitomize the classical notion of rus in urbe, the integration of nature within the urban plan--a concept that continues to shape cities to this day.

    Todd Longstaffe-Gowan delves into the history, evolution, and social implications of squares, which have been an important element in the planning and expansion of London since the early 17th century. As an amenity that fosters health and well-being and a connection to the natural world, the square has played a crucial role in the development of the English capital.

  • The Culture of the New Capitalism

    A provocative and disturbing look at the ways new economic facts are shaping our personal and social values.

    The distinguished sociologist Richard Sennett surveys major differences between earlier forms of industrial capitalism and the more global, more febrile, ever more mutable version of capitalism that is taking its place. He shows how these changes affect everyday life--how the work ethic is changing; how new beliefs about merit and talent displace old values of craftsmanship and achievement; how what Sennett calls "the specter of uselessness" haunts professionals as well as manual workers; how the boundary between consumption and politics is dissolving.


    In recent years, reformers of both private and public institutions have preached that flexible, global corporations provide a model of freedom for individuals, unlike the experience of fixed and static bureaucracies Max Weber once called an "iron cage." Sennett argues that, in banishing old ills, the new-economy model has created new social and emotional traumas. Only a certain kind of human being can prosper in unstable, fragmentary institutions: the culture of the new capitalism demands an ideal self oriented to the short term, focused on potential ability rather than accomplishment, willing to discount or abandon past experience. In a concluding section, Sennett examines a more durable form of self hood, and what practical initiatives could counter the pernicious effects of "reform."

  • II Samuel

    II Samuel completes P. Kyle McCarter, Jr.'s study of the book of Samuel. Based upon the introduction and commentary of his first volume, McCarter continues the discussion of textual and literary sources as they relate to a reconstruction of historical events.

    A key issue for McCarter is accounting for the historical circumstances that led to the composition of the book of Samuel. In dialogue with major schools of thought pertaining to the origin and transmission of the book, the author offers his scholarly opinions on its composition. McCarter presents a unique new translation based upon the latest and most extensive textual sources available, including scrolls and fragments from Qumran. Furthermore, he resolves the complicated textual history of Samuel.

  • Lincolnshire

    Lincolnshire is incredibly rich in medieval churches from Saxon times onwards, many of them still little known. Lincoln Cathedral is justly famous, and second only to Durham in the grandeur of its setting. The prosperous years from the Middle Ages though to the eighteenth century have left a splendid legacy in the great town churches of Boston and Louth, in the innumerable village churches of the south of the county, the delightful manor houses (such as Tennyson's Somersby) and the Georgian town houses and coaching inns of Boston and Grantham, of Lincoln and Louth, and above all of Stamford. Monuments to industry include the vast maltings at Sleaford, the soaring dock tower of Grimsby, and an abundance of windmills.

  • Islamic Art and Architecture 650-1250

    This richly illustrated book provides an unsurpassed overview of Islamic art and architecture from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries, a time of the formation of a new artistic culture and its first, medieval, flowering in the vast area from the Atlantic to India. Inspired by Ettinghausen and Grabar's original text, this book has been completely rewritten and updated to take into account recent information and methodological advances.

    The volume focuses special attention on the development of numerous regional centers of art in Spain, North Africa, Egypt, Syria, Anatolia, Iraq, and Yemen, as well as the western and northeastern provinces of Iran. It traces the cultural and artistic evolution of such centers in the seminal early Islamic period and examines the wealth of different ways of creating a beautiful environment. The book approaches the arts with new classifications of architecture and architectural decoration, the art of the object, and the art of the book.
    With many new illustrations, often in color, this volume broadens the picture of Islamic artistic production and discusses objects in a wide range of media, including textiles, ceramics, metal, and wood. The book incorporates extensive accounts of the cultural contexts of the arts and defines the originality of each period. A final chapter explores the impact of Islamic art on the creativity of non-Muslims within the Islamic realm and in areas surrounding the Muslim world.

  • John La Farge′s Second Paradise - Voyages in the South Seas, 1890-1891

    In 1890, John La Farge (18351910) and his close friend, historian Henry Adams, embarked on a journey to the islands of the South Pacific, where the artist experienced a period of great creative output. This book showcases many of the most important oils, watercolours, and sketches to come out of La Farges two-year voyage to the islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans and is the first to place the artists South Seas work in the broader context of exotic travel by artists and writers of the 19th century. The essays in John La Farges Second Paradise explore the artists reemergence as a plein air landscape painter, his use of the sketchbook, and his late decorative work, which was reinvigorated by the experience of light and colour he discovered in the South Seas. Further discussions examine the prevailing notions of tropical paradise perpetuated since Captain Cooks discovery of Polynesia in the late 18th century, and offer the first extended comparison of the careers and art of La Farge and Paul Gauguin, who arrived in Tahiti only days after La Farge left in 1891. Featuring many previously unpublished works, this beautiful book is a major contribution to the study of La Farges life and art.

  • Rhyme′s Reason - A Guide to English Verse 3e

    In his classic text Rhyme's Reason the distinguished poet and critic John Hollander surveys the schemes, patterns, and forms of English verse, illustrating each variation with an original and witty self-descriptive example. In this substantially expanded and revised edition, Hollander adds a section of examples taken from centuries of poetry that exhibit the patterns he has described.

  • The Illusions of Entrepreneurship - The Costly Myths The Entrepreneurs, Investors and Policy Makers Live By

    There are far more entrepreneurs than most people realize. But the failure rate of new businesses is disappointingly high, and the economic impact of most of them disappointingly low, suggesting that enthusiastic would-be entrepreneurs and their investors all too often operate under a false set of assumptions. This book shows that the reality of entrepreneurship is decidedly different from the myths that have come to surround it. Scott Shane, a leading expert in entrepreneurial activity in the United States and other countries, draws on the data from extensive research to provide accurate, useful information about who becomes an entrepreneur and why, how businesses are started, which factors lead to success, and which predict a likely failure. 'The Illusions of Entrepreneurship' is an essential resource for everyone who has dreamed of starting a new business, for investors in start-ups, for policy makers attempting to facilitate the formation and survival of new businesses, and for researchers interested in the economic impact of entrepreneurial activity. Scott Shane offers research-based answers to these questions and many others: why do people start businesses? What industries are popular for start-ups? How many jobs do new businesses create? How do entrepreneurs finance their start-ups? What makes some locations and some countries more entrepreneurial than others? What are the characteristics of the typical entrepreneur? How well does the typical start-up perform? And, what strategies contribute to the survival and profitability of new businesses over time?

  • Inspiring Impressionism - The Impressionists and the Art of the Past

    Inspiring Impressionism explores links between Impressionists and the major European art-historical movements that came before them, demonstrating how often beneath the Impressionists' commitment to capturing contemporary life there lay a deep exploration of the art of the past. Presenting Impressionist works by artists including Manet, Monet, Degas, Bazille, Cassatt, and Cezanne alongside those of Raphael, El Greco, Rubens, Velazquez, and others, the book shows that while the Impressionists moved toward modernity and spontaneity, they remained conscious of and interested in the traditions, techniques, and subject matter of their predecessors.

    Essays by leading scholars reveal the ways Impressionists drew inspiration from earlier artists from periods ranging from the Italian Renaissance through the early 19th-century Classical and Romantic traditions. A detailed chronology and fascinating comparisons of landscapes, portraits, nudes, still lifes, and genre paintings provide readers with new opportunities to understand the work of both the Impressionists and Old Masters.

  • First and Second Letters to Timothy

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    The letters of Paul to Timothy, one of his favorite delegates, often make for difficult reading in today's world. They contain much that make modern readers uncomfortable, and much that is controversial, including pronouncements on the place of women in the Church and on homosexuality, as well as polemics against the so-called "false teachers." They have also been of a source of questions within the scholarly community, where the prevailing opinion since the nineteenth century is that someone else wrote the letters and signed Paul's name in order to give them greater authority.

    Using the best of modern and ancient scholarship, Luke Timothy Johnson provides clear, accessible commentary that will help lay readers navigate the letters and better understand their place within the context Paul's teachings. Johnson's conclusion that they were indeed written by Paul himself ensures that this volume, like the other Anchor Bible Commentaries, will attract the attention of theologians and other scholars.

  • Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun - The Odyssey of an Artist in an Age of Revolution

    The story of Marie Antoinette's portraitist, a remarkable woman living in dangerous times

    The foremost woman artist of her age, Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun (1755--1842) exerted her considerable charm to become the friend, and then official portraitist, of Marie Antoinette. Though profitable, this role made Vigee Le Brun a public and controversial figure, and in 1789 it precipitated her exile. In a Europe torn by strife and revolution, she nevertheless managed to thrive as an independent, self-supporting artist, doggedly setting up studios in Rome, Naples, Venice, Milan, Vienna, St. Petersburg, and London. Long overlooked or dismissed, Vigee Le Brun's portraits now hang in the Louvre, in a room of their own, as well as in all leading art museums of the world.


    This gripping biography tells the story of a singularly gifted and high-spirited woman during the revolutionary era and explores the development and significance of her art. The book also recounts the public and private lives of Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun, connecting her with such personalities of her age as Catherine the Great, Napoleon, and Benjamin Franklin, and setting her experiences in the context of contemporary European politics and culture. A generous selection of illustrations, including sixteen of Vigee Le Brun's portraits presented in full color, completes this exceptional volume.

  • Konstantin Grcic - Decisive Design

    The hip, functional, and versatile furniture and products of Konstantin Grcic - widely recognized as one of the most important designers working today - are transforming the landscape of contemporary design. This book accompanies the first exhibition in North America of Grcic's work, highlighting the innovative archetypes of form and concept that have marked his remarkable output since 2004. Grcic delights in creating fresh takes on familiar industrial objects, whether desks, chairs, benches, stools, a range of kitchen equipment, lamps, a set of salad servers, or Krups coffee makers. In his recent work, he has blended his characteristic simplicity and distinctiveness with the use of new technologies and materials - for example, a cantilevered stacking chair, Myto (2008), is made from a strong, fluid plastic typically used by the automotive industry.

  • Liberty′s Dawn - A People′s History of the Industrial Revolution

    This remarkable book looks at hundreds of autobiographies penned between 1760 and 1900 to offer an intimate firsthand account of how the Industrial Revolution was experienced by the working class. The Industrial Revolution brought not simply misery and poverty. On the contrary, Griffin shows how it raised incomes, improved literacy, and offered exciting opportunities for political action. For many, this was a period of new, and much valued, sexual and cultural freedom. This rich personal account focuses on the social impact of the Industrial Revolution, rather than its economic and political histories. In the tradition of best-selling books by Liza Picard, Judith Flanders, and Jerry White, Griffin gets under the skin of the period and creates a cast of colourful characters, including factory workers, miners, shoemakers, carpenters, servants, and farm labourers.

  • Julian Onderdonk: American Impressionist

    This lavishly illustrated catalogue offers a critical look at Impressionist Julian Onderdonk (18821922), one of Texas's finest landscape painters and a pupil of William Merritt Chase. Onderdonk transformed the Texan landscape, creating indelible images of his native state. One of Chases most dazzling students at the Shinnecock Summer School in Long Island, he brought Chases aesthetic of nature to an entirely new part of the American landscape. By his death at the age of 40, Onderdonk had been christened 'The Bluebonnet Painter' in recognition of his lush signature landscapes featuring fields of the state flower. The essays examine the relationship between Chase and Onderdonk and how that dialogue transformed the way the latter viewed Texas. They also address Onderdonks relationship to the Western American tradition of landscape painting. Readers and viewers interested in American landscape, American Impressionism, and Southwestern art will enjoy both the critical essays and the beautiful illustrations - many never before seen.

  • Fred Astaire

    Joseph Epstein's 'Fred Astaire' investigates the great dancer's magical talent, taking up the story of his life, his personality, his work habits, his modest pretensions, and above all his accomplishments. Written with the wit and grace the subject deserves, 'Fred Astaire' provides a remarkable portrait of this extraordinary artist and how he came to embody for Americans a fantasy of easy elegance and, more complicatedly, of democratic aristocracy. Tracing Astaire's life from his birth in Omaha to his death in his late eighties in Hollywood, the book discusses his early days with his talented and outspoken sister Adele, his gifts as a singer (Irving Berlin, George Gershwin and Jerome Kern all delighted in composing for Astaire), and his many movie dance partners, among them Rita Hayworth, Eleanor Powell, Cyd Charisse and Betty Hutton. A key chapter of the book is devoted to Astaire's somewhat unwilling partnership with Ginger Rogers, the woman with whom he danced most dazzlingly of all. What emerges from these pages is a fascinating view of an American era, seen through the accomplishments of Fred Astaire, an unassuming but perfectionist performer who transformed entertainment into art and gave America a new and yet enduring standard for style.

  • Henry V: The Conscience of a King

    More than just a single-minded warrior-king, Henry V comes to life in this fresh account as a gifted ruler acutely conscious of spiritual matters and his subjects' welfare

    Shakespeare's centuries-old portrayal of Henry V established the king's reputation as a warmongering monarch, a perception that has persisted ever since. But in this exciting, thoroughly researched volume a different view of Henry emerges: a multidimensional ruler of great piety, a hands-on governor who introduced a radically new conception of England's European role in secular and ecclesiastical affairs, a composer of music, an art patron, and a dutiful king who fully appreciated his obligations toward those he ruled.

    Historian Malcolm Vale draws on extensive primary archival evidence that includes many documents annotated or endorsed in Henry's own hand. Focusing on a series of themes--the interaction between king and church, the rise of the English language as a medium of government and politics, the role of ceremony in Henry's kingship, and more--Vale revises understandings of Henry V and his conduct of the everyday affairs of England, Normandy, and the kingdom of France.

  • Brick and Clay Building in Britain

    'Brick and Clay Building in Britain' has been widely praised both for its clear and well-balanced text and for the quality of the illustrations. This new edition includes a fascinating account of how bricks, brick files and terracotta have been made and used from medieval times to the present day. There is an illustrated glossary of brickwork where virtually every term is shown in photographs and diagrams and a chronological photographic survey ranges from the earliest survivors to the twentieth century. Finally there is an introduction to the use of unbaked earth in different locations in England and Wales, Scotland and Ireland and internationally. Appendices cover the Brick Tax, cavity walling and damp proof courses, the use of Header Bond in brickwork, and brickwork in Scotland and Ireland. The bibliography has been enlarged and brought up to date.

  • The Global Spread of Fertility Decline - Population, Fear, and Uncertainty

    The world's population has grown by five billion people over the past century, an astounding 300 percent increase. Yet it is actually the decline in family size and population growth that is the issue attracting greatest concern in many countries. This eye-opening book looks at demographic trends in Europe, North America, and Asia--areas that now have low fertility rates--and argues that there is an essential yet often neglected political dimension to a full assessment of these trends. Political decisions that promote or discourage marriage and childbearing, facilitate or discourage contraception and abortion, and stimulate or restrain immigration all have played significant roles in recent trends.

  • Ruskin on Venice - The Paradise of Cities

    For John Ruskin, one of the leading cultural critics of the nineteenth century, Venice represented his ideal of civic society, where culture, government and faith were in creative harmony - 'The Paradise of Cities'. This was not the fallen city of the Renaissance, the Paradise Lost that it became in his lifetime, but the Gothic Eden that he imagined had existed before the sixteenth century. In this elegant and compelling book, Ruskin's long and intricate relationship with the city is traced: from 1835 he watched Venice change from post-Napoleonic ruin to a province of the Austrian Empire, and then experience new ruin in the revolution of 1848. Venice was witness to the failure of his marriage, and, later, the collapse of his hopes for a new one. By the time of Ruskin's final visit in 1888, the march of modernity had made Venice a dead replica of its former glory. Robert Hewison shows how Ruskin shed his Romantic vision, formed by Byron and Turner, and developed a harder, clearer conception of neglected Gothic Venice through an intense study of the city's physical fabric that changed international understanding of the city. He highlights the parallel drawn by Ruskin between the Venetian and British Empires, a warning that sounds throughout his key work, 'The Stones of Venice', and he reveals how, later, Veronese and Carpaccio helped Ruskin articulate the changes in his religious and social beliefs. Carpaccio's paintings also became the frame for Ruskin's private myth: his tragic love for Rose La Touche, which reached its crisis in Venice in 1876. Drawing on the rich resources of Ruskin's drawings, architectural notebooks and manuscripts (including previously unpublished daguerreotypes from Ruskin's own collection), Hewison offers fresh insights into both Ruskin and Venice and reveals how Ruskin's work and his connection with the city from youth to old age have helped to shape the image of the Venice we know today.

  • Portrait in Light and Shadow - The Life of Yousuf Karsh

    Yousuf Karsh is acknowledged to be the twentieth century's leading portrait photographer, whose iconic images of Bogart, Hemingway, Churchill, the Kennedys, Auden, Castro, Einstein, the Clintons, Khrushchev, Casals, Elizabeth II inhabit the mind's eye of anyone familiar with photographic history. A refugee from the ethnic cleansing of Turkish Armenians in 1916, Karsh made his home in Boston and Ottawa, but travelled the globe during his 60-year career, photographing political leaders, celebrities, monarchs and movie stars. He died in 2002, aged 94. His archive contains 50,000 portraits. This is the first biography, written with help from his family and colleagues, and based on the Karsh archive in Ottawa. It will mark Karsh's centenary in 2008, when retrospective exhibitions are scheduled in a number of locations in North America (Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Art Institute of Chicago, Boston Public Library, Rhode Island School of Design).

  • A Modern World - American Design from the Yale University Art Gallery, 1920-1950

    The Yale University Art Gallery is home to an amazing collection of American decorative arts. 'A Modern World' provides a comprehensive look at the Gallery's holdings of modernist design made in America or for the American market. The catalogue features a mix of high-style decorative arts, industrial design and everyday objects, including furniture by Paul T. Frankl, handwrought sterling silver, Ruth Reeves textiles, mass-produced Revere housewares, and costume jewellery. The authors consider modernism broadly, establishing a context for the objects within larger international developments in painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architecture. Entries are arranged in a series of chronological, thematic groups, offering new and compelling juxtapositions. Each group is introduced by an essay that presents the social, ideological and aesthetic themes that unify the objects.

  • Italian Paintings from the Richard L. Feigen Collection

    Richard L. Feigen has amassed a collection of Italian paintings that is widely admired for its depth and quality, especially for the works it features by the principal masters of the early Italian Renaissance. This beautifully illustrated catalogue of the complete collection presents rare masterpieces by artists from Bernardo Daddi to Fra Angelico, Orazio Gentileschi's 'Danae', Annibale Carracci's 'Virgin and Child' and precious, small-scale coppers by major Mannerist and Baroque masters. 'Italian Paintings from the Richard L. Feigen Collection' catalogues more than fifty major works from the 14th to the 17th century, and is the first publication of this remarkable and important collection.

  • The Anthology of Rap

    An extraordinary collection of lyrics showcasing rap's poetic depth and diversity

    From the school yards of the South Bronx to the tops of the Billboard charts, rap has emerged as one of the most influential musical and cultural forces of our time. In The Anthology of Rap, editors Adam Bradley and Andrew DuBois explore rap as a literary form, demonstrating that rap is also a wide-reaching and vital poetic tradition born of beats and rhymes.

    This pioneering anthology brings together more than three hundred rap and hip-hop lyrics written over thirty years, from the "old school" to the "golden age" to the present day. Rather than aim for encyclopedic coverage, Bradley and DuBois render through examples the richness and diversity of rap's poetic tradition. They feature both classic lyrics that helped define the genre, including Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five's "The Message" and Eric B. & Rakim's "Microphone Fiend," as well as lesser-known gems like Blackalicious's "Alphabet Aerobics" and Jean Grae's "Hater's Anthem."

    Both a fan's guide and a resource for the uninitiated, The Anthology of Rap showcases the inventiveness and vitality of rap's lyrical art. The volume also features an overview of rap poetics and the forces that shaped each period in rap's historical development, as well as a foreword by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and afterwords by Chuck D and Common. Enter the Anthology to experience the full range of rap's artistry and discover a rich poetic tradition hiding in plain sight.

  • Redesigning the American Lawn - A Search for Environmental Harmony 2e

    Americans love their lawns with a passion rarely seen in other countries; fifty-eight million Americans enthusiastically plant, weed, water, spray, and mow an estimated twenty million acres of lawn. But is our dedication to these lawns contributing to the serious environmental problems facing the planet? The authors in this book state that the lawn may be an ecological anachronism, and they argue that we must rethink the way we care for our lawns so that these small pieces of the environment will demonstrate our commitment to a more ecologically sound world. The authors outline the origins of ideas about the lawn and the reasons for its enduring popularity. They describe the development of ideas about its form and the making of the lawn into an object of beauty. They explain how the lawn industry has encouraged the spread of the "industrial" lawn to sustain high sales of mowers, seeds, fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation equipment. However, say the authors, Industrial Lawns can have high environmental costs: for example, power motors contribute to regional air pollution and global warming; excess fertilizers and pesticides wash off our lawns and run into our wells, streams, and lakes; grass clippings that are bagged and hauled away are major contributors to solid waste problems; and the watering of lawns depletes scarce water supplies. How can we create environmentally sound lawns? The authors offer a variety of ideas - such as moderation in our use of lawn supplements, ecological use of grass varieties, the substitution of hand mowers for power motors, and the use of grass clippings to fertilize the lawn. These strategies can help us to care for conventional lawns in ways lessdangerous to the environment. They also propose two more radical alternatives: Freedom Lawns that allow natural and unrestricted growth of grasses, clover, wildflowers, and other broad-leafed herbaceous plants; and total replacement of the lawn with new landscape designs. By choosing

  • Croatia - A Nation Forged in War 3e

    In this book an eyewitness to the breakup of Yugoslavia provides the first full account of the rise, fall, and rebirth of Croatia from its medieval origins to today's tentative peace. Marcus Tanner describes the creation of the first Croatian state; its absorption into feudal Hungary in the Middle Ages; the catastrophic experience of the Ottoman invasion; the absorption of the diminished country into Habsburg Austria; the evolution of modern Croatian nationalism after the French Revolution; and the circumstances that propelled Croatia into the arms of Nazi Germany and the brutal, home-grown "Ustashe" movement in the Second World War. Finally, drawing on firsthand knowledge of many of the leading figures in the conflict, Tanner explains the failure of Tito's Communists to solve Yugoslavia's tortured national problem by creating a federal state, and the violent implosion after his death.

  • Goddess - The Classical Mode

    From the emblematic designs of Madame Gres to Isadora Duncan's dance costumes and the avant-garde gowns of Yves Saint Laurent, the Greco-Roman classical tradition of dress has clearly inspired and influenced the worlds of art and fashion. This beautifully illustrated book explores the continually evolving influence of classical dress through the ages, presenting a historical survey of this fascinating theme. Featured works include paintings, photographs, sculpture, and decorative objects from Greek and Roman times to the present as well as garments dating from the eighteenth century and recent creations by designers such as Tom Ford of Gucci and Issey Miyake.

  • Pop Art Is

    On January 26, 1957, Richard Hamilton wrote a now-famous letter outlining his definition of what 'Pop Art Is'. This volume celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of Hamilton's prophetic document, presenting the works of more than forty artists from his own generation of Pop artists (among them Hamilton himself, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, and Andy Warhol) and from artists of subsequent generations who have contributed to the development and dissemination of Pop Art (Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Mike Kelley, Damien Hirst, and others). A text by Greil Marcus, a photographic essay by Louise Lawler, and an interview with Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown by Dan Graham are included in the book, which illuminates the powerful, international impact of Pop Art throughout the second half of the 20th century. Pop represented a sudden and dramatic expansion of often-contradictory possibilities, and for this reason and others the concept of Pop remains vital in contemporary art.

  • Fandom Unbound - Otaku Culture in a Connected Age

    In recent years, otaku culture has emerged as one of Japan's major cultural exports and as a genuinely transnational phenomenon. This timely volume investigates how this once marginalized popular culture has come to play a major role in Japan's identity at home and abroad. In the American context, the word otaku is best translated as 'geek' - an ardent fan with highly specialized knowledge and interests. But it is associated especially with fans of specific Japan-based cultural genres, including anime, manga and video games. Most important of all, as this collection shows, is the way otaku culture represents a newly participatory fan culture in which fans not only organize around niche interests but produce and distribute their own media content. In this collection of essays, Japanese and American scholars offer richly detailed descriptions of how this once stigmatized Japanese youth culture created its own alternative markets and cultural products such as fan fiction, comics, costumes and remixes, becoming a major international force that can challenge the dominance of commercial media. By exploring the rich variety of otaku culture from multiple perspectives, this groundbreaking collection provides fascinating insights into the present and future of cultural production and distribution in the digital age.

  • The Dress of the People - Everyday Fashion in Eighteenth-Century England

    Material things transformed the lives of ordinary English men and women between the restoration of Charles II in 1660 and the Great Reform Act of 1832. Tea and sugar, the fruits of British mercantile and colonial expansion, transformed their diets. Pendulum clocks and Staffordshire pottery, the products of British manufacturing ingenuity, enriched their homes. But it was in their clothes that ordinary people enjoyed the greatest transformation in their material lives. In calico gowns and muslin neckerchiefs, in wigs and silver-plated shoe buckles they flaunted the fruits of the nation's commercial prosperity. This book retrieves the unknown story of ordinary consumers in eighteenth-century England and what they wore. John Styles reveals that ownership of new fabrics and new fashions was not confined to the rich. It extended far down the social scale to the small farmers, day labourers, and petty tradespeople who formed a majority of the population. Styles reveals that humble men and women could be beneficiaries of the new kind of commercial society that emerged in eighteenth-century England, and not just its victims. He does so by focusing on three issues: the clothes they wore, the ways they acquired them, and the meanings they attached to them. The clothes worn by ordinary men and women were not all basic or utilitarian. What they called their best clothes reflected the broad trends of high fashion, although they were not worn simply to emulate the lifestyles of the rich. Fashionable display by ordinary consumers was rooted in a world of popular custom, of fairs and holidays, of parish feasts and harvest homes. Popular custom and popular consumerism were allies, not enemies. This inventive and lucid book sheds new light on topics as diverse as crime, authority and retailing in eighteenth-century Britain , as well making a major contribution to broader debates around consumerism, popular culture and material life.

  • The Library at Night

    Inspired by the process of creating a library for his fifteenth-century home near the Loire in France, Alberto Manguel, the acclaimed writer on books and reading, has taken up the subject of libraries. 'Libraries', he says, 'have always seemed to me pleasantly mad places, and for as long as I can remember I've been seduced by their labyrinthine logic'. In this personal, deliberately unsystematic, and wide-ranging book, he offers a captivating meditation on the meaning of libraries. Manguel, a guide of irrepressible enthusiasm, conducts a unique library tour that extends from his childhood bookshelves to the 'complete' libraries of the Internet, from Ancient Egypt and Greece to the Arab world, from China and Rome to Google. He ponders the doomed library of Alexandria as well as the personal libraries of Charles Dickens, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. He recounts stories of people who have struggled against tyranny to preserve freedom of thought - the Polish librarian who smuggled books to safety as the Nazis began their destruction of Jewish libraries; the Afghani bookseller who kept his store open through decades of unrest. Oral 'memory libraries' kept alive by prisoners, libraries of banned books, the imaginary library of Count Dracula, the library of books never written - Manguel illuminates the mysteries of libraries as no other writer could. With scores of wonderful images throughout, The Library at Night is a fascinating voyage through Manguel's mind, memory, and vast knowledge of books and civilizations.

  • Learn to Write the Hebrew Script - Aleph Through the Aleph Through the Looking Glass

    Learn to Write the Hebrew Script presents a new and innovative approach to learning the Hebrew script. Drawing on the common ancestry of European and Hebrew alphabets and the natural inclinations of the writing hand, Orr-Stav shows how the Hebrew script may be understood and acquired almost intuitively through a three-step transformation of ordinary Roman-script cursive. Thoroughly researched but written with a light touch and the empathy of someone who's been there, Learn to Write the Hebrew Script uncovers several surprises and dispels much of the mystique of what is often an intimidating subject, making the script of the Old Testament much more accessible to millions of non-Hebrew speakers worldwide. "What sets this book apart is its novel approach to the subject, which offers the Western reader a far more accessible and less intimidating approach to the subject."-J.P. Kang, Princeton Theological Seminary "A completely novel approach to this knotty problem. For anyone who wants or needs to learn Hebrew, this book is a must, a valuable adjunct to any teaching aid."-Josephine Bacon, American Translators Association Chronicle "This quirky, unexpected, and utterly charming book offers a three-step method for learning to write Hebrew script, and the author has a gift for presenting the technical and abstract clearly and disarmingly."-The Jerusalem Report

  • People′s Witness - The Journalist in Modern Politics

    Now, more than ever, political journalists are central figures in the titanic struggles of modern history, not only telling us about events but also interpreting them and shaping our views. This engrossing book explores the relationship between journalism and politics in the twentieth century and tells the stories of the journalists--both good and bad--who have played major roles.

    Fred Inglis tracks the flamboyant biographies of giants of the genre, from the early newspapermen during the Russian revolution to those who reported on the Spanish Civil War, the hideous discoveries at Dachau, and the fall of the Berlin Wall. He scrutinizes news proprietors such as Joseph Pulitzer, Katharine Graham, and Rupert Murdoch; writer-journalists like George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh, Andre Malraux, and Martha Gellhorn; and journalists of conscience--William Shirer in Nazi Germany, James Cameron in Asia, Neil Sheehan in Vietnam, Norman Mailer at the Pentagon, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein after Watergate, and others. Inglis examines the great pioneers of broadcast news journalism, notably Ed Murrow, Walter Cronkite, and Alistair Cooke, as well as such contemporary journalists as Christopher Hitchens and the BBC's John Simpson. He explores the relations between political journalists and their all-powerful proprietors and exposes fascinating instances of pomposity, misjudgment, and downright untruthfulness, as well as moments of courage and responsibility.

    In turns wise, insightful, funny, and biting, this sweeping narrative measures each journalist against the best principles of the vocation and silhouettes some of their most dramatic life stories against the moral horizons of the epoch.

  • Maurizio Cattelan - Is There Life Before Death?

    The subversive, often jarringly direct sculptures of Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan (b. 1960) are acclaimed for their seemingly absurd juxtapositions and uncanny photorealism. Reflecting deep suspicions of religious and political authorities, these constructions serve as sardonic critiques of existing power structures, forcing the viewer to challenge his or her understanding of symbols, both iconic and commonplace. This publication features new works by Cattelan, as well as several of his large-scale pieces dating from 2003-7, all of which are considered in the context of the Menil's remarkable holdings, with a focus on contemporary art. To this end, we see how works by artists such as Lucio Fontana, Robert Morris, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly and Andy Warhol 'converse' with Cattelan's. With commentary from Franklin Sirmans, as well as selections of dialogue between curator and artist, this book presents the rare opportunity to appreciate Cattelan's works amid the backdrop of the twentieth century.

  • Samuel Colt - Arms, Art and Invention

    The fascinating story of the American inventor and manufacturer who perfected the revolver

    Samuel Colt (1814-1862) first patented his "Colt" revolver in 1835 and thereby redefined the architecture of handguns. This stunning book is the first to present in detail the evolution of his most famous invention and to document the unsurpassed Colt firearms collections held by the Wadsworth Atheneum.
    Colt designed his revolvers with an artistic sensibility--paying particular attention to form and beauty and juxtaposing colors and finishes to heighten the visual effects. He was also one of the first American manufacturers to secure celebrity endorsements and to commission paintings by renowned artists like George Catlin to promote his arms. Colt's standards for excellence, industrial foresight, and quest for market domination are explored in light of primary documents that reveal his constant battles to protect his patents.
    Essays discuss Colt's personal collection of historic firearms as well as the memorial collection of Colt-manufactured firearms, the relationship between art and commerce as they pertain to the inventor's career, and his international celebrity. Richly illustrated and beautifully produced, this volume presents the artistry of the firearms that Colt worked so diligently to perfect--as well as his promotional abilities that made a tremendous impact on American culture.

  • Joaquin Torres-garcia: Constructing Abstraction With Wood

    Joaquin Torres-Garcia (1874-1949) is one of the most influential artists to have emerged from Latin America in the early 20th century. His unique innovations in the medium of wood - constructed three-dimensional grids and planes known as maderas - foreshadow later artistic developments in Europe and the Americas (such as the work of Louise Nevelson). Torres-Garcia was also much celebrated for his work as a modernist painter, teacher, and author. This handsome catalogue focuses on Torres-Garcia's wood constructions and accompanies the first exhibition held in North America of these works and the first solo exhibition of the artist in the United States in over forty years. It includes essays by prominent scholars that discuss the creation of the maderas and their place in the debates surrounding abstract art in Paris in the late 1920s and early 1930s and in Montevideo, his hometown in Uruguay, in the late 1930s and 40s. It also includes newly translated writings by the artist.

  • The English Castle - 1066-1650

    From coast to coast, the English landscape is still richly studded with castles both great and small. As homes or ruins, these historic buildings are today largely objects of curiosity. For centuries, however, they were at the heart of the kingdom's social and political life. The English Castle is a riveting architectural study that sets this legion of buildings in historical context, tracing their development from the Norman Conquest in 1066 through the civil wars of the 1640s.

    In this magnificent, compellingly written volume, which includes over 350 illustrations, John Goodall brings to life the history of the English castle over six centuries. In it he explores the varied architecture of these buildings and describes their changing role in warfare, politics, domestic living, and governance.

  • Masterpieces of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism - The Annenberg Collection

    The Walter and Leonore Annenberg Collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, watercolors, and drawings constitutes one of the most remarkable groupings of avant-garde works of art from the mid-19th to the early 20th century ever given to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. A revised and expanded edition of the 1989 publication Masterpieces of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism: The Annenberg Collection, this handsome volume presents more than fifty masterworks by such luminaries as Manet, Degas, Morisot, Renoir, Monet, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Picasso, and Matisse, accompanied by elucidating texts and a wealth of comparative illustrations.

  • The Warsaw Ghetto - A Guide to the Perished City

    Without question, the establishment and liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto has become an icon of the Holocaust experience. Remarkably, a full history of the Ghetto has never been written, despite the publication over some sixty years of numerous memoirs, studies, biographical accounts and primary documents. 'The Warsaw Ghetto: A Guide to the Perished City' is this history, researched and written with painstaking care and devotion over many years and now published for the first time in English. The authors explore the history of the ghetto's evolution, the actual daily experience of its thousands of inhabitants from its creation in 1941 to its liquidation following the uprising of 1943. Encyclopedic in scope, the book encompasses a range of topics from food supplies to education, religious activities to the Judenrat's administration. Separate chapters deal with the mass deportations to Treblinka and the famous uprising. A series of original maps, along with biographies, a glossary, and a bibliography, completes this masterful work.

  • The Future of Reputation - Gossip, Rumour, and Privacy on the Internet

    What information about you is available on the Internet? What if it's wrong, humiliating, or true but regrettable? Will it ever go away?

    Teeming with chatrooms, online discussion groups, and blogs, the Internet offers previously unimagined opportunities for personal expression and communication. But there's a dark side to the story. A trail of information fragments about us is forever preserved on the Internet, instantly available in a Google search. A permanent chronicle of our private lives--often of dubious reliability and sometimes totally false--will follow us wherever we go, accessible to friends, strangers, dates, employers, neighbors, relatives, and anyone else who cares to look. This engrossing book, brimming with amazing examples of gossip, slander, and rumor on the Internet, explores the profound implications of the online collision between free speech and privacy. Daniel Solove, an authority on information privacy law, offers a fascinating account of how the Internet is transforming gossip, the way we shame others, and our ability to protect our own reputations. Focusing on blogs, Internet communities, cybermobs, and other current trends, he shows that, ironically, the unconstrained flow of information on the Internet may impede opportunities for self-development and freedom. Long-standing notions of privacy need review, the author contends: unless we establish a balance between privacy and free speech, we may discover that the freedom of the Internet makes us less free.

  • Hitler, the Germans and the Final Solution

    This book is the culmination of more than three decades of meticulous historiographic research on Nazi Germany by one of the period's most distinguished historians. The volume brings together the most important and influential aspects of Ian Kershaw's research on the Holocaust for the first time. The writings are arranged in three sections: Hitler and the 'Final Solution', popular opinion and the Jews in Nazi Germany, and the 'Final Solution' in historiography. Kershaw provides an introduction and a closing section on the uniqueness of Nazism. Kershaw was a founding historian of the social history of the Third Reich, and he has throughout his career conducted pioneering research on the societal causes and consequences of Nazi policy. His work has brought much to light concerning the ways in which the attitudes of the German populace shaped and did not shape Nazi policy. This volume presents a comprehensive, multi-faceted picture both of the destructive dynamic of the Nazi leadership and of the attitudes and behaviour of ordinary Germans as the persecution of the Jews spiraled into total genocide.

  • The Frescoes From the Roman Villa of P. Fanniius Synistor at Boscoreale

    When Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79, burying much of the region around the Bay of Naples in lava, one of the extraordinary Roman villas thereby preserved was that of P. Fannius Synistor at Boscoreale. Its discovery in 1899 revealed breathtaking wall paintings that were dispersed in 1903, with major portions acquired by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The cleaning and reinstallation of these masterpieces has occasioned the creation of a virtual model that for the first time has allowed the authors to situate the surviving frescoes from the villa in their original relation to each other.

  • Frank Stella - Painting into Architecture

    Since the early 1990s, the American artist Frank Stella (b. 1936) has designed various architectural structures, including a band shell, pavilions, and museums. This book demonstrates how Stella's formal concerns have evolved from paintings to wall reliefs to freestanding sculptures that extend into architecture. Included are illustrations of the 25 works in the accompanying exhibition that range from small models to a portion of a building at full scale. Photographs of works by architects who have influenced Stella are also featured.

  • Art, Marriage, And Family In The Florentine Renaissance Palace

    A beautifully illustrated account of life behind the walls of a Florentine Renaissance home

    Although we live in an era when vast sums of money are lavished on wedding festivities, we are not unique: in Renaissance Italy, middle- and upper-class families spent enormous amounts on marriages that were intended to establish or consolidate the status and lineage of one or both of the respective families.

    This lavishly illustrated book explores the social and economic background to marriage in Renaissance Florence and discusses the objects--paintings, sculptures, furniture, jewelry, clothing, and household items--associated with marriage and ongoing family life. By analyzing urban palaces and their furnishings, Jacqueline Marie Musacchio shows how families interacted with art on a daily basis. This began at marriage, when the bride brought a dowry and the groom provided the home and its furnishings. It continued with the accumulation of objects during the marriage and the birth of children. And it ended with the redistribution of these same objects at death. Through the examination of art, documents, literature, and more, this lively book traces the life cycle of the Florentine Renaissance family through the art and objects that surrounded them in their home.

  • Treasure-House of the Language - The Living OED

    The legendary Oxford English Dictionary today contains over 600,000 words and a staggering 2,500,000 quotations to illuminate the meaning and history of those words. A glorious, bursting treasure-house, the OED serves as a guardian of the literary jewels of the past, a testament to the richness of the English language today, and a guarantor of future understanding of the language. In this book, Charlotte Brewer begins her account of the OED at the point where others have stopped, with the publication of the final instalment of the first edition in 1928, and carries it through to the metamorphosis of the dictionary into a twenty-first-century electronic medium. Brewer describes the difficulties of keeping the OED up-to-date over time and recounts the recurring debates over finances, treatment of contentious words, public vs. scholarly expectations, proper sources of quotations, and changing editorial practices. With humour and empathy, she portrays the predilections and personalities of the editors, publishers, and assistants who undertook the Sisyphean task of keeping apace with the modern explosion of vocabulary. Utilizing rich archives in Oxford as well as new electronic resources, the author uncovers a history no less complex and fascinating than the Oxford English Dictionary itself.

  • Benjamin V. Cohen - Archtitect of the New Deal

    A key figure in the administrations of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, Benjamin V. Cohen (1894-1983) was a major architect of public policy from the first days of FDR's presidency through the early days of the Cold War. Although he kept a low public profile, Cohen's influence extended across a wide range of domestic and foreign policy initiatives. In this biography, William Lasser offers the first account of Ben Cohen's life and career, and an assessment of his contribution to the origin and development of modern American liberalism.

    Cohen's life provides an extraordinary lens through which to view the development of the evolving political philosophy of the Roosevelt and Truman presidencies. A brilliant lawyer noted for his good judgment and experience, Cohen was a leading member of FDR's "Brain Trust," developing ideas, drafting legislation, lobbying within the administration and in Congress, and defending the New Deal in court. The book traces his contributions to domestic financial policy, his activities during the war years in London and Washington, his service as counselor to the State Department and member of the American delegation to the United Nations after the war, and his role in the American Zionist movement. From Cohen's life and work, Lasser draws important insights into the development of the New Deal and the evolution of postwar liberalism.

  • The Euro: The Politics of the New Global Currency

    First published in March 2009 to widespread acclaim, this is the first comprehensive political and economic account of the birth and development of the Euro. Today the Euro is the supranational currency for fifteen European countries and the world's second largest reserve currency. David Marsh tells the story of the rivalries, intrigues, and deal-making that brought about a currency for Europe, and he analyzes the achievements and shortcomings of its first decade of existence. While the Euro represents a remarkable triumph of political will, great pressures are building on the single currency. Drawing on more than 100 interviews with leading figures associated with the Euro, and scores of secret documents from international archives, Marsh underscores the Euro's importance for the global economy, in particular for the U.S. and British economic and political agendas. Hidden facts and fresh insights from 'The Euro' include: how the legacy of France and Germany's tortuous relations affects it; why the UK is unlikely to accept the Euro before 2025; the impact on the Euro of the US credit crisis; how the Euro has rebounded against the aspirations of its founders; how Italy and Spain have massively lost competitiveness; and, why radical changes must be adopted to prevent a European upheaval.

  • John Singer Sargent - Figures and Landscapes, 1883-1899 - The Complete Paintings V 5

    Volume Five of the John Singer Sargent catalogue raisonne encompasses a remarkably productive sixteen-year span when Sargent's creative energies were expressed in new and exciting aesthetic ventures. The young artist moved from Paris to London and successfully ignited his career as a portrait painter. His first years in England included a pastoral interlude during which he experimented with Impressionist techniques, painting en plein air and producing vibrant landscape, figure, and flower studies. Sargent's lush and seductive outdoor scenes and his concern with the depiction of light - most fully realized in his exquisite Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose - are chronicled in this volume. Of special significance is the account of Sargent's relationship with Claude Monet, the French Impressionist painter. This includes letters from Sargent to Monet, most published for the first time. In 1890, Sargent began work on a commission to execute a mural cycle for the Boston Public Library. This prompted him to travel to Egypt, Greece, Turkey, Spain, North Africa, and Italy in search of inspiration. The works he painted are a testament to his intellectual preoccupations, and underline his versatility and artistic reach. Following its predecessors in this series, this beautiful book illustrates nearly all of the paintings in colour. Each work is documented, with provenance, exhibition history, and bibliography, and accompanied by relevant studies and drawings.

  • Architecture As Icon - Perception and Representation of Architecture in Byzantine Art

    Presenting the first formulation of a central subject, this volume challenges major assumptions long held by Western art historians and provides new ways of thinking about, looking at, and understanding Byzantine art in its broadest geographic and chronological framework, from A.D. 300 to the early nineteenth century. Byzantine art abandoned classical ideals in favour of formulae that conveyed spiritual concepts through stylized physical forms. Scholarship dealing with Byzantine icons has previously been largely focused on depictions of holy figures, dismissing representations of architecture as irrelevant space-filling background. 'Architecture as Icon' demonstrates that background representations of architecture are meaningful, active components of compositions, often as significant as the human figures. The book provides a critical view for understanding the Byzantine conception of architectural forms and space and the corresponding intellectual underpinnings of their representation. Introduced by four thought-provoking essays, the catalogue divides the material as included in the exhibition into four categories identified as: generic, specific, and symbolic representations, and a final grouping entitled 'From Earthly to Heavenly Jerusalem'. This handsomely illustrated volume addresses various approaches to depicting architecture in Byzantine art that contrast sharply with those of the Renaissance and subsequent Western artistic tradition.

  • Get There First, Decide Promptly - The Richard Brown Baker Collection of Postwar Art

    Richard Brown Baker (1912-2002) began collecting works by emerging artists in the 1940s, becoming one of the first collectors to embrace both Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. He eventually amassed a collection of more than 1,600 works from the postwar period, including works by such groundbreaking American artists as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Chuck Close, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist, as well as European and Asian artists such as Alberto Burri, Jean Dubuffet, Georges Mathieu, and Kurt Schwitters.

    Baker bequeathed the majority of his collection to the Yale University Art Gallery, and the balance to the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design. Highlighting 130 works, this is the first complete history of Baker's important collection. Essays by renowned art historians contextualize each of the five decades of Baker's collecting efforts, while entries on individual artists illustrate the remarkable scope of Baker's holdings. Throughout the publication, firsthand accounts from Baker's extensive personal journals describe his collecting activities within the dynamic New York art scene of the day.

  • A Companion to Economic Geography

    A feast for orchid enthusiasts, botanists, historians, and biodiversity researchers alike, Rumphius' seventeenth-century study of tropical orchids is now available in English for the first time

    Rumphius (1627-1702), founder of Indonesian botanical exploration and one of the greatest naturalists of the seventeenth century, was the first to describe tropical orchids in a Western language. Within the pages of his monumental seven-volume Ambonese Herbal, written in Dutch, he included descriptions of thirty-six species of orchids found on the island of Ambon in eastern Indonesia, plus twelve uncertified ones. His detailed descriptions reflect both the accuracy of a scientist and the sensibility of a poet. This lovely book is the first to gather and translate into English all the sections of Rumphius' The Ambonese Herbal devotedto orchids. For each entry, Rumphius describes the plant, names it according to a pre-Linnaean system of nomenclature, gives its locality, and details its medicinal and non-medicinal uses. More than twenty beautiful line drawings accompany the entries. The volume includes ample notes to illuminate the text and an informative introduction that tells the life of Rumphius--a remarkable collector/naturalist who overcame fire, shipwreck, and blindness to produce his masterwork.

  • Blinky Palermo - Retrospective 1964-77

    The first retrospective in the U.S. to feature German artist Blinky Palermo (1943-1977) includes more than 60 works, most of which have never before been shown in North America. This beautifully illustrated volume spans the breadth of Palermos brief but significant career and explores each phase, beginning with objects and paintings created shortly after he graduated from Joseph Beuyss class at the Dusseldorf Art Academy in the early 1960s and culminating with paintings he produced during his last years in both Germany and New York City. Palermos oeuvre is customarily divided into four principal groupings: the Objects, the Cloth Pictures (Stoffbilder), the in situ Wall Paintings and Drawings, and the late Metal Pictures, including the epic To the People of New York City (1976), now in the collection of Dia Art Foundation. Blinky Palermo also addresses the artists works on paper, including watercolours, sketches, preparatory studies, and prints that he made throughout his career. Essays by distinguished authors position the artists work in relation to postwar American art and culture, which he greatly revered. Topics include the influence of the American milieu on the Metal Pictures; space and time in the Wall Drawings and Paintings; and the insights into Palermos concerns and process afforded by his works on paper. The most comprehensive volume on Palermos career to date, this important book offers a rare opportunity to explore in-depth the work of a remarkably innovative artist, pointing to Palermos relevance and influence on a new generation of artists.

  • Darkness at Dawn - The Rise of the Russian Criminal State

    Anticipating a new dawn of freedom after the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Russians could hardly have foreseen the reality of their future a decade later: a country impoverished and controlled at every level by organized crime. This riveting book views the 1990s reform period through the experiences of individual citizens, revealing the changes that have swept Russia and their effect on Russia's age-old ways of thinking.

    "The Russia that Satter depicts in this brave, engaging book cannot be ignored. Darkness at Dawn should be required reading for anyone interested in the post-Soviet state."--Christian Caryl, Newsweek

    "Satter must be commended for saying what a great many people only dare to think."--Matthew Brzezinski, Toronto Globe and Mail

    "Humane and articulate."--Raymond Asquith, Spectator

    "Vivid, impeccably researched and truly frightening. . . . Western policy-makers, especially in Washington, would do well to study these pages."--Martin Sieff, United Press International

  • Leonardo on Painting - An Anthology of Writings by Leonardo da Vinci with a Selection of Documents Relating to his Carrer as an Artist

    Leonardo's writings on painting--among the most remarkable from any era--were never edited by Leonardo himself into a single coherent book. In this anthology the authors have edited material not only from his so-called Treatise on Painting but also from his surviving manuscripts and from other primary sources, some of which were here translated for the first time. The resulting volume is an invaluable reference work for art historians as well as for anyone interested in the mind and methods of one of the world's greatest creative geniuses.

    "Highly readable. . . . Also included are documentary sources and letters illuminating Leonardo's career; the manuscript sources for all of Leonardo's statements are fully cited in the notes. The volume is skillfully translated and is illustrated with appropriate examples of drawings and paintings by the artist."--Choice

    "Certainly easier to read and . . . more convenient than previous compilations."
    --Charles Hope, New York Review of Books

    "A chaotic assemblage of Leonardo da Vinci's writings appeared in 1651 as Treatise on Painting. . . . [Kemp] successfully applies . . . order to the chaos."--ArtNews

  • Keywords in American Landscape Design

    This beautifully illustrated historical dictionary of landscape design vocabulary used in North America from the 17th to the mid-19th centuries defines a selection of one hundred terms and concepts used in garden planning and landscape architecture. Ranging from alcove, arbor and arch to veranda, wilderness and wood, each term presents a wealth of documentation, textual sources and imagery. The broad geographic scope of the texts reveals patterns of regional usage, while the chronological range provides evidence of changing design practice and landscape vocabulary over time. Drawing upon a wealth of newly compiled documentation and accompanied by more than 1,000 images, this dictionary forms the most complete published reference to date on the history of American garden design, and reveals landscape history as integral to the study of American cultural history.

  • The Social Contract & the First & Second Discourses

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's ideas about society, culture, and government are pivotal in the history of political thought. His works are as controversial as they are relevant today. This volume brings together three of Rousseau's most important political writings--The Social Contract and The First Discourse (Discourse on the Sciences and Arts) and The Second Discourse (Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality)--and presents essays by major scholars that shed light on the dimensions and implications of these texts.

    Susan Dunn's introductory essay underlines the unity of Rousseau's political thought and explains why his ideas influenced Jacobin revolutionaries in France but repelled American revolutionaries across the ocean. Gita May's essay discusses Rousseau as cultural critic. Robert N. Bellah explores Rousseau's attempt to resolve the tension between the individual's desire for freedom and the obligations that society imposes. David Bromwich analyzes Rousseau as a psychologist of the human self. And Conor Cruise O'Brien takes on the "noxious," "deranged" Rousseau, excoriated by Edmund Burke but admired by Robespierre and Thomas Jefferson. Written from different, even opposing perspectives, these lucid essays convey a sense of the vital and contentious debate surrounding Rousseau and his legacy.

    For this edition Susan Dunn has provided a new translation of the Discourse on the Sciences and Arts and has revised a previously published translation of The Social Contract.

  • Cabin, Quarter, Plantation - Architecture and Landscapes of North American Slavery

    Visitors to such historic homes as the Hermitage and Monticello today can study the remains of places where slaves once lived and worked and, in some cases, can view historically reconstructed cabins, garden plots and settlements. New archaeological and historical scholarship can tell us much about the built environments of slavery and the daily lives of slaves in North America. The first book to treat the architecture of American slavery, this important work brings together the best writing in the field, including classic pieces on slave landscapes by W. E. B. DuBois and Dell Upton alongside new essays on such topics as the building methods that Africans brought to the American South; information about slave family units and spiritual practices that can be gathered from archaeological remains; and the differences in the daily lives of rural and urban slaves. The starting point in any study of the impact of the conditions of enslavement, this anthology makes an essential contribution to the fields of African-American history and architectural history.

  • American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture

    The sleek lines and gleaming facades of the architecture of the late 1940s and 1950s reflect a culture fascinated by the promise of the Jet Age. Buildings like Eero Saarinen's TWA Terminal at JFK Airport and Philip Johnson's Four Seasons Restaurant retain a thrilling allure, seeming to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary. In this work, distinguished architectural historian Alice Friedman draws on a vast range of sources to argue that the aesthetics of mid-century modern architecture reflect an increasing fascination with 'glamour', a term widely used in those years to characterize objects, people and experiences as luxurious, expressive and even magical. Featuring assessments of architectural examples ranging from Mies van der Rohe's monolithic Seagram Building to Elvis Presley's sprawling Graceland estate, as well as vintage photographs, advertisements and posters, Friedman argues that new audiences and client groups with tastes rooted in popular entertainment made their presence felt in the cultural marketplace during the postwar period. The author suggests that American and European architecture and design increasingly reflected the values of a burgeoning consumer society, including a fundamental confidence in the power of material objects to transform the identity and status of those who owned them.

  • First Doubt - Optical confusion in Modern Photography: Selection from the Allan Chasanoff Collection

    Many photographers have been intrigued with the baffling distortions--both subtle and disquieting--that can occur when the camera "captures" the real world. Not always intentional, some images dazzle with impossible juxtapositions or disorienting spatial orders, while others confound the viewer's belief in the documentary promise of photography.

    Drawn from the highly respected collection of Allan Chasanoff, the photographs in this intriguing volume confront viewers with the challenge of doubt and confusion in so-called "straight" pictures. Featured are perceptually provocative images by Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Clarence John Laughlin, Imogen Cunningham, and Lee Friedlander, among others. The book's essays raise awareness of the interpretive nature of the lens and the interpolative nature of the medium.

  • Arshile Gorky - A Retrospective

    Arshile Gorky was one of the central figures in American art's shift toward abstraction during the first half of the 20th century. Accompanying the first major retrospective of his work in almost thirty years, this stunning book traces the evolution of Gorky's arresting visual style. Nearly 200 paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints from all phases of his career, a number of which are published here for the first time, are beautifully reproduced, including a large figurative painting from 1927 known previously only through its preparatory studies. Throughout the volume, some of Gorky's best-known and most powerful works are paired with related pieces or with meticulous preliminary studies, shedding new light on his artistic process. Illustrated essays incorporating recently discovered biographical information and photographs examine his experience of the Armenian genocide (during which he witnessed the death of his mother), his collaboration with the Works Progress Administration, and his early explorations of abstraction and Surrealism, providing important reassessments of his life and career. Admired by many of his contemporaries and hugely influential on subsequent generations of artists, Gorky created a complex and deeply moving body of work that encompasses styles ranging from Impressionism to Cubism, Surrealism, and the beginnings of Abstract Expressionism.

  • The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History

    The study of legal history has a broad application that extends well beyond the interests of legal historians. An attorney arguing a case today may need to cite cases that are decades or even centuries old, and historians studying political or cultural history often encounter legal issues that affect their main subjects. Both groups need to understand the laws and legal practices of past eras. This essential reference is intended for the many nonspecialists who need to enter this arcane and often tricky area of research.

  • Sustainability by Design - A Subversive Strategy for Transforming Our Consumer Culture

    The developed world, increasingly aware of 'inconvenient truths' about global warming and sustainability, is turning its attention to possible remedies - eco-efficiency, sustainable development and corporate social responsibility, among others. But such measures are mere Band-Aids, and they may actually do more harm than good, says John Ehrenfeld, a pioneer in the field of industrial ecology. In this deeply considered book, Ehrenfeld challenges conventional understandings of 'solving' environmental problems and offers a radically new set of strategies to attain sustainability. The book is founded upon this new definition: sustainability is the possibility that humans and other life will flourish on Earth forever. There are obstacles to this hopeful vision, however, and overcoming them will require us to transform our behaviour, both individually and collectively. Ehrenfeld identifies problematic cultural attributes, such as the unending consumption that characterizes modern life, and outlines practical steps toward developing sustainability as a mindset. By focusing on the 'being' mode of human existence rather than on the unsustainable 'having' mode we cling to now, he asserts, a sustainable world is within our reach.

  • Queen Anne

    The reign of Queen Anne, the last Stuar